Superbowl ad, now that we've seen it...

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2006
Superbowl ad, now that we've seen it...
274
Mon, 02-08-2010 - 9:38am

...what are your thoughts on it?


I was actually pleasantly surprised that they really didn't force any sort of viewpoints on the viewers.

2010 Siggy

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-28-2008
Fri, 02-12-2010 - 4:11pm

I have my ways with anyone who would attempt to sexually harrass me but as you claim the amazons of the woman's movement have paved the way for me already what would I have to worry about?

As far as needing these places oh I won't ever need them trust me, I never have and never ever will. I would need them like a I need a pile of trash. Oh.by the way, I would never have self esteem so low that I would be taken in by a smooth tongued coward who gets his kicks by beating me. I know better but even if I were fooled for a moment he would rue the day he touched me if he made it out alive.

Yes I think I will be quite cozy without the woman's movement and it's rhetoric.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-06-2009
Fri, 02-12-2010 - 5:30pm

<<>

Really because My father was getting away with it clear up until the 90's.>

Yes, really. The fact that nobody charged your father with the crime does not mean it wasn't one.

< You know civil rights kicked off the abolition of jim crow laws but that does not mean that everyone started acting right because the LAW said so.>

You seem to have forgotten that my original point was that if it weren't for feminism, domestic violence would probably not be a crime. You challenged that statement. I have proved it. You have now decided that whether something is a crime doesn't matter, thus completely changing the frame of the debate.

Not at all. I know that domestic violence exists, both in your coutnry and mine.

I also know that it is because of feminism that DV victims have the legal power to do something about it. Before feminism, they did not. Pure and simple.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-06-2009
Fri, 02-12-2010 - 5:33pm

The mere fact that you have the right to an education, the right to marry the consenting man of your choice, the right to choose abortion or adoption, the right to have any level of custody of your children, the right to NOT be beaten or raped by your husband, the right to own property, the right to vote...

ALL of these came to you because of the feminism movement. If you choose not to recognise it, that's up to you. But what you're saying is EXACTLY as if a black South African said 'I don't care about Nelson Mandela, he did nothing for me'. Or if a black American said 'pfft, what difference did the civil rights movement make anyway?'

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-28-2008
Fri, 02-12-2010 - 6:18pm

It was not exclusively because of any women's movement that DV was brought to anyone's attention, was it in part due to their efforts? I will give them that. I also credit women like my mother who worked in DV shelters and who used her own money to help women escape their situations and who went to court with other women,helping them through the process and never once asked for recognition or anything for herself she did it in true sisterhood with helping in that fight.

SO you are saying basically that all victory belongs to feminists and that any effort done outside that movement or organization is absolutely nothing? Or perhaps that their presence gives the efforts of women like my mother validation?

How typically feminist.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-28-2008
Fri, 02-12-2010 - 6:56pm

<>>

Umm no,
I believe that was Board Vs. Brown. this was decided by nine MEN at the time. and Wayyyyyy before a women's movement.

<< the right to choose abortion or adoption, >>

Nope that was a very personal battle dubbed Roe VS. Wade. By the way, nine MEN decided this too for a woman, the feminist movement MERELY claimed victory for that and to this day piggybacks on it.

<<>>

That would be due to family law not the feminist movement.

<>

That would be due to criminal courts not the feminist movement.

<<< the right to own property,>>

Now see, women owned property in my country and yours long BEFORE any feminist movement Sarah Winchester,is a good example of that.

<< the right to vote...>>

That would be thanks to the 19th amendment NOT the feminist movement and due to the signatures, approval and efforts of some MEN again.

Gee, for a lady who claims to know the history of american law you seem to be getting a lot WRONG!

<<>

No they did not.

<< If you choose not to recognise it, that's up to you. But what you're saying is EXACTLY as if a black South African said 'I don't care about Nelson Mandela, he did nothing for me'. Or if a black American said 'pfft, what difference did the civil rights movement make anyway?'>>

See, that is where I have the advantage I know what it is like to be a biracial women and the distinct and unique experience of being an american biracial woman. I recognize that the civil rights movement helped but, Martin Luther King was not the civil rights movement and neither was Rosa Parks,they were just two people who thought better of themselves and others and quietly said no to being treated like dogs and worse.

Terry O'Neill is not the feminist movement, she is not Queen Bee. I dont OWE anything to the feminist movement I am grateful to the good people, the quiet individuals who stood up and said no to being treated like second class citizens and the woman who raised me. I OWE NOTHING to anyone man or woman on this planet earth.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-20-2009
Fri, 02-12-2010 - 7:42pm

Are you under the mistaken impression that only women can be feminists?


<< the right to vote...>>


That would be thanks to the 19th amendment NOT the feminist movement and due to the signatures, approval and efforts of some MEN again.


Yep and those men were feminists! Just as some white people fought on behalf of black Americans and just as straight people have fought on behalf of those who are gay, so, too, have men fought to help women gain their rights.


Umm no,
I believe that was Board Vs. Brown. this was decided by nine MEN at the time. and Wayyyyyy before a women's movement.


Before you go accusing EnglishRose of knowing nothing of American history, I think you should probably take a look back in your text book, too. Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-04-2004
Fri, 02-12-2010 - 8:09pm
Thank you for this post. I was going to do a similar, basic history lesson, and I'm glad I had the forethought to read ahead. ;O)
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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-28-2008
Fri, 02-12-2010 - 8:24pm

<>

Nope they just happen to be people who wanted to see the right thing done they do not need to be labeled or swallowed whole by the MONSTER that is any women's movement first or second wave.

Again a few people quietly said no to things they saw and didn't like THEY are NOT a movement they are people.

<>>

Ahh my mistake,I still do not believe these women were feminists in any way they just wanted to make life better and you are the one who insists they be labeled that.

<>>

I actually do know about those I know all about since Imm helping my husband study for the california bar exam.

<>

I have no use for the women's movement personally I fight my own battles thank you. but I happen to agree with some of the things that society at large do struggle with. I simply refuse to give feminist or women's movement crap another thought really. I have read it back in the 80's when it started to really go down hill. the sad part is that the women's movement used to have something to say now they are just sad. Again where are the presidents of NOW or other organizations when AY systematically drown her 5 children or when Susan Smith rolled her car into the lake with her two helpless babies strapped in the back? Or when women batter and kill their husbands? You think women have cornered the market on rape victimhood? Ask anyone who has been in a prison about it I'm sure their take on it will be quite eye opening. If the Tim Tebow ad were arranged differently and Tim's mother tackled him would it still be considered DV? would those poor hapless victims out there be offended then? It seems to me that the women's movement is conspicuously silent when women are the aggressors case in point MKL and her student,If a man had kids with his 12 year old rape victim would we be so accepting of a marriage between the two?

It's disgusting.

<>

WHy I thank you for your "kind" critique of my posts but I plan to stay as I am.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-17-2007
Fri, 02-12-2010 - 10:41pm

Okay, I've just got to step in here.

Ever heard of Susan B Anthony? Elizabeth Cady Stanton? Alice Paul? These women fought for all the things you say were done by men, before the "feminist" movement. And these women most certainly were feminists, of what is commonly called the "first wave." Let's take, for example, the nineteenth amendment, something you say had nothing to do with the feminist movement. Susan B Anthony was out in Seneca Falls, New York, campaigning tirelessly for the right of women to vote. She was most definitely a feminist. Just because it took a further 72 years to make it into law doesn't mean that there weren't FEMINISTS working tirelessly to convince the men involved that it was only fair to give women the vote. Alice Paul was one of the ones at the end, who went from state to state seeking votes to ensure an amendment would pass. She was most definitely a feminist.

And what about Margaret Sanger? Would you not consider her a feminist? She worked for years, even while in exile in England, to combat the Comstock laws that since the 1870s had prevented anyone from distributing literature teaching women how to prevent pregnancy. She had seen her mother suffer through 18 pregnancies and wanted to ensure that women would be able to decide when they wanted to get pregnant. But it took a fight of several years to overthrow those laws that would allow women to have access to contraceptive information. She was, without a doubt, a feminist.

So, what of the other things you mentioned? You make the erroneous assumption that prior to the latter half of the twentieth century, feminists had no influence in the laws that improved the lives of women. Clearly, by this evidence shown in only two examples, that assessment is wrong. Feminists, although they were not acting under the organizations you recognize and denigrate today, certainly had a major effect on the laws you see for your benefit today. You vote because of them. You go to school because of them. You can take birth control and get information about preventing pregnancy because of them. Yes, because of feminists.

But I will say that you were correct on one thing in an earlier post. In many states, up until the 90s, domestic violence was either legal or tacitly legal (meaning there were laws against it but they weren't enforced). Anyone wishing to get a grounding in domestic violence law state-wise in the U.S. should read Ann Jones's "Next Time, She'll Be Dead." Admittedly it was published in 1995 but it details a lot of problems with the laws that were still on the books even then.




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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-17-2007
Fri, 02-12-2010 - 10:42pm
I wish I had. But I brought in Alice Paul and Margaret Sanger as well, who are always worth a mention. :-)




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