Genetic Testing and choice

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-11-2008
Genetic Testing and choice
49
Sat, 01-26-2008 - 9:51pm

With genetic testing and posible engineering seeming more and more the reality of our near future, many believe that screening/engineering for disease, sexual orientation and gender will become common place.

 "Pascal's Wager," which states that believing in God costs you nothing if you're wrong, and wins you everything if you're right.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
Wed, 01-30-2008 - 9:30am



In many pharmacies, there is only one employee at a time. Are you saying that they should be forced to provide a service that they are opposed to? If so, would you hold the same standard to a doctor? Should they be required to provide an abortion if they are opposed to it but there is no one else in the office available or willing to provide the service?>


Just to butt in, there is a HUGE difference between not providing a service that one is opposed to and not providing a service to an abusive and possibly violent person who believes that the service she has requested is murder.


In the UK, no physician is required to serve a physically or verbally abusive person. If they can't behave decently towards their doctor, they risk not getting treated at all.


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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-09-2007
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 9:13pm

<>


Yes. If someone shows signs of being mentally altered I think it would be irresponsible to proceed with a sensitive medical procedure. Two women I know who have been 100% sure of their decisions to abort and do not regret it still struggled with their emotions after undergoing the procedure. A woman who believes that abortion is murder and that her abortion provider is murdering her child SHOULD be questioned in her decision because it may not be what she really wants. People can consent to anything they want. I could consent to have my right arm surgically removed. Would a doctor just say "ok" and remove it? Probably not.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-29-2005
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 6:45pm

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-11-2005
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 4:47pm

>So then you have no problem with a pharmasist denying to fill a pc woman's RU480, right?<

Yes I do, they aren't doing their swore job and need to get into another line of work, same as not giving someone their bc pills.

~Sam

~~Sam stitches well with others, runs with scissors in her pocket. Cheerful and stupid.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-11-2005
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 4:12pm

>Are PC women, who are PRO WOMAN, really ok with girls being aborted because parents want a boy? Are you OK with children being aborted because they may be gay? Is it ok to abort because a child may develope cancer sometime in their adult life? Are we crossing the line of ethics by aborting due to genetic testing or engineering?<

Yes it ok depending on what it was for, now let me explain~~aborting because a fetus because they were gay, no~~certain life ending disease yes~~a girl fetus because they wanted a boy (and they all ready have 2 or 3 girls, really not my business)

~Sam

~~Sam stitches well with others, runs with scissors in her pocket. Cheerful and stupid.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 3:34pm

You keep trying to say that I am claiming this is common! Heehee! I introduced it as a weird anecdote, which couldn't be more different than a generalization. I have scrounged up a whole bunch of tangentially related stuff in order to satisfy the offshoot that you are aiming for, but I don't really get it.

Onto your other hypotheticals:
you are agreeing that an hours drive is a barrier - so since you understand that MAP measures its time-sensitivity in days or fractions thereof and abortion measures its time-sensitivity in weeks, you understand that it's a different scale.

I don't think the abuse is common, I think iyt's rare enough to only be reported anecdotally. I provided that link, I can paste it in entirety ifg you need me to.

physicins can provide limited service as long as will refer for reasonably available alternative to not impair health of patient

As a med student I think that there are certain board certifications that oughta require abortion training or at least training in fair counseling. ob/gyn. if don't wanna provide can specialize in subfield of gyn or ob not related, or can certify in Fam Med if wanna deliver babies & not come anywhere near AB training. The ACOG currently requires that AB training be offered in order for residency to remain accredited.

grammar and punctuation suffering as nursing at keyboard

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-29-2005
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 2:57pm



I'm sorry but I don't find any statistics in your links that show that Catholic women that are PL are having abortions and then going out to walk the picket lines.




Yes I know. I'm just trying to find some study that supports your claim.




I agree. Let's not make this odd. Where are the statistics that show that women are aborting and then going out to protest against abortions?




Thank you for pointing out that those in rural areas have difficulties. If they have to drive for over an hour to reach a pharmacy, it would be safe to say that they probably would have to drive the same distance to find a second doctor that would be willing to prescribe birth control or preform an abortion.




There are many procedures that require the same amount of time but the need for them being done in a timely fashion may not be the same. It takes about the same amount of time to write a prescription for BC than it does to write one for prenatal vitamins. If a doctor can pick and choose what services they offer to a customer, why shouldn't other professions also?




I don't think that anyone should be subject o verbal abuse. I also don't think that it happens often to OBs either. If it is a problem as you claim, where is the data?




As someone entering the medical field, do you think that there should be laws that require OB/GYNs to provide BC and abortions?

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 2:27pm

<>

I don't have a strong need to convince you. I provide answers largely for lurkers and because your questions sometimes lead me to interesting research. There are tangential reasons to believe that the numbers are still not inconsiderable, such as the percentage of women choosing abortion who are Catholic or evangelical Christian. I know that there are women who are PC who are Catholic or evangelical Christian but I'd guess not all.
http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/journals/3422602.html
You may not regularly use original research articles, but the vast majority require a subscription and only small briefs or abstracts are made freely availably. When we link them in their entirety we are leaning on general use licenses paid for by schools and medical libraries.

I would agree with you that for a woman nearing the limit of gestation an urgent scenario could become emergent. But let's not make this peculiar scenario any more odd - statistically most abortions are not pushing 13 weeks, let alone 24.

The laws as they apply to pharmacists are just. Do you live in a rural area? My uncle drives over an hour to reach the nearest pharmacy and I don't know where the next closest one is. Fortunately he has his own transportation. What about the women that don't?

I'm glad that you found the hemorrhoid to be such a silly comparison. I was trying to find a medical procedure that takes a similar amount of time with the provider. Do you think that the colorectal surgeon ought to be subject to such verbal abuse, or only obstetric surgeons?

It's great that you are able to understand how many women have time and transportation pressures which limit their access. I agree that it ought to be easier for them to access their abortion with their regular gyn provider.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 1:09pm
I think that many catholic-owned hospitals prevent their physician staff from prescribing BC, as well as EC, or providing abortions. It's a concern especially in the case of hospital mergers, a real pressure to reducing access.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 1:07pm
I totally agree. It's awful to think of a woman driven to the place where she feels she must choose abortion as the lesser of evil options, despite having strong feelings that it is wrong. I agree that it's not hypocrisy, but desperation. (I think it leans toward hypocrisy when that woman continues, after her abortion, to focus on measures to criminalize instead of prevent).

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