Kinda OT: Adoption policy theory

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-08-2007
Kinda OT: Adoption policy theory
3
Thu, 08-09-2007 - 11:36am

Are any of you ladies following the Allison Quet story?

In a nutshell a woman used a sperm donor to become pregnant. She concieved twins and had a horrible pregnancy. She was hospitalized at about 7 months of pregnancy and was even told she might die at a point. Eventually she gave birth to a healthy boy and a girl. She then developed postpartum pyschosis and started hearing voices telling her to give the babies up for adoption. She confided in a friend about this. This particular friend knew a couple who was wanting to adopt. Allison's story is that they knew she was weak and vulernable and they manipulated her into giving the baby's up for adoption (the twins were adopted out to the couple the friend knew). She wants them back. She has sought medical treatment and a doctor has said she was not in the right state of mind when she gave the children up. The couple is claiming she was and is just suffering from some regret, which is normal. If you are wanting to know more you can Google Allison Quet and find all the stories.

But this brings me to my point. In this state, and I'm sure most others, there is no evaluation from a medical psychiatrist when a girl is giving her child up for adoption. There are probably many more cases where the girl was suffering from a postpartum disorder and truly might not have been at a point where she could consent. The agencies are very much into getting things signed and set in stone right away. In this state they like it to be done at 48 hours after birth, the absolute minimum amount of time required to wait after a birth. Is this wrong? Would it be unfair to require these girls are seen and evaluated and then a doctor signs off that they are indeed in a correct state of mind mentally? This kinda ties into abortion since pre-abortion counseling is required, although there is debate on how much good it actually does.
Any thoughts on this?

Ella Grayce

Lilypie1st Birthday Ticker
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 08-09-2007 - 11:49am

Just a thought here, but if pre-adoption counseling were required, who would pay for it? And if the agencies ended up paying (on the assumption that most women giving babies/children up for adoption cannot afford to raise them), don't you think such counseling would be a bit biased on their behalf?


There is a reason why even after the papers are signed that a woman may regain custody of her adopted out child(ren) within 6 months of the adoption. This is to protect women from hasty decisions they may have made when suffering from PPD. If you really think that something needs to be done to protect new mothers more, perhaps a longer opt-out period would be more workable than required counseling?

Sandy
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-08-2007
Thu, 08-09-2007 - 12:25pm

"Just a thought here, but if pre-adoption counseling were required, who would pay for it? And if the agencies ended up paying (on the assumption that most women giving babies/children up for adoption cannot afford to raise them), don't you think such counseling would be a bit biased on their behalf?"

I see no problem in the agencies or adoptive parents paying for it. And you're right that anything through that particular agency would be biased, so one would have to seek the care through a neutral office and doctor. The adoptive parents are forced to pay so much money for the mother's needs anyways (some pay for maternity clothes, prenatal care, etc) I don't see another couple hundred would really hurt. Or the agency could pick up the tab, since I don't believe they are not-for-profit to begin with. The paperwork and court fees to adopt a child is rougly $5,000, yet they tell adoptive parents to expect to pay over $20,000 for a child. Where is the extra money going?

"There is a reason why even after the papers are signed that a woman may regain custody of her adopted out child(ren) within 6 months of the adoption. This is to protect women from hasty decisions they may have made when suffering from PPD. If you really think that something needs to be done to protect new mothers more, perhaps a longer opt-out period would be more workable than required counseling?"

Is that really true about regaining custody after 6 months? I'm seriously asking...I don't know. I have a little experience with agencies, since my sister gave a child up through one. She was told beforehand that after the papers were signed in the hospital the baby would leave with the couple and she couldn't change her mind at that point. I realize the adoption isn't final until a judge signs off on it. They told my parents that the papers would be sent to a judge days after signing and he would sign without question. So basically they explained to us that within a week or so it is final and nothing more can be done. Is that not the case everywhere?

Ella Grayce

Lilypie1st Birthday Ticker
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-03-2005
Thu, 08-09-2007 - 12:55pm

"Is that really true about regaining custody after 6 months? I'm seriously asking...I don't know. I have a little experience with agencies, since my sister gave a child up through one. She was told beforehand that after the papers were signed in the hospital the baby would leave with the couple and she couldn't change her mind at that point. I realize the adoption isn't final until a judge signs off on it. They told my parents that the papers would be sent to a judge days after signing and he would sign without question. So basically they explained to us that within a week or so it is final and nothing more can be done. Is that not the case everywhere?"


I've heard of such cases where the biological mom has changed her mind up to a year after the birth of the child, and was successful in regaining custody.



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