Where do you live and are you affected by this cold weather?

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2000
Where do you live and are you affected by this cold weather?
17
Mon, 01-27-2014 - 3:31pm

We're in central IL. The local schools are today on their 7th snow/cold day for the year. They only have to make up 5 max at the end of the year. It's currently 5 degrees and feels like -14. There's a wind advisory in place til noon tomorrow. Older ds that lives in WI is experiencing temps that don't even reach 0 today and tonight the low (real temp) is supposed to be -20 there. What's it like where you are?

Pam

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Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997

Having grown up in Chicago, where even with rear wheel drive I could drive in the snow, coming to the ice storms we get here in STL was an eye opener.  The ground hardly ever freezes here so when there's snow, the bottom layer is always melting and then refreezing so it's impossible for almost anyone to have traction, even with 4WD.  And no chains or anything here, so on those days everyone is encouraged to stay put. 

Sue

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009

Studs and chains are NOT allowed here You will get a $1000 fine. We drive on properly inflated, winter tires with good trends and we get much worse wiinters than Chicago. No need for studs and chains unless you live way up north. They destroy a road

Avatar for mahopac
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-1997

Ash, I agree. . . I've lived all my life in the northeast but I'm tired of day after day of waking up to single digits.  Really glad DH got me a nice North Face jacket for Christmas though!  I wanted to replace my old Lands End parka but going shopping for winter jackets is really not inspiring and I couldn't muster the energy for it.  So glad DH did the work for me. :)

We lived in Pittsburgh for a few years, where people tend to just be smart about winter driving.  Like Chicagoans, they just deal with it - and Pittsburgh is very hilly, so they were dealing with lots of snowy hills and, back in the 80s, few 4WD vehicles.  New Yorkers tend to take stupid risks in the snow, leading to 4WD SUVs at all kinds of angles to the highway.  I didn't even have a 4WD car until 2006, and I've never gone off the road.  I'd drive slowly past those silly drivers in my trusty Honda Civic and get where I needed to go - though I am quite glad to have 4WD now and wouldn't go back - but I still drive carefully in the snow.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998

The winters in the north are generally consistently cold, which means they don't have the rapid freeze/thaw cycles that lead to the sort of ice that the Southern US is now facing. Even perfectly inflated Canadian winter tires can't drive on highways covered by a thick layer of ice. But it doesn't matter, because they don't need to.

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999

Agreeing w/Kelly & Ash.  Ice is ice.  Inflation, tread, & driving SLOWLY will reduce the chances of a slide, but not save you 100%.  4WD will not save you on ice, either.   Chains and cleats are illegal, so the only REAL remedy, is to stay home.

Where, at the moment, it is snowing AGAIN!!!  I can barely see across the street, but that is more from the blowing than the heaviness of the snow.  It is a balmy +30f here, & I had HOPED to go to the grocery.  Alas, Bree has a stomach virus.  All pretense of potty training has been abandoned, as she will simply stand stock still, clutch her tummy, and the sound of a firehose will ensue.  But at least this is an improvment over the projectile vomiting of 2 days ago.  My fervent prayer now is that WE don't catch it!!! 

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-1999

I did see that on the news and felt bad for the people down there.  The only thing comparable to that in the NE was the blizzard of 78, which I kind of enjoyed since I was living at college in a dorm and had an extra week off from school.  the only bad part was that we lived in an apartment style dorm so when the roads cleared, we were still not allowed to drive anywhere and had to walk a mile or so to the grocery store, which is fun when you are 20.

However, my relatives didn't think it was so fun.  My parents live near a college and somehow there was a girl whose car got stuck near their house (which is not on a main street, so she must have been cutting through) and they had a stranger staying at their house.  My aunt was working at a mall and couldn't make it home so she ended up staying with a coworker.  I think that was before they could really forecast big storms or something like that because people were just caught unprepared.  There were many people who had to abandon their cars on the highway so I think that is why no one was allowed to drive for a couple of days.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009

I really do not understand why my statement of fact-no studs allowed here is a debatable point.

For those interested in learning how snow tires work... look at this excellent article..

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-drive/car-tips/14-reasons-to-ditch-your-all-season-tires-for-the-winter/article15295871/?page=all

What happened down south was the perfect storm of poor or non-existant winter driving techniques coupled with cars not equiped to handle winter conditions.

And for the record. I HAVE driven on ice covered roads, many times.  I drove across Canada in late winter, by myself  via the northern route.  I have driven on country roads (with no salt or sand on them). Lots of them around here since I live on the outskirts of this geopgraphically large city. I have even driven on an ice road, built over a lake. That was fun but a bit strange. We get flash freezes; we get ice storms and freezing rain; snow storms and very cold  temperatures. We get black ice; we get white out conditions (those I hate) and yes, we get snow. We get lots of snow, so much that it can be tricky to back out of my (usually snow covered with ice) driveway because the snow mounds block my view.

Snow clearing on the highway does not start until  1 to 3 inches of accumulation.  And, in a snow storm, it takes time for the major  roads to be plowed. And of course, the salt (if it works) only gets put down after the roads are cleared.  So, yes, I have driven on the highway when there is several inches of snow, on slick roads etc..

And sorry.. still no studs or chains on tires allowed here.

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