Hydrocephalus = PBA treatment?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-01-2003
Hydrocephalus = PBA treatment?
6
Sat, 11-15-2003 - 3:19pm
After hearing of how medically necessary this treatment is to insure the life of the mother. I did my own research. Findings: Its classified in the same area as Spinal Bifida. Everyone know what that is? Okay. Think March of Dimes, together we can all prevent it. I started think, hydro- means water in latin and -cephalus is that brain? Anyway hears what I found PBA isn't listed as a treatment for the this:

Source: National Hydrophalus Foundation

http://www.nhfonline.org/

Facts of Hydrophalus

http://www.nhfonline.org/page4.html

Causes of Hydrophalus

http://www.nhfonline.org/page5.html

Treatment of Hydrophalus

http://www.nhfonline.org/page6.html

Interesting PBA isn't mentioned, this is more dangerous to the fetus

Shunts and Hydrocephalus

http://www.nhfonline.org/page7.html

Related Articles

http://www.nhfonline.org/page8.html

More articles

http://www.nhfonline.org/page9.html

Interestingly babies are sometimes born w/ sb and hydrocephalus, meaning that babies with bifida should now also be PBA'd. I'm sorry I heard no one mention that SBifida was also a cause for PBA's, since they are in the same class.

Does anyone have another suggestion for why this procedure is necessary?


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 11-15-2003 - 3:42pm

Non-severe hydrocephalus is livable, severe is not.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 11-15-2003 - 3:53pm

Here is a second link - and I'm not sure how "un-biased" these sources are, I'm just grabbing examples...


http://www.gentlebirth.org/archives/hydrceph.html


"Information about Hydrocephalus and D&X

According to Dr. William F. Harrison, a diplomate of the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology writing in the Arkansas _Times_ a weekly newspaper, "approximately 1 in 2000 fetuses develop hydrocephalus while in the womb." Usually not discovered until LATE in the second trimester, "it is not unusual for the fetal head to be as large as 50 centimeters (nearly 20 inches) in diameter and may contain ... close to two gallons ... of cerebrospinal fluid." (The average *adult* skull is about 7 to 8" in diameter.)


Studies show that most elective abortions occur in the first trimester. Second or third trimester abortions are usually because of birth defects or danger to the mother.

Dr. Harrison says the partial birth and the "draining" of the fetus' skull is actually drawing off of this fluid from the brain area of the fetus. The collapsing of the fetal skull is to allow the removal without the brutal rupturing of a woman's uterine passage or necessitating a classic cesarean section that poses its own dangers to a woman and any future pregnancies. The fetus with severe hydrocephalus cannot live and we wish someone would let people like Ralph Reed, Orin Hatch, Pat Robertson, and Pope John Paul II know that they are condemning women to death for no reason - no reason except their damned puny male egos.

Approximately 500 women face this procedure each year. Mild to moderate hydrocephalus can be sometimes be treated in utero and the fetus saved, and some very mild cases can be delivered and treated after birth. Those which have advanced or severe hydrocephalus cannot. Without the "partial birth" abortions, their births can easily kill their mothers with no chance of fetal survival.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-13-2003
Sat, 11-15-2003 - 4:38pm


Which is why the PBA ban has an exeption for when the mother's life is at risk.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 11-15-2003 - 4:43pm
That's fine, I understand that - but doesn't the OP ask about PBA and hydrocephalus?
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-13-2003
Sat, 11-15-2003 - 4:58pm


Yes, and I'm not disagreeing wiht anything you've posted, I'm only pointing out to people who may not know that the case of severe hydrocephalus WOULD be exempt from the PBA ban. I've seen so many things written about the ban that say "no exception for the mother's health" that I think some people assume that there is no exception for when the mother's life is at risk either.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-11-2003
Sat, 11-15-2003 - 5:50pm
I cannot see where there is ever a situation for the procedure that has been coined as PBA. but i am not a Dr. anyone at all know exactly what life threatening situations this could be used for? PC or PL, anyone>?