Got my ire up!

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2008
Got my ire up!
77
Wed, 04-16-2008 - 3:52pm

Ther more I think about this, the more upset I am getting... must share.


I went to the building in which my sister (Shannon) works to tend to a client account.

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-29-2004
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 3:53pm

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 3:54pm

Me: Is there a positive side to having a Downs' baby rather than a healthy one?

You: Yes. Even if you test negative for DS, you may still have a baby with health problems.

I'm aware of that, but I don't think that answers the question. Could you clarify what the positive side is to having a baby with Downs rather than a healthy baby?

I understand that some Downs children are able to lead fairly full lives. Many, however, are not. It is impossible to tell at the testing stage what the severity of the condition will be, as far as I know.


Powered by CGISpy.com pregnancy
baby siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 3:56pm

The positive side is that the baby can grow up and lead a productive life.>

I must have put my question badly. No Downs child will lead a 'normal' life, as a healthy child would. Therefore, what is the positive side of being told that you have a Downs baby rather than a healthy one?

I understand that there are worse conditions out there. But we're talking about Downs specifically.


Powered by CGISpy.com pregnancy
baby siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 3:59pm

As far as I know, cleft lip and club foot are repairable with surgery. To the best of my knowledge, we do not have the technology to remove the extra chromosome from a Downs child.


Powered by CGISpy.com pregnancy
baby siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-29-2004
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 4:00pm


The positive side is that you will have a baby. What is the positive side of aborting any/all fetuses that are not healthy? It appears that you would abort for DS, (please correct me if I'm wrong). Would you abort any fetus that isn't healthy?
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-17-2007
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 4:02pm

"The arguement appears to be that a fetus with DS is not healthy so it is aborted at a high rate while other unhealthy conditions are not routinely aborted."

And that does not prove that anyone here is arguing that they *should* be aborted.

"I agree but I also believe that with the laws that we have, it is very difficult to get a list of these women to contact."

You are apparently under the mistaken assumption that researchers must violate HIPAA to get a list of women to contact in order to have a study. I and others have shown you several alternatives that researchers *do* use to get participants for a study.




Powered by CGISpy.com


Thanks

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 4:02pm

I don't understand what your basis of comparison is between cleft lip and Downs. One is treatable, the other is not. One can lead a completely normal life after treatment, the other cannot. One has a normal life span, the other does not.


Powered by CGISpy.com pregnancy
baby siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-17-2007
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 4:05pm

"It appears that you would abort for DS, (please correct me if I'm wrong). Would you abort any fetus that isn't healthy?"

Nothing Lianne has said indicates that at all. I would make the exact same arguments that she has (that the extent of DS is hard to tell in utero or at birth; that people with DS will never have a normal life), yet I would not abort a fetus for DS.




Powered by CGISpy.com


Thanks

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 4:05pm

You seem to really be dodging the plain fact that having a healthy child is preferable to having an unhealthy one :o)

It depends on the condition, what the ramifications would be, what treatments exist and what the longterm prospects are. And yes, I would probably abort for Downs. For me, it's partly a moral question, but that's just my own view.


Powered by CGISpy.com pregnancy
baby siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-10-2003
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 4:28pm

<>

• Less stress on the primary caretaker
• Less chance of bankruptcy due to medical costs associated with disabilities
• A normal childhood for the siblings as opposed to one where the legitimate needs of the child with disabilities always takes precedence to those of the rest of the family
• Less chance of needing to live in a residential care facility when the parents can no longer render care

I could go on and on and on. It's all in the eyes of the beholder though. And when I had amniocentesis, it was with the decision that any genetic anomalies they did find would result in termination of that pregnancy because I could not find any positives in raising one at that point in my life.

.
.
.

Pages