Fantasise with me for a moment...

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
Fantasise with me for a moment...
43
Mon, 07-23-2007 - 11:03am

...what if a fetus COULD be taken from one womb and implanted into another? What if fetal adoption was possible?

Wobit, is this is any way a future medical possibility?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-24-2003
Mon, 07-23-2007 - 11:07am
The problem would still remain--is it worth it for the woman who created the z/e/f to go through surgery to affect the transplant? Unless Scottie fixed the transporter so he could beam the z/e/f into another, this would still be a major concern.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
Mon, 07-23-2007 - 11:13am

If you look far enough into the future, all things are possible. :)

It would really depend on what stage you are talking about.

Prior to implantation (or during the very earliest stages, before the early parts of the placenta have rooted) I imagine it would be theoretically possible to administer a cramping agent and sort through the expelled blood for the zygote (you'd have to use a microscope), sustain it in an artificial fluid until intrauterine injection into the adoptive woman. That would be tough and very time-sensitive. It takes a few days to properly hook up the nourishment of the placenta so I guess that would be a window of opportunity.

After implantation, as best I can imagine it, it would have to be an open-uterus surgery, wherein the placenta was carefully severed away from the uterus and transplanted into a hormonally prepared woman who was maintained on immune-suppressing drugs to avoid rejecting the placenta. Since these tissues (uterus and placenta) are so vascular (rich in blood vessels) this would be very difficult.

But we are imagining the future - and like I said, given enough future I'm sure it'll come.

But I'd suspect we'd tighten up down to the last few hundredths of a percentage point on birth control far sooner. It would be simpler.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-15-2005
Mon, 07-23-2007 - 1:25pm

We do embryo transfers with horses; I can't imagine human transfers wouldn't be far off in the future.

I don't think that even when the technology is available it obligates women to permit the transfer in lieu of abortion.


iVillage Member
Registered: 08-13-2003
Mon, 07-23-2007 - 1:35pm
i would think the health risks involved would far outweigh the risks of an abortion since major surgery would be needed.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
Mon, 07-23-2007 - 2:04pm

<>

Isn't that an embryo transfer the mixing of sperm and ovum in the dish, and transfer of the resulting embryo? That's already done - I think we have posters here that have benefited from this.

The tricky bit would be the getting of a fertilized embryo out of an unhappily pregnant woman. At that stage, it's tiny and there would be lots of blood and larger clots so it would be hard to find and extract.

If it were honestly a completely safe procedure, wouldn't this be a lot like IVF parents deciding what to do with leftover embryos? Should there be laws about that now? I don't think so, but I see that as a more pure philosophical question, and a good "stepping stone" to the originally posted question.

Should IVF parents have the right to discard their own leftover embryos?




Edited 7/23/2007 2:05 pm ET by wobitnobby
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-15-2005
Mon, 07-23-2007 - 2:28pm

<<>>

Nope. Donor mare is bred and uterus is flushed 7 days later. Embryo is transferred into the recipient mare. Has about a 50% success rate.

*edited for clarification




Edited 7/23/2007 2:29 pm ET by sisfox


iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
Mon, 07-23-2007 - 2:44pm

<>

That's awesome. That may be a better success rate than dish-to-uterus transfer in humans. How do they flush the uterus - just with fluid, or do they make the uterus of the donor mare inhospitable? And how do they sort out the embryo?

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-15-2005
Mon, 07-23-2007 - 3:00pm

The uterus is flushed with Dulbecco’s, and uterine massage helps the process. The fluid is filtered and then put under a scope to find viable/large enough embryo(s).

We don't use this process all the time, for every mare - only for super valuable mares that we don't want to lose competition time with or with really fabulously bred mares that are getting too old to carry to term or have been unsuccessful carrying in the past. It's really expensive and can be hard to justify, unless you're pretty sure the foal will have a lot of value. And that part is all guesswork. LOL


iVillage Member
Registered: 04-03-2005
Mon, 07-23-2007 - 4:52pm
You know, that truly is very fascinating! I thank you, Sis, for teaching me something new today that I previously had NOOOOOOOOO idea about! How cool is that?! Honestly!



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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Mon, 07-23-2007 - 6:33pm
I think it definately has potential. of course it's major surgery, but I suspect it would be less invasive then a C-section
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