A question about PBA

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-12-2003
A question about PBA
17
Thu, 11-13-2003 - 12:07pm

I'm going to try and get a rational discussion out of this, I swear.


Before I begin my question, I just want to let everyone know that the answer I am looking for should not include anything about a "right wing conspiracy" or "Bush's cronies trying to push religious blah blah blah"

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Avatar for munchies
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-12-2003
Thu, 11-13-2003 - 1:06pm

There are many issues with the PBA and you really need to look into this from the medical perspective to understand the PBA.

Kim mom to Brad, Matt, Emma, Sarah, and Meagan

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
Thu, 11-13-2003 - 1:12pm

The only hard & fast medical reason for PBA that I have seen discussed at length & in great detail is cases where the baby has SEVERE hydrocephalus. In these cases, the baby will nto live long outside of the womb, the head is up to 22" diameter, and the mother can, in no way, deliver this child vaginally. The skull of the fetus is collapsed so as to deliver it.
http://www.religioustolerance.org/abo_pba1.htm
<It is not unusual for the fetal head to be as large as 50 centimeters (nearly 20 inches) in diameter and may contain...close to two gallons of cerebrospinal fluid." In comparison, the average adult skull is about 7 to 8 inches in diameter. A fetus with severe hydrocephalus is alive, but as a newborn cannot live for long; it cannot achieve consciousness. The physician may elect to perform a D&X by draining off the fluid from the brain area, collapsing the fetal skull and withdrawing the dead fetus. Or, he might elect to perform a type of caesarian section. The former kills a fetus before birth; the latter allows the newborn to die after birth, on its own. A caesarian section is a major operation. It does expose the woman to a greatly increased chance of infection. It "poses its own dangers to a woman and any future pregnancies." 2 Allowing a woman to continue in labor with a severely hydrocephalic fetus is not an option; an attempted vaginal delivery would kill her. >>


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
Thu, 11-13-2003 - 1:16pm
Then how about an intrauterine injection to cause death, then induction in those cases where fetal/genetic anomaly is discovered & the woman wants to terminate?
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-12-2003
Thu, 11-13-2003 - 1:17pm

Well... in the case of the fetal head not fitting through the pelvic bone, wouldn't that be an exception for the life of the mother?

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-12-2003
Thu, 11-13-2003 - 1:23pm
To reply to the part about fetal anomaly, well I've never been a fan of eugenics, but I guess that's a whole different discussion now, isn't it
Avatar for munchies
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-12-2003
Thu, 11-13-2003 - 1:38pm

There are some doctors who do this.

Kim mom to Brad, Matt, Emma, Sarah, and Meagan

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-19-2003
Thu, 11-13-2003 - 1:40pm


Do you mean ANY fetal or genetic anomaly that the woman considers undesirable in her offpsring? That she could order lethal injection and then delivery of a fetus of any gestational age upon discovery of anomaly and/or her decision that she does not desire to deliver a live baby with such anomaly?

*ignoring the issue of placental transferrence of lethal agents; my point was: My question still stands assuming the lethality were induced without harm to the mother


Edited 11/13/2003 1:43:00 PM ET by victday

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-31-2003
Thu, 11-13-2003 - 2:26pm
I was 8 months pregnant with my son when an ultrasound discovered that his urethra was completely blocked off. The problem had been overlooked in previous ultrasounds. Bobby's (my baby boy) bladdar was so enlarged that his heart was underneath his armpit, and his other organs did not develop. He had virtually no lungs. The doctor gave me three options. He told me that I could ignore it, give birth to Bobby as if I had never been told, and then he would surely die at birth, being unable to breathe and all. Number two was to go into his bladder via amnio needle and withdraw urine, give birth, and try to replace his organs....he would live to see age two if we were lucky. Option #3? Terminate by injecting saline into his deformed and useless heart, enduce labour. The doctor also made it very very very clear to me that Bobby was in fact suffering severely at the time and was under a great deal of physical stress. What on earth does a loving mother do? Keep in mind please that there was absolutely no risk to my life, except in the rare event that he die naturally inside me which would never have happened anyway.

What would a loving parent do?

Sarah
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-19-2003
Thu, 11-13-2003 - 2:39pm
Gosh, I don't think that merkful (I didn't spell that right, did I?) was arguing the "what's a loving mother to do?" point. You have provided an example (it's more than just an example when it's from your own life, isn't it? My condolences to you for going through such a horrible experience) of a very bad anomaly. I was going to refine my question a little further later but I'll refine it now: Since merkful raised the idea of termination of fetuses with anomalies, would the range of anomalies have a limit, or would it be any anomalies that the woman considers problematic? Someone on another board mentioned extra digits as being worthy of termination. That's part of what brings this question to mind.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-09-2003
Thu, 11-13-2003 - 3:37pm
This is also my question. When the new ultrasounds (3D) were introduced, and I don't think I could ever find this article again if my life depended on it, 23 out of 26 fetuses were aborted for having a cleft palatte. It wasn't in this country, but it was still very disturbing. According to the article, many doctors were hesitant to use the new technology for routine preg. ultrasounds because parents were aborting such easily correctable anomalies (club foot, missing fingers/toes or "extra digits", gender(not correctable of course), and other minor problems were included). I haven't had the impression that anyone on this board would agree with this (I guess they'll let me know if I'm wrong), but why did that poster think "extra digits" was a problem?

Danelle

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