Bishop bars Kennedy from communion

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-04-2004
Bishop bars Kennedy from communion
17
Sun, 11-22-2009 - 12:08pm

http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2009/11/22/paper-bishop-bars-kennedy-from-communion/

November 22, 2009
Paper: Bishop bars Kennedy from communion
Posted: November 22nd, 2009 09:48 AM ET

Washington (CNN) – Rep. Patrick J. Kennedy, A Rhode Island Democrat, said the Roman Catholic bishop of Providence has forbidden him from receiving communion due to his support for abortion rights, the Providence Journal reported on its Web site Sunday.

Kennedy said Providence Bishop Thomas J. Tobin "instructed me not to take communion and said that he has instructed the diocesan priests not to give me communion," the paper reported.

The report said a spokesman for Tobin declined to comment on whether the bishop told Kennedy not to receive communion. According to the report, the spokesman denied that Tobin ordered any priests to refuse Kennedy the fundamental Catholic sacrament.

The item was posted on the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Kennedy's uncle, John F. Kennedy, the nation's first Catholic president.

Patrick Kennedy recently opposed the strengthening of anti-abortion language in the House health care bill. He later supported the final version of the bill, which included tough language on the use of federal money for abortions.

Kennedy is the last member of his family serving in Congress after the death this year of his father, Sen. Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts. The Kennedys have been the most prominent Catholic family in U.S. politics for the past 60 years.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-10-2003
Tue, 12-01-2009 - 2:22pm

<>

By Catholic standards that I was taught for 13 years, yes. Don't say I agree with it- and I'm no longer a Catholic, LOL.

<>

Yep it does.

<>

Give Benny time, LOL.

<>

Yep- we were told just that during a sermon before the election, especially as it pertains to abortion only voting for pro life candidates.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-20-2009
Tue, 12-01-2009 - 6:27pm
I would agree with you if the Church were consistent in its standard. Like Carmina pointed out, Catholics who support the Death Penalty, either through belief or action, haven't been asked to stop receiving Communion and neither have doctors who work for organizations that provide abortions. Going after Sen. Kennedy is a publicity stunt and it's over reaching, IMO. Either consistently leave Communion choices up to the individual receiving it or consistently bar those grave sinners from receiving it, but don't pick and choose. It's hypocritical at best and a complete abuse of the separation of church and state at worst.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-10-2003
Wed, 12-02-2009 - 12:31pm

The Catholic Church does not forbid application of the dearth penalty though.

<

Another kind of lawful slaying belongs to the civil authorities, to whom is entrusted power of life and death, by the legal and judicious exercise of which they punish the guilty and protect the innocent. The just use of this power, far from involving the crime of murder, is an act of paramount obedience to this Commandment which prohibits murder. The end of the Commandment­ is the preservation and security of human life. Now the punishments inflicted by the civil authority, which is the legitimate avenger of crime, naturally tend to this end, since they give security to life by repressing outrage and violence. Hence these words of David: In the morning I put to death all the wicked of the land, that I might cut off all the workers of iniquity from the city of the Lord.

In Evangelium Vitae, Pope John Paul II suggested that capital punishment should be avoided unless it is the only way to defend society from the offender in question, opining that punishment "ought not go to the extreme of executing the offender except in cases of absolute necessity: in other words, when it would not be possible otherwise to defend society. Today however, as a result of steady improvements in the organization of the penal system, such cases are very rare, if not practically non-existent." The most recent edition of the Catechism of the Catholic Church restates this view. That the assessment of the contemporary situation advanced by John Paul II is not binding on the faithful was confirmed by Cardinal Ratzinger when he wrote in 2004 that,

if a Catholic were to be at odds with the Holy Father on the application of capital punishment or on the decision to wage war, he would not for that reason be considered unworthy to present himself to receive Holy Communion. While the Church exhorts civil authorities to seek peace, not war, and to exercise discretion and mercy in imposing punishment on criminals, it may still be permissible to take up arms to repel an aggressor or to have recourse to capital punishment. There may be a legitimate diversity of opinion even among Catholics about waging war and applying the death penalty, but not however with regard to abortion and euthanasia.

While all Catholics must therefore hold that "the infliction of capital punishment is not contrary to the teaching of the Catholic Church, and the power of the State to visit upon culprits the penalty of death derives much authority from revelation and from the writings of theologians", the matter of "the advisabilty of exercising that power is, of course, an affair to be determined upon other and various considerations.">>

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_punishment#Roman_Catholic_Church

Sources:

85. http://www.cin.org/users/james/ebooks/master/trent/tcomm05.htm
86. Papal encyclical, Evangelium Vitae, March 25, 1995
87. Assuming that the guilty party's identity and responsibility have been fully determined, the traditional teaching of the Church does not exclude recourse to the death penalty, if this is the only possible way of effectively defending human lives against the unjust aggressor.
88. http://www.priestsforlife.org/magisterium/bishops/04-07ratzingerommunion.htm
89. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/12565a.htm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2005
Wed, 12-02-2009 - 2:24pm

There was a picture in my local paper pertaining to the squabble over abortion between

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-20-2009
Wed, 12-02-2009 - 4:59pm
Ha! That shows how much I know on official Church positions. I guess
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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-10-2003
Wed, 12-02-2009 - 8:42pm
LOL- I think I made it a point so I could argue with them better! Me and couple friends drove a 1st year male teacher at our all girls high school and drove him to the monk-ery the following year.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-20-2009
Thu, 12-03-2009 - 4:58pm
How funny! I'm sure if I'd had to go to a Catholic school I would have paid more attention for the same reason. But listening to an hour-long Mass every week didn't always seem like a priority as a child.
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