The Silent Scream

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2008
The Silent Scream
133
Tue, 01-22-2008 - 11:39pm

Hello! I'm new to this board. I am a very passionate prolifer and not for religious reasons. I wasn't sure if any of you had heard or seen this film before. It is very moving to say the least. I was able to find it on youtube. Here's the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THS2zZ4m260. I hope it works. I would love to hear feedback if you watch it! Thanks!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
In reply to: runluv
Thu, 02-14-2008 - 4:45pm
I'm so glad to hear your birthing went so beautifully... it's nice to hear about it being done well here, too. I just wish that every woman felt as cared for as you were. Someday!
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-13-2006
In reply to: runluv
Thu, 02-14-2008 - 3:37pm

I had a great birth experience in the US.

"It is right to be contented with what we have, but never with what we are."

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
In reply to: runluv
Thu, 02-14-2008 - 11:49am
*sigh*
I keep finding new reasons to drool over the British healthcare system. I know it's not perfect, but ours is so incredibly broken that it looks that way in comparison.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
In reply to: runluv
Thu, 02-14-2008 - 4:11am
My sister's baby didn't get to nurse right away but that was only because she was born in teh back of the car on a cold March morning (nearly a year ago!) and was blue, so they had to get her into the warm right away. As soon as my sister was indoors and on a bed, they unwrapped the baby and put her skin-to-skin. I believe (though I may be wrong) that skin-to-skin as soon as humanly possible
baby siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
In reply to: runluv
Thu, 02-14-2008 - 4:07am

<"Colleen & Lianne's House O' Horrors & Tubals - Completely non-invasive tubal ligations -- just listen to Colleen's STORY OF HORRORS, and your tubes will tie themselves!

baby siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2007
In reply to: runluv
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 2:27pm

I have to say it's nice to have you back!

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
In reply to: runluv
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 1:42pm

It's nice to be back a little bit - she's napping and I have practically forgotten what to do with myself!

There's an upside and a downside to being in the hospital all the time. I'm exposed to every cold and diarrheal illness that exists... but now that I'm at home with my babe she's reaping the reward.
I haven't decided on pox myself, but through attachment parenting boards and groups a mama can often find a "pox party" and if you decide that you really prefer that your child contract chicken pox, you can probably make it happen. Let me know if you need any leads on that.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2007
In reply to: runluv
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 1:24pm

As odd as it may sound to say this, I think you're lucky you were exposed (and are obviously ok) and your breastmilk is *immunizing* the baby.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
In reply to: runluv
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 1:19pm
Clearly, with your family history there is something odd going on... but the way the medical community is stating it now, they aren't sure that pure cervical cancer *ever* happens without HPV. Up until very recently no one cared, so no one tested, but now there's a question of should we test people's blood for HPV instead of doing a Pap.
( ! )
It would certainly be more comfortable for millions of women, but would it be safe? So suddenly people really want to know if HPV is a *sensitive and specific* test for cervical cancer. And now that they are looking for it that way, they are finding that at least 99% of cervical cancer cases are positive for HPV.
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/327/7425/0-g
And when they look at the HPV negative cases, they turn out to be ovarian, endometrial, bladder, or other cancer that has migrated into the cervix. Wow.
From what I can scan on pubmed right now it seems like there are lots of studies ongoing right now. Other people share your concerns.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
In reply to: runluv
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 1:06pm

I think I'm going to spread my vax out too. :) It all depends on what your risk factors are, in my mind. For example, pertussis can kill a baby and is rather common nowadays, so if my baby was going to be in daycare or around large numbers of strangers, I'd be all about getting DTP soon! Except that I contracted pertussis myself two years ago, so my breastmilk is actively protecting my baby, so I'm much less concerned about that one. It's such a complicated decision!

HPV has been found in people's mouths and under people's fingernails! So though it hasn't been proven yet I believe that heavy petting will soon be shown to transmit HPV. Likewise, the HPV colonization of the mouth is connected to oral cancer, so my cousin the STI epidemiologist is all about encouraging gay men to get this vaccine. Wow.

Transmission of any disease from mother to baby is called "vertical transmission". Here's a 2004 press release about a small study in a hospital where they tested mothers, fathers, and newborns for HPV. Of 574 women, 29% were infected. 6 mother-baby pairs were found to be infected but it turned out they were different strains - must be contracted from hospital staff or under the fingernails of the researchers! Ewwww~ but at followup all the babies cleared the virus. Phew.
http://www.natap.org/2004/newsUpdates/020604_07.htm

Basically, the virus 'likes' mucus membranes best, especially cervical cells, but can be carried between those oasis on people's fingers. If a baby gets the virus, it wasn't during delivery, it was because someone got it on their hands and then changed the baby's diaper.

Realistically, it is far, far, far more likely that your friend contracted HPV from sex or heavy petting. Or heck, it's more likely that she shook hands with someone who had it and kept it under her fingernails until she next masturbated than that she got it in infancy. If the virus had been festering in her cervix since infancy, her pap would probably have turned abnormal by 8-10 years of age.

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