Reading?

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Registered: 03-27-2003
Reading?
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Fri, 11-17-2006 - 2:05pm

What books are your 6-7 yo's reading by themselves?

What books are you reading to your 6-7'er?

I'm trying to get some good ideas for DD, we seem to be in a rut.

Thanks!

Lynn

Lynn

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Registered: 06-01-1999
In reply to: nlas99
Fri, 11-17-2006 - 7:58pm

What books are your 6-7 yo's reading by themselves? DS has little interest in reading to himself. He is required to read the Spanish books that come home with him from school. We do ask him to read 1 English picture book to us each night. Occasionally he'll read some Super hero comic books hiw uncle gave him. Honestly though, independant reading is not yet a favored recreation for him. He only turned 6 three weeks ago. I think he needs some physical maturity before he finds reading to himself comfortable (his decoding in both languages is amazing but a simple Dr. Suess and he's exhausted.)

What books are you reading to your 6-7'er? I read DS a couple fun picture books each night and DH is currently reading through the Narnia Series with him. I recently read "The Wizard of Oz" and he loved it. We do mostly the classic read-a-louds, Peter Pan, Winnie the Pooh, Dr. Doolittle, Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle, Mr. Popper's Penguins, Roald Dahl,My Father's Dragon, Stuart Little, Charlotte's Web, Shel Sylverstein, Jack Prelutsky, ect. We have done a couple Magic Treehouse books and Flat Stanely which he LOVED together but I'm trying to save those for him to read independantly whenever the mood strikes him.

Edited to comment on DD. I just realized you were asking for ideas for you DD. My DD really LOVED Cynthia Rylant at that age. She's most known for Henry and Mudge books but she has all sorts of great books at all levels. You might also try reading a horse novel to her (just not Black Beauty... that's got some rough spots.) Mary Louise Alcott also wrote a lovely set of short stories called "The Brownie and the Princess and other stories." We just loved them. I hope that helps. I didn't know if you were looking more for read-a-louds or independant reads.




Edited 11/17/2006 8:05 pm ET by turtletime1
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Registered: 03-27-2003
In reply to: nlas99
Fri, 11-17-2006 - 9:51pm

We read Shel Silverstien together a lot! Tre loves his poems and stories! He likes to read Dragon Slayer by himself and The Magic School Bus series. Scholastic has some really great books...cheap! LOL!!!


Beverly Cleary, I hear, is a great one for girls. *wink*

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Registered: 01-06-2006
In reply to: nlas99
Fri, 11-17-2006 - 11:27pm

Let's see... She's reading Magic Tree House to herself. She loves the Rainbow Fairy series too. We're reading Harry Potter to her right now. She reads a few paragraphs, we read a page. The Frog and Toad books are fun easy readers that are great examples of friendship. Henry and Mudge books are good for that too. If you're looking for read-a-louds, check out a book called The Read-Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease. My mom was an elementary teacher and principal and swears by it. oh... Junie B. is fun too. Grammar is terrible but very funny and engaging. Don't be afraid to try non-fiction. Find something she's interested in (horses, music, karate, dance, etc.) and ask the librarian to recommend something. Check with your school librarian too. Parents don't talk to them much so they LOVE to help.

Good luck!!! Let us know what you find so we can share it with our kids too. :)

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Registered: 08-23-2006
In reply to: nlas99
Mon, 11-20-2006 - 12:23pm
We are really big into Dr. Seuss when we read together and Davonte is starting to read the Dr. Seuss Beginning Reader books by himself.
 
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Registered: 03-27-2003
In reply to: nlas99
Mon, 11-20-2006 - 3:27pm

I mostly lurk, but we are always on the prowl for books for our little one. Truthfully, she's not a big reader. She isn't one to sit by herself with a book. She prefers to use her own imagination or do something more active. No matter how much I would prefer that reading be more enjoyable for her...that's just the way she is. I have noticed that a lot of people who post on parenting boards about reading have children who are a bit more advanced for their age. A first grader reading chapter books independently is quite ahead of the game! We can't afford to buy a lot of books though we do find some through the school's Scholastic clubs, and I don't have a lot of time to run to the library every week, so I went to my daughter's teacher and she was thrilled to be able to help. She sends home a dozen or so books that are perfect for her age and grade level. We use those and then whatever books we can pick up at yard sales or shops such as Goodwill or Salvation Army. When we have finished the ones the teacher sent, we send them back and she sends more. You will probably find that your daughter's teacher has an abundance of material that she would be happy to share. Get your DD involved when you are out shopping for books. Let her look through them and decide if it's something she would be interested in. We have started using chapter books for bedtime stories (one or two chapters a night depending on length) in order to introduce her to the concept. We have some Magic Treehouse, Captain Underpants, Amelia Bedelia, Pony Pals, and Arthur chapter books. We have only read some Magic Treehouse, Captain Underpants, and Amelia Bedelia so far, but we are looking forward to the others. Just getting through one of the easy readers the teacher sends home can be exhausting at times...depends on the day. Consistency is key. Just remember, some kids take to reading a lot more quickly and easily than others. For some, it will always be a chore. To me, the tricky part is finding something they are really interested in. Some of the easy readers books are pretty "lame"..even to a six year old! Good luck..hopefully, some of these titles/subjects will appeal to your DD.

Lilredmom

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Registered: 10-08-2004
In reply to: nlas99
Mon, 11-20-2006 - 8:37pm
I suggest the 'Toad Books' they are a part of the step in to reading set.

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In reply to: nlas99
Mon, 11-20-2006 - 9:16pm

Thank you for the suggestions. Our kids have quite a range of interests and abilities! We have read many of the series suggested, such as Magic Tree House and Junie B Jones. We've read so many of them that we are taking a break and are looking for something different. I'm going through some old, old books that I loved as a kid, such as books by Carolyn Haywood (B is For Besty, Eddie the Dog Sitter, etc.)

I ditto the suggestion of Cynthia Rylant. Her Henry and Mudge series is fantastic. We've also read her Cobble Street Cousins and are almost done reading her Lighthouse Family series and they are both excellent.

We've also read several abridged classics such as Alice in Wonderland, Black Beauty, etc.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

Lynn

Lynn
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Registered: 06-01-1999
In reply to: nlas99
Tue, 11-21-2006 - 12:11am

Here are some more books she might like if she's sick of the Magic Treehouse books. Boxcar Children Series, Cam Jansen Series, Babe, Funny Frank, Because of Winn Dixie, Little House on the Prairie Series, 100 dresses. I haven't read any of the Hank the Cowdog books but I've heard from reputable sources that they are hilarious and nice books. Then there is Judy Blumes "Fudge" Series which is always popular. My DD fell in love with "Molly Moon's Incredible Book of Hypnotism" at that age (as did I.)

And yes, at this age, reading levels can vary tremendously. I tutor and run programs for both advanced and below level readers. My oldest was reading junior high level material independantly when she was 6 while my current 6-year-old can decode at high levels but that alone doesn't make a fluent reader. I've tutored 1st and 2nd graders because they were struggling only for them to end up strong and voracious readers by 5th. Sometimes, they just need space and time to let things "click." I've also worked with advanced readers that didn't really keep their edge as their peers got older. Then there are the kids who will always be ahead or behind in this particular area no matter. The human brain development is quite fascinating.

You are brave to read Black Beauty. My DD read the unabridged version a few year ago and just sobbed like a maniac. I'd never read the book so was totally clueless to the suffering described. I was more of a Black Stallion type of girl.

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Registered: 11-01-2006
In reply to: nlas99
Fri, 12-01-2006 - 1:01am


Hi,

I just found this board... Woot!

My son is 6 and in first grade. He has esotropic strabismus (an inward crossing eye) and it is sometime difficut to find out if he his having some mild issues with learning to read, or he is having trouble getting his eyes to do what he wants them to do.

My son can read begining readers by himself and is starting to enjoy reading to himself. He has a book Jack and Jill and Their Dog Bill. He laughs and laughs when he reads it.

He likes to read anything that rhyms, Dr. Seuss is a great favorite, he needs some help but not too much. One fish Two fish, Hop on Pop, and the Foot Book come to mind.

He found a book called Dan Frontier at my Mom's and is trying to read that by himself but he still needs help with it.

As for reading to him, we read The Trumpet of the Swan over the summer and I think we are going to start Cricket in Times Square soon.

As an avid Lego constructor he is hooked on the Bionicle comic books that Lego sends us in the mail. And there is also a series of books that go with the Exo-force Lego sets that we read to him. He can now follow the instructions and put Lego sets together by himself... a wonderful milestone!!!

Good luck
-eleanor

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Registered: 03-05-2004
In reply to: nlas99
Mon, 12-04-2006 - 8:18pm

DD won't be 6 for another couple of weeks & she's a Kindergartener, so she's probably not at the same place as other 6-7's as far as independent reading.

What books are your 6-7 yo's reading by themselves? DD is just beginning to read on her own (she knows maybe 20 sight words?) so she's reading the books she brings home from school and words here & there when we read to her. She's really jazzed about being able to participate in BookIt (one of the monthly requirements is that she reads her school books to someone) and she's done it 2 months in a row now. She loves having her little bookit hologram tag on her backpack.

What books are you reading to your 6-7'er? Whatever she asks for, we returned 50+ books to the library yesterday & checked out a bunch more. Last night we read Seven Silly Eaters, a book about teddy bear fire fighters & Crispin the Terrible. The current chapter book we're reading is Goblins Don't Play Video Games (Bailey School Kids) and she's absolutely in love with the Bunnicula Collection on CD (James Howe). We've had to discontinue Junie B Jones in our home. DD gets too many creative (and unwelcome) ideas (not to mention vocabulary & horrid grammar) and I'm personally tired of hearing "My name is Pinky Gladys Gutzman". Maybe next year she'll be mature enough to take Junie with a "she's fiction" sprinkle of salt.

Tomorrow night St. Nicholas will leave dd the first 3 Magic Treehouse books. For Christmas I got her some books that will interest her and that reading correctly will lead to tangible results: 2 cookbooks, "How to Draw Horses & Foals", make your own balloon animals, a spy book, an animal face paint book & a couple of story books.

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