Georgia billboards link abortion, race

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-04-2004
Georgia billboards link abortion, race
5
Sun, 02-14-2010 - 4:33pm

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hVPN2jSeFwagJEk9CTRZQpPl6NjgD9DS3HLO0

Controversial Ga. billboards link abortion, race

By ERRIN HAINES (AP) – 3 hours ago

ATLANTA — The message on dozens of billboards across the city is provocative: Black children are an "endangered species."

The eyebrow-raising ads featuring a young black child are an effort by the anti-abortion movement to use race to rally support within the black community. The reaction from black leaders has been mixed, but the "Too Many Aborted" campaign, which so far is unique to only Georgia, is drawing support from other anti-abortion groups across the country.

"It's ingenious," said the Rev. Johnny Hunter, national director of the Life Education and Resource Network, a North Carolina-based anti-abortion group aimed at African-Americans that operates in 27 states. "This campaign is in your face, and nobody can ignore it."

The billboards went up last week in Atlanta and urge black women to "get outraged."

The effort is sponsored by Georgia Right to Life, which also is pushing legislation that aims to ban abortions based on race.

Black women accounted for the majority of abortions in Georgia in 2006, even though blacks make up just a third of state population, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Nationally, black women were more than three times as likely to get an abortion in 2006 compared with white women, according to the CDC.

"I think it's necessary," Cheryl Sullenger, senior policy adviser for Operation Rescue, said of the billboard campaign. "Abortion in the black community is at epidemic proportions. They're not really aware of what's actually going on. If it shocks people ... it should be shocking."

Anti-abortion advocates say the procedure has always been linked to race. They claim Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger wanted to eradicate minorities by putting birth control clinics in their neighborhoods, a charge Planned Parenthood denies.

"The language in the billboard is using messages of fear and shame to target women of color," said Leola Reis, a spokeswoman for Planned Parenthood of Georgia. "If we want to reduce the number of abortions and unintended pregnancies, we need to work as a community to make sure we get quality affordable health care services to as many women and men as possible."

In 2008, Issues4Life, a California-based group working to end abortion in the black community, lobbied Congress to stop funding Planned Parenthood, calling black abortions "the Darfur of America."

Pro-Life Action League Executive Director Eric Scheidler said a race-based strategy for anti-abortion activists has gotten a fresh zeal, especially in the wake of the historic election of the country's first black president, Barack Obama, who supports abortion rights.

"He's really out of step with the rest of black America," Scheidler said. "That might be part of what may be shifting here and why a campaign like this is appropriate, to kind of wake up that disconnect."

Abortion rights advocates are disturbed. Spelman College professor Beverly Guy-Sheftall called the strategy a gimmick.

"To use racist arguments to try to bait black people to get them to be anti-abortion is just disgusting," said Guy-Sheftall, who teaches women's history and feminist thought at the historically black women's college.

"These one-issue approaches that are not about saving the black family or black children, it's just a big distraction," she said. "Many black people don't know who Margaret Sanger is and could care less."

Photobucket



Lilypie Second Birthday tickers



Lilypie Fifth Birthday tickers



Photobucket
Photobucket

Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-10-2003
Sun, 02-14-2010 - 5:48pm

First: Correct me if I am wrong, but I was told it was not politically correct to say "black", but rather I should say "African American". I do not want to offend, so tell me the current correct terminology.

Next, do African-Americans statistically not also have larger families than Caucasians, Native Americans and those of Hispanic descent? How does the rate of live births and abortions in the African American group stack up in terms of total pregnancies when compared to other racial groups?

And lastly, for example: specifically in this case in Georgia, where *blacks* accounted for a *majority* (and I'd like to know the actual PERCENTAGE which could be 50.1%)of the abortions while accounting for a third of the population, what percentage of live births were they also responsible for?

.
.
.



iVillage Member
Registered: 04-20-2009
Mon, 02-15-2010 - 3:41pm

As for the correct terminology,

Image and video hosting by TinyPicLilypie Breastfeeding Ticker
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-10-2003
Mon, 02-15-2010 - 6:34pm

<>

I was too, but let me tell you, I was told in no uncertain terms that the term "Black" is about as correct as "Colored". Shrug. I really have no idea anymore.

.
.
.



iVillage Member
Registered: 04-19-2006
Tue, 02-16-2010 - 8:34am

I think it all depends on who you are talking to. I know people who prefer black over African American and think African Canadian just sounds silly.

Mostly though my friends who are darker accept either term as long as it is used ONLY as a descriptive. If someone calls them black/brown the same way they would call me pale it doesn't bother them but some people manage to use the word "black" or "African American" with the same venom they would say the N word.

Sort of OT but when Obama was elected I was watching something that referred to him as "the first black president" and DS and my niece had no idea what a black person was even though the 2 girls that just left our house were black. I am hoping that it is indicative of their age group but maybe my family is just particularly oblivious.

Photobucket
*
Follow me to the Unplanned Pregnancy board!Follow me to Hot Debates!Follow me to Abortion Debate!
Photobucket

Lilypie Pregnancy tickers
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2009
Tue, 02-16-2010 - 1:00pm

Yes, the far Right always hides their racism when the need arises...they truly have no shame.

Martin Luther King Jr. had a very positive relationship with Planned Parenthood.

http://www.plannedparenthood.org/about-us/who-we-are/reverend-martin-luther-king-jr-4728.htm

"For the Negro, therefore, intelligent guides of family planning are a profoundly important ingredient in his quest for security and a decent life. There are mountainous obstacles still separating Negroes from a normal existence. Yet one element in stabilizing his life would be an understanding of and easy access to the means to develop a family related in size to his community environment and to the income potential he can command.

This is not to suggest that the Negro will solve all his problems through Planned Parenthood. His problems are far more complex, encompassing economic security, education, freedom from discrimination, decent housing and access to culture. Yet if family planning is sensible it can facilitate or at least not be an obstacle to the solution of the many profound problems that plague him."

He understood that forced childbearing wasn't going to help anyone. Telling any group of women that they need to be having baby after baby - when they don't want to - to keep whatever group wants them to in a majority is abusive and disrespectful.

For this PL group to co-opt the ideals of the civil rights movement, when they oppose basic civil rights, is just laughable.




Edited 2/16/2010 1:02 pm ET by mom_carmina