Back on the subject of reading...

Avatar for suzyk2118
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Registered: 07-30-1997
Back on the subject of reading...
7
Tue, 07-15-2003 - 4:22pm
DH has decided that ds listening to me reading aloud to him 'doesn't count'. We've been steadily reading Newberry winners and Mark Twain (MO) winners; are just finishing our 6th book for the summer (not counting Harry Potter 5, which we're reading when all 3 of us are together..that's going much slower!). Do you think ds and I reading together, with me reading aloud, 'counts'? He's just not into reading on his own over the summer (did plenty in school, even for fun; every free moment according to his teacher), but loves being read to...plus he's in a totally physical camp 5 days/week and is really pooped when he gets home. I love our time reading together, but I do want to be sure he's doing what he needs to - the school has asked that he reads 10 books over the summer. (He reads well above grade level, so I'm not concerned about him falling behind in that regard) Ok, seriously, what's your take? Don't spare my feelings...

Sue

Avatar for suzyk2118
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Registered: 07-30-1997
Sun, 07-20-2003 - 8:28am
Thanks for that perspective. DH is still convinced it shouldn't count, but is 'giving in'. I'm having ds try to read 3-5 books totally of his choice (going with a Wayside School followup for now) while I'm reading to him at a different time. Yes, I'm choosing ones above level with vocabulary that he's just sopping up like gravy, so I feel like I'm doing some 'home schooling' this summer without really making him aware of it, which I feel pretty good about!

BTW, we're reading Crispin, the Cross of Lead by Avi right now - we're not terribly religious, but it has led to some wonderful discussions about what life in the 1300s must've been like. Great read! (Loved A Simple Shard by Linda Sue Park before that.) It's one of those books you don't want to put down!

Sue

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Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 07-19-2003 - 12:50pm
The only kids I know who don't enjoy reading are ones who were forced to read, for their own good.

My own dd is a fluent, early reader who reads well in two languages, way above grade level. She still enjoys being read to and I still read to her almost every day. I read things to her just for fun, but I also sometimes pick things that I know she would have trouble reading completely independently. Although she reads well, understanding the individual words is such a small part of fruitful reading. So, I think reading aloud most definitely counts and that it is an important part of learning about language, literature and life. Besides, from a purely practical perspective I would imagine it is excellent preparation for university, where much depends on being able to absorb information and meaning through the spoken word in lectures.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2003
Wed, 07-16-2003 - 1:44pm
OK, I'm definitely impressed - he can play GameBoy and still pay attention to what's being read?!?!? The rest of the world doesn't exist for Sean when he's playing his GameBoy and there'd be no way he could follow a story being read to him.

Best Always,

Sherrie

co-cl

Sherrie Rainbow

Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997
Tue, 07-15-2003 - 8:58pm
Thanks - everyone's comments make sense. DS is well above grade level in his own reading, has wonderful vocabulary (teachers always comment on it; I stop when we're reading and ask if he knows what this or that means when I'm not sure he knows; I'll then provide a definition if he doesn't, and he's the type who remembers after one time with the new word), has fantastic comprehension, is an ace speller and can pick out poor sentence structure, so again, I don't see it as a need that he has to read on his own for those reasons for it to 'count'. He does often watch as I read, and always throws in comments when he has something to say about the content, and it's very insightful. So I still think it 'counts' as he's definitely into the books (even if he's sometimes playing GameBoy with no sound when I read! During those times, I 'quiz' him more than usual and he's right there with the answers).

I offered to get a couple of Wayside School books and he says he'll read them on his own as he enjoyed the first one, so I think we'll end up with a mixture. I'd like to think that will satisfy the 'requirements'!

Sue

Avatar for keke0116
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Registered: 03-26-2003
Tue, 07-15-2003 - 8:32pm
What I do with Kevin is take turns reading pages (we read the pages on whatever side we're sitting on.) That way, he's reading, but not having to do 100% of it. I think kids (of all ages) benefit from being read to ... it helps them understand how language flows, and if they follow along (watch) as we read, it actually improves their own reading level and comprehension. I like having him read to me, too, so that I know he's reading properly and tackling some new/challenging words. And, generally, I'll end up doing more of the reading ... he'll get tired and I'll finish the chapter, even if that means I read a few of 'his' pages. But, like you, I enjoy our time together ('tho we've not done as well in this area as I'd hoped.) If he is reading about grade level, then I think that listening to a story should 'count' ... although I'd probably have him read at least some of the pages.

Nancy

Nancy 

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Avatar for cl_janetlh
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Registered: 03-19-2003
Tue, 07-15-2003 - 7:52pm
I've read and was told many times by our school administrators that reading aloud to our children is very important, even once they read on their own. It provides learning that isn't provided by reading to themselves, plus bonding time with the reader. For example, children hear our inflection and sentence phrasing. The reading teachers in 5th grade read books aloud to the class. I read a book aloud to Rachel this summer for the first time in probably 2 years, and we both really enjoyed discussing the book.

IMHO, from what you said- that your son normally reads to himself willingly, and that he reads above grade level- it sounds to me like reading to him over the summer is a terrific shared experience, and should "count". (For a reluctant reader, a combination might be better.) Just my 2 cents!

Janet

Janet


Jewish Family Life

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2003
Tue, 07-15-2003 - 5:49pm
Good question, Sue!! My opinion is that the reason for the reading and his language abilities determines whether or not it "counts". If the purpose of the reading is just for pleasure or to expose him to books that he might not otherwise read on his own then whether he reads them or you read them is not important IMO. If the purpose of the reading is for him to gain vocabulary skills, reading comprehension, study spelling and sentence structure, grammar, etc then I don't think being read to is *completely* fulfilling that requirement (though it does in part). If these aren't problem areas for him then I personally don't see anything wrong with these reading sessions "counting".

Best Always,

Sherrie

co-cl

Sherrie Rainbow