Transnational fem. and women's repro...

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-17-2007
Transnational fem. and women's repro...
3
Thu, 02-18-2010 - 5:34pm

Sorry, too long. Transnational feminism and women's reproductive rights. Here is a current debate among feminists.

Certainly, I think most of us would argue that women worldwide deserve information about, if not necessarily access to, information about reproduction, contraception, and abortion. Here are some talking points:

1. Do women worldwide have the right to contraceptive and abortion information and services?
2. To what extent do local beliefs, customs and laws outweigh a local woman's "rights" to these things?
3. What is the best way to help women in developing countries get access to this information and services?

There are lots of different approaches and answers to these questions from various feminist communities and organizations, but before I weigh in, I'd like to see what everyone else thinks.




Powered by CGISpy.com


Thanks to Spencer (gespenst) for the beautiful signatures!
Lilypie 2nd Birthday PicLilypie 2nd Birthday Ticker
Photobucket
Photobucket




Powered by CGISpy.com


Thanks

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-20-2009

1. Do women worldwide have the right to contraceptive and abortion information and services?


I believe so, yes. I'm sure it's much more difficult than a yes or no answer, but in theory I believe all women have the right to all forms of health care, including reproductive care.



2. To what extent do local beliefs, customs and laws outweigh a local woman's "rights" to these things?


I don't believe they outweigh them at all, just as I don't believe that local beliefs or customs in the United States should outweigh a woman's right to choose here.



3. What is the best way to help women in developing countries get access to this information and services?


Here is where I'm just not sure. Developing countries need so much help in the arena of health care that I'm just not sure how helpful it would be to solely address abortion. If a woman in a developing country can have less children and children who are more healthy, clearly that's going to affect how well she can care for them and provide for them which will snowball into how good of a life they can have and so on. But how to go about doing that? I'm definitely not going to pretend like I know the right answer to that one.


I think access to condoms and the importance of them can help. I also think breastfeeding is super important both to provide important nutrients to the children and as a way to naturally space children.

Image and video hosting by TinyPicLilypie Breastfeeding TickerPhotobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket
Image and video hosting by TinyPicLilypie Breastfeeding Ticker
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003

The best way to help women regarding their reproductive health is to education them. In fact, it has been shown that educating women does more to improve the economic status of their families, reduces the chances their children will become involved in crime and/or terrorism, and increases pressures for peace within that society.

So, it is entirely to a society's benefit that women are educated, even if it goes against the local beliefs, customs, and laws.

The 3 Day

Sandy
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-06-2009

<1. Do women worldwide have the right to contraceptive and abortion information and services?>

Yes, definitely.

<2. To what extent do local beliefs, customs and laws outweigh a local woman's "rights" to these things?>

I don't think they affect her rights, but I do think they would dictate the method of delivery.

<3. What is the best way to help women in developing countries get access to this information and services?>

I don't think there's a universal answer, as this would HUGELY depend on the local beliefs/customs/laws in that particular place, as above.

Meez 3D avatar avatars games