Whats the most months should a female be

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-16-2004
Whats the most months should a female be
86
Wed, 06-20-2007 - 3:56am
Whats the most months should a female be a to terminate her pregnancy
my opinion is 0-3moths and if they only have less then two cuz to many women use this as birth control and its not so i think it should be last resort

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
Wed, 06-20-2007 - 4:37am
I think the current standard of viability is fair.
baby siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2007
Wed, 06-20-2007 - 8:03am
There shouldn't be restrictions put on abortion.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
Wed, 06-20-2007 - 8:20am
None at all?
baby siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2007
Wed, 06-20-2007 - 8:34am

Nope.

What kind of limitations would you put on abortion?

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
Wed, 06-20-2007 - 8:40am

What kind of limitations would you put on abortion?>

Personally I think elective til viability is reasonable. Where abortion is readily available, I don't see why a woman would need to wait until post-viability to decide that she doesn't want a baby. Of course, I'm speaking from my perspective in a country where abortion is easily available & often free - YMMV.

Tell me about no-limitation abortion and why it would be a good thing.

baby siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2007
Wed, 06-20-2007 - 8:51am

Who determines when viability occurs? Just because at some point a fetus survives outside the womb at 21 weeks, does that automatically *lower* the bar, so to speak? What percentage of pre term births does it have to be to be considered viable?

By putting limitations on abortion you are forcing women who are in search of a medically necessary abortion to fight he legal system. If a woman finds out her fetus will be born with a serious disability, she should have the right to abort and some of these things aren't found until second trimester.

I don't believe there is ANY way possible to predict the number of specific situations that could arise where the law would have to be *broken* in order for a woman to have an abortion.

I also don't believe there are women out there deciding at 35 weeks gestation that they no longer want to have a baby and at the same time that there are doctors out there willing to do an abortion on a fetus that age under those conditions.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2007
Wed, 06-20-2007 - 8:52am

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I very much admire the sensibility of the system you have over there in the UK. As much as I understand the need for states' rights, our current patchwork creates confusion and desperation among women seeking abortion services and ultimately delays abortions that will happen, and creates legal snarls for women crossing state boarders.

In the UK it is essentially elective until 24 weeks, and after that allowable for serious harm to the mother's health or if the fetus is at substantial risk of serious handicap. Girls under 16 need two doctors to sign off that she is adequately informed and emotionally mature enough to make a competent decision. In stark contrast to the US, in some areas an under-16 may not consent to carry a pregnancy without her parents, who may be able to authorize an abortion in her best interests.

For a variety of reasons, less than 1% of all abortions in the UK occur after 20 weeks, at which point they occur mostly for health reasons undiagnosable until that point, or in young women in denial.

I will paste those details here for the general eddification:
http://www.patient.co.uk/showdoc/40000047/
(please correct me if I've stumbled onto an outdated set)
(ToP stands for termination of pregnancy)

Legal requirements 1967 Abortion Act allows termination before 24 weeks of gestation if it:

* Reduces the risk to a woman's life or
* Reduces the risk to her physical or mental health or
* Reduces the risk to physical or mental health of her existing children or
* The baby is at substantial risk of being seriously mentally or physically handicapped

Most terminations are performed under the second of these criteria.

There is no upper limit on gestational time if there is:

* Risk to the mother's life
* Risk of grave, permanent injury to the mother's physical/mental health (allowing for reasonably foreseeable circumstances)
* Substantial risk that, if the child were born, it would suffer such physical or mental abnormalities as to be seriously handicapped. Such ToPs must be conducted in an NHS hospital.

<1% ToPs are performed after 20 weeks. This is usually following amniocentesis or in very young girls who have concealed or not recognised the pregnancy.

ToP in girls < 16 years old Form HSA1 must be signed by 2 doctors in girls under 16 years age. GMC guidelines are that girls <16 years may be able to reach an informed decision depending on their capacity to comprehend everything involved in the procedure. However, in those cases where a competent underage girl refuses termination, it may be possible for a parent or guardian to authorise termination if it is the girl's best interests . In Scotland, parental consent cannot be given if a competent girl has refused termination.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
Wed, 06-20-2007 - 8:59am

A majority, I suppose.

I specified 'elective' until viability. Medically necessary is a different situation altogether.

You don't think 'elective' and 'medically necessary' work as separate categories with separate rules?

My understanding of your no-limitation rule is that if a woman decided at 35, 38 or 40 wks that she no longer wished to have the baby, she could abort. Have I misunderstood?

baby siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2004
Wed, 06-20-2007 - 9:02am
I quite like the English system wrt abortion too :o)
baby siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2007
Wed, 06-20-2007 - 9:07am

By stating this:

"I don't believe there is ANY way possible to predict the number of specific situations that could arise where the law would have to be *broken* in order for a woman to have an abortion."

I don't believe there need be seperate (any) rules.

What I'm saying is pretty clear. I don't believe there should be any limitations. I also don't believe women are wanting/obtaining elective abortions at 35, 38 or 40 weeks gestations. I also don't believe they'd be able to find a doctor willing to perform one.

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