Question for Pro-Lifers

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-09-2007
Question for Pro-Lifers
110
Thu, 02-26-2009 - 2:05pm

I'd like to know how pro-lifers feel about vaccinations. Which of you vaccinate? Which of you don't? Why or why not?

I'm asking here instead of the Vaccine Debate Board because of the number of people here I'm certain are pro-life and I'm looking for some answers and correlations.

Thanks

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-09-2007
Thu, 03-12-2009 - 6:01pm
You're right, Knowledge is power. There is a difference between seeing an ingredient and actually researching it though, kwim? I would venture to say that the average person doesn't know what "diploid" is. Did you? We should all arm ourselves with information and just being told something by a doctor or pharmaceutical company is not "information". As you saw in your case, they aren't always forthcoming with real facts or verbiage that people can understand.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-06-2009
Fri, 03-13-2009 - 11:56am

<in my experience, most everyone who vaccinates is doing so without the info.>


I think some people just accept it as part of what you

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-09-2007
Fri, 03-13-2009 - 12:12pm

I agree that it is just something people do without question. No offense but those people are sheep. I do think there are a growing number of us who are homeschooling and not vaccinating for reasons other than religion.

I just cannot understand why someone would claim to have full knowledge AND understanding of the ingredients and side effects along with the risks and still chose to vaccinate.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-06-2009
Fri, 03-13-2009 - 12:27pm


None taken, since I'm not one of those people :o)



For me personally, based upon the research I did while pregnant, I believe the risks of not vaccinating outweigh the risks of vaccinating. It's really as simple as that.


ETA: Please bear in mind that two

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2009
Fri, 03-13-2009 - 12:35pm

"For me personally, based upon the research I did while pregnant, I believe the risks of not vaccinating outweigh the risks of vaccinating. It's really as simple as that. "

This is also my view - there is also another debate board for this.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-09-2007
Fri, 03-13-2009 - 12:42pm

No, I agree that two people can come to different conclusions based on different research. EX, the scientists who disagree on the autism/vaccine link. I also understand the benefit/risk analysis. I suppose I just don't understand why someone would see something like the measles a bigger risk than something like seizures or autism. I guess it just boils down to the denial that those risks are present when you vaccinate.

Whatever your decision (or anyone else's for that matter) I certainly respect it more if the person does actually at least try to research on their own. Like I said in a pp, there's a difference between reading a label and actually researching what's on that label.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-13-2006
Fri, 03-13-2009 - 1:07pm

>>For me personally, based upon the research I did while pregnant, I believe the risks of not vaccinating outweigh the risks of vaccinating. It's really as simple as that. <<


The same goes for me.

"It is right to be contented with what we have, but never with what we are."

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-13-2006
Fri, 03-13-2009 - 1:15pm

"I suppose I just don't understand why someone would see something like the measles a bigger risk than something like seizures or autism. I guess it just boils down to the denial that those risks are present when you vaccinate. "


That last sentence is pretty insulting.

"It is right to be contented with what we have, but never with what we are."

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-17-2007
Fri, 03-13-2009 - 4:29pm

"No, I agree that two people can come to different conclusions based on different research. EX, the scientists who disagree on the autism/vaccine link."

You're convinced that the doctors who agree with it are looking at the right evidence, and the doctors who disagree with it are looking at the wrong evidence.

After the research I did, I came to the conclusion that the theoretical connection between vaccinations and autism were based on studies that were largely inconclusive and pretty widely discredited at this point. Beyond that, the *correlation* between vax and autism was connected to mercury, and none of the vaccinations Elizabeth has received/will receive contain mercury. And yes, I checked.

"I also understand the benefit/risk analysis. I suppose I just don't understand why someone would see something like the measles a bigger risk than something like seizures or autism. I guess it just boils down to the denial that those risks are present when you vaccinate."

I might not think measles is a bigger risk, but I think polio is. I think Hepatitis B is. I don't intend to get her vaccinated against Chicken Pox (I might vax for it later if she doesn't get it as a child because it can be quite serious for an adult), but the causal link between vaccinations and seizures or autism (which you seem to accept as absolute, unquestioned fact) is actually hugely contested and very, very inconclusive.

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/concerns/mmr_vaccine.htm

In fact, I wish they would continue some vaccinations that they don't do anymore, like smallpox. My parents were inoculated against smallpox as were several generations before, but not my generation or later because it was thought that the disease was eradicated. Well, it's still technically around, and could be used in germ warfare. Yes, the virus that killed 300 million people in the 20th Century is still around, and after many decades of some areas of the world having no exposure to it, we have no defenses against it. Variola has been without a doubt the virus leading to the highest mortality of all time, and we have no defenses against it (although we could).

So I suggest that you play the odds your way, and I'll play the odds my way. I've got first-hand experience with contracting nearly every kind of disease imaginable (except the ones I was vaxed for, of course), and I wouldn't wish the same on my own daughter with much bigger and more deadly diseases. Your "conclusive" evidence is not conclusive in my estimation, and therefore I choose to take the risks you find insurmountable.




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Thanks

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-10-2003
Fri, 03-13-2009 - 4:44pm

Did you realize that no one with eczema can ever receive the small pox vax since it can cause eczema vaccinatum? And since the small pox vax is cellular, it can actually harm people around the vaccinee? That would mean you'd have to sequester the vaccinees until that period of time where they presented grave risk to those around them was over. And note that the eczema doesn't have to be active- the existence of a history contraindicates this vaccine.

http://www.nationaleczema.org/smallpox/faq.html

THE SMALLPOX VACCINE AND ATOPIC DERMATITIS/ECZEMA

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

1) WHAT IS THE SMALLPOX VACCINE?
The smallpox vaccine is made from a virus called vaccinia, which is a pox-type virus related to smallpox. The vaccine contains live vaccinia virus-not dead virus like many other vaccines. For that reason, the vaccination site must be cared for carefully to prevent the virus from spreading. The vaccine does not contain the smallpox virus and cannot give you smallpox.

2) WHY SHOULD SOMEONE WHO HAS ECZEMA OR ATOPIC DERMATITIS AND THEIR FAMILY MEMBERS NOT RECEIVE THE VACCINE?
The smallpox vaccine contains a live virus that can be harmful or even fatal to those with eczema or atopic dermatitis. Family members of eczema sufferers should not take the vaccine unless they have been exposed to smallpox, because the live virus in the vaccine can harm the afflicted family member on contact.

3) WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OR RISKS IN RECEIVING THE SMALLPOX VACCINE?
There are side effects and risks associated with the smallpox vaccine. Most people experience normal, usually mild reactions such as a sore arm, a fever, and body aches. But other people experience reactions ranging from serious to life threatening. People with atopic dermatitis or other eczemas may develop a spreading vaccinia infection called eczema vaccinatum, which can be fatal. Even people who have had atopic dermatitis just once in the distant past may contract this infection.

It is estimated that there are approximately 17 million individuals in the United States who have atopic dermatitis, and many of these people would be susceptible to eczema vaccinatum if vaccinated or in contact with a vaccinee.

4) WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME PEOPLE WERE VACCINATED FOR SMALLPOX?
Routine vaccination against smallpox stopped in the United States and many other countries in 1972. In 1979, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended that such vaccinations be stopped in all countries. Vaccination was recommended only for special groups, such as researchers working with smallpox and related viruses. By 1982, routine vaccination had been officially discontinued in 149 of the 158 member countries of WHO. By 1986, routine vaccination had ceased in all countries.

5) WHO IS AT RISK OF HAVING ECZEMA VACCINATUM?
In the past, eczema vaccinatum has occurred in persons suffering from eczema or with a history of atopic dermatitis who were vaccinated or came into contact with someone else who was vaccinated. Eruption initially occurred at sites on the body that were affected at that time by eczema or had previously been affected. These eruptions became intensely inflamed and sometimes spread to healthy skin. Symptoms were severe. The prognosis was especially grave for infants with large areas of affected skin.

6) WHAT ARE THE DANGERS OF PEOPLE WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS/ECZEMA ACQUIRING VACCINIA FROM A VACCINATED PERSON?
People with atopic dermatitis/eczema should avoid contact with recent vaccinees. Vaccinia is generally transmitted from person to person through direct contact, so precautions should be taken to reduce the likelihood of such contact. If you accidentally come in contact with someone who has been vaccinated or with something that may be contaminated with live virus, wash immediately and thoroughly with soap and warm water. The period during which a recently vaccinated person is a threat is three weeks to one month.

7) HOW IS VACCINIA TRANSMITTED FROM THE VACCINATION SITE?
Vaccinia is spread by touching a vaccination site before it has healed or by touching any materials that might be contaminated with live virus from the site-materials such as bandages, towels, clothing, or washcloths used by a person who has been vaccinated. Vaccinia is not spread through airborne contagion. Transfer of the vaccinia virus can occur from touching the vaccination site before it has healed and then touching other parts of the body, or from contact with a vaccinee whose lesion is in the florid stages.

8) WHAT ARE THE OPTIONS FOR A PERSON WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS/ECZEMA WHO COMES INTO CONTACT WITH VACCINIA?
With early recognition and appropriate use of Vaccinia Immune Globulin (VIG), mortality can be reduced to zero, and morbidity alleviated. However, even if there is a delay in recognition, prompt institution of VIG should be undertaken. Untreated patients become quite ill and evidence systemic symptoms. If unrecognized and untreated, the patient will manifest severe systemic symptoms resembling septic shock, and death ensues.

9) WHAT IF I HAVE ATOPIC DERMATITIS/ECZEMA AND BECOME EXPOSED TO SMALLPOX?
If exposure to smallpox occurs, then vaccination is recommended, even for those people with atopic dermatitis/eczema. Vaccination within three days of exposure will completely prevent or significantly modify smallpox in the vast majority of persons. Vaccination four to seven days after exposure likely offers some protection from smallpox or may modify the severity of that disease.

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