The Battle!!!

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-16-2008
The Battle!!!
80
Sun, 02-17-2008 - 5:17pm

Well it appears my last post really got quite a bit of discussion started. So lets see if I can get another debate fired up. Ladies you know us men we often open our mouths when we shouldnt.............oh well

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2008
In reply to: theliving
Tue, 02-19-2008 - 5:07pm

I am confussed.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-10-2003
In reply to: theliving
Tue, 02-19-2008 - 6:13pm

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I can't make that kind of statement for all women! For some women, it may ultimately prove to be so, and for others, a vaginal delivery may be safest for THEIR circumstances. In general, the risks for a complications during a c section are much more serious than vaginal delivery. However, under specific circumstances it may be the safest method for both woman and the child that's born.

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And they may be right if they have conditions that make a vaginal delivery riskier than that of the general population. Note that I am not talking about the current trend of pregnant celebrities who choose c sections in the absence of any circumstances that warrant one.

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The difference is between the general, statistical risks that exist across a demographic, and individual risks that present themselves to unique cases. In cases where a c section is deemed SAFER it may be that it is safer for the FETUS and not particularly the woman {ie: fetal distress]the woman. If it is deemed safer to the WOMAN then the vaginal delivery's risk have FAR exceeded those of the general risk of which we commonly speak. Hope that clarifies it sufficiently for you. Breakdown: c sections are done when the risks of vaginal delivery are GREATER for either the fetus, the woman or both. in any case, vaginal delivery risks have elevated past those of the general statistical sort .

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And again, the reason is totally IRRELEVANT, the risks themselves constitute the foundation for reproductive choice.

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This is the last time I will clarify.

When you ar3e pregnant,there exists risks to your health- whether you abort, continue to gestate and those in childbirth. Since ANY of those affect and may produce damage to a woman's body, her health, her reproductive health as well as many other major body systems: neurological, cardio-vascular, endocrine, urinary, etc., NO ONE can be permitte4d to choese a course of actions that effectively forces one set of risks upon her if she is unwilling to accept that option and with it, those sets of risks.

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Yes. However, a 1 in 5 risk of major abdominal surgery is nothing to scoff at and certainly constitutes the basis for a woman's rights to reproductive choice. Take it down to 10%. Same answer. Take it down to nil, and I will still cite risks form vaginal deliveries and gestation itself.

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Haven't a clue., If I were remotely interested I'd look it up. You should too if you are curious.

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I can only say in my case, it may have saved mine as well as Nicholas's. It was likely I would have, at the very least, been unable to have anymore children after a mid-forcep delivery and with as molded as his head was, the likelihood of him surviving was about not good.


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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-17-2007
In reply to: theliving
Tue, 02-19-2008 - 7:13pm

Your pelvis wasn't big enough, right? Neither was my mom's. She is really small and petite. She got an X-Ray (she still can't believe they gave her an X-Ray while she was pregnant) and they said there was no way on earth she could pass a normal-weight baby.

Still, she had to labor for 28 hours with my brother because they were closing the old hospital the ambulance took her to and they weren't sure if they should do the section there or at the new hospital. My sister and I were both scheduled c-sections, obviously.




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Thanks

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-10-2003
In reply to: theliving
Tue, 02-19-2008 - 7:45pm
Yup- and his little head was like a conehead- I could feel it being rammed about my bones with each and every contraction.. Even now, some 20 years later- I wear a size 3 low-rise~ my hips are really narrow, inside and out...

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2004
In reply to: theliving
Tue, 02-19-2008 - 7:47pm

>>Even now, some 20 years later- I wear a size 3 low-rise~ my hips are really narrow, inside and out...<<

Is it against TOS to make rude hand gestures at the comp screen?




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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2007
In reply to: theliving
Tue, 02-19-2008 - 7:54pm
ROFL!

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
In reply to: theliving
Tue, 02-19-2008 - 10:27pm

re: cesarean rates and maternal mortality-
it's complicated, and there seems to be a middle ground. The countries with the very lowest and highest section rates have higher maternal mortality than those with moderate cesarean section rates - which makes me think we need to have cesarean surgery available but not over-used.

It's not that we can say that a woman here in America has a 33% chance of NEEDING a section - it's that she has a 33% chance of GETTING one, that includes those women who are "too posh to push" or who were pressured into an induced labor which created the need for a cesarean - I would consider that to be an unnecessary surgery. Anyhow, I don't see those rates declining anytime soon, and even if they did, a 1 in 5 chance of a surgical delivery is a pretty scary risk.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
In reply to: theliving
Tue, 02-19-2008 - 10:29pm
for nearly 25 years it was standard practice to xray for "cephalopelvic disproportion" just as we now offer ultrasounds to pregnant women. Creepy, huh!
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-15-2006
In reply to: theliving
Tue, 02-19-2008 - 11:24pm

"Even now, some 20 years later- I wear a size 3 low-rise~ my hips are really narrow, inside and out..."

What's a size 3? I didn't know sizes went that small... *various hand gestures to erosia*

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-11-2005
In reply to: theliving
Wed, 02-20-2008 - 1:23am
As I've had a nature birth to a 8 lber & 9lber and had to have ER C-Section for 6 lber, I would would volunteer for a c-section anytime!
~~Sam stitches well with others, runs with scissors in her pocket. Cheerful and stupid.

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