BFing moms should not drink

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
BFing moms should not drink
50
Tue, 09-06-2011 - 2:53pm

Some say it is better that moms continue to BFand only drink in moderation - some wonder if mom should be drinking at all while she is BFing?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Wed, 09-21-2011 - 1:16pm

http://my.clevelandclinic.org/healthy_living/breastfeeding/hic_over-the-counter_medications_and_breastfeeding.aspx

This link to the Cleveland Clinic has a good summary of medications and breastfeeding. Some snip-its:

Which medications are NOT safe to take while breastfeeding?

Some of the medications that require temporary weaning are those that contain radioactive compounds and drugs used to treat cancer.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Wed, 09-21-2011 - 1:04pm

Maybe you missed my point? It seems you have restated you point almost the same way as you did the first time.

You don't need to take the same level of precautions during breastfeeding as you do when you are pregnant. There are two primary reasons for that 1) most of the major development of the baby happens in the first half of the pregnancy. Therefore early pregnancy is a time when a woman should be very vigilant about everything she does. 2) Breastfeeding is SO much better than formula that making arbitrary rules about what a woman who is breastfeeding should or should not do is a moot point.

So, "stopping drinking" is unnecessarily extreme. In and of itself eliminating alcohol is no biggie for most woman, but when you state that women must be vigilant about every little thing, it can become overwhelming and might influence people to breastfeed for shorter amounts of time. Given the importance of breastfeeding, women should be able to balance their well-being against the baby's needs and occasionally be less than perfect healthwise.

You could talk to a doctor about meds and alternatives, but as Charleen stated many doctors know little about breastfeeding and medications. IMO, it is better to go to reliable sources (Hale, LactMed) and present that information to the doctor for a conversation. Of course, when you go to those resources you find out that very few medications are actually problematic during breastfeeding. So again, presenting breastfeeding as a behavior that requires substantial concern on the part of the mother is misguided.

One of the many "benefits" to breastfeeding is a volume of protective components which ameliorate that effect of all kinds of environmental contaminents. The research on PCB's is interesting.

I am making any sense? Or did I just say the same thing over again.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-03-2001
Wed, 09-21-2011 - 11:02am

I think you missed my point, or I didn't make it clearly,.

I KNOW that breast milk offers benefits to the child, and to the mother-child bond. What I meant was I think any woman who drinks whould think twice about what she might be exposing her child to. Stop drinking while you breast feed --- you stopped when you were pregnant...

And talk to a doctor about whether or not meds you are on will have an impact on the child through breast milk --- find out if there are alternatives to taking those meds before you decide.

True, many doctors are fixed in their ways but surely they can at least give you info on whether meds/alcohol can get into the breast milk and they you make your own decisions based on your needs, desires for your baby.



CL for "

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Tue, 09-20-2011 - 9:28pm

I think a woman who is contemplating breast-feeding should be VERY careful.

Generally, speaking I disagree. Since the alternative to breastfeeding is less than ideal, getting overly concerned about the nuances of breastfeeding is counterproductive.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008
Tue, 09-20-2011 - 4:01pm

OK, as a biologist (and NOT a MOM, breast-feeding or otherwise), since so much of what a woman takes orally (alcohol, drugs/medications, etc.) end up in breast milk, I think a woman who is contemplating breast-feeding should be VERY careful. Talk to her OB/GYN and find out --- are there things she should avoid to avoid passing them on to her baby? Better safe than sorry...

While it is is generally a good idea to know what things you should not generally consume while BF'ing, you have to be careful where you seek advice in this issue. For some substances, such as alcohol, there is plenty of info you can read about it's consumption when BF'ing without having to consult a doctor specifically. In fact, due to the fact that a few doctors still take the position that nay alcohol consumption while BF'ing is risky they will push the BF'ing mother to either stop drinking completely or switch to formula, without considering the fact that formula has risks too. In this case, it's best too see what pro-BF'ing medical experts have to say on the issue and decide from that whether to drink at all as a BF'ing mom. Now when it comes to other substances, such as

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Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Tue, 09-20-2011 - 12:54pm
thatyank wrote:

I think a woman who is contemplating breast-feeding should be VERY careful. Talk to her OB/GYN and find out --- are there things she should avoid to avoid passing them on to her baby? Better safe than sorry...

True - though it would be more helpful if her ob/gyn had accurate information to pass on to her. Unfortunately most just say if you need meds or want to drink frquently, just use formula. Not taking into account the risks of formula.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-03-2001
Tue, 09-20-2011 - 11:55am

OK, as a biologist (and NOT a MOM, breast-feeding or otherwise), since so much of what a woman takes orally (alcohol, drugs/mediactions, etc.) end up in breast milk, I think a woman who is contemplating breast-feeding should be VERY careful. Talk to her OB/GYN and find out --- are there things she should avoid to avoid passing them on to her baby? Better safe than sorry...



CL for "

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Fri, 09-16-2011 - 9:28am

The key is that their is generally not a firm definition of "normal drinking " vs "problem drinking" vs "alcoholism" and thus what constitutes each is generally based on the individual and their behavior. On average though, drinking more then one drink per day for women or two drinks per day for men, is considered non-moderate drinking as a possible sign of problem drinking.

Yes, that' s a pretty good summary of what I've been trying to say.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008
Fri, 09-16-2011 - 4:00am
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If a person drink 10 or more drinks per week due to an addiction to alcohol then they area alcoholics. But if they do so simply out of choice and are capable going weeks without drinking should they choose then it would be classified more as "problem drinking", a classification that can precede alcoholism, though it does not always result in alcoholism. Any level of drinking that cause health or social problems can be classified as "problem drinking" without addiction be an requirement. Alcoholism generally means an addiction to alcohol. If you consume a large quantity of alcohol within a few hours then that is "binge drinking". For women, since moderate drinking is generally classified as one drink per day, 10 drinks per week on a regular bases would be classified as problem drinking in many cases though not all as some women can handle alcohol better then others. An occasional week of 10 drinks would not however be considered problem drinking in and of itself unless it led to bad behavior such as violence. The key is that their is generally not a firm definition of "normal drinking " vs "problem drinking" vs "alcoholism" and thus what constitutes each is generally based on the individual and their behavior. On average though, drinking more then one drink per day for women or two drinks per day for men, is considered non-moderate drinking as a possible sign of problem drinking. There are people who appose drinking at all or only believe in extreme moderation when drinking and they tend to define any drinking beyond a couple drink s a week as excessive and problematic so that clouds the issue.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-13-2008
Thu, 09-15-2011 - 10:36am

Alcoholism to me is more about the point where you have an addiction - a need that you find very difficult to fight with will power. A need that even if the level of drinking is affecting yourself and those around you negatively, it is very hard to stop, as it is in control of you rather than the other way.

Some people could be defined as alcoho,lics even if they do not drink every day - eg if they get to the point where they cannot help but go on destructive sessions of binge drinking. Others can be alcoholics if they are having some alcohol every day. There can be patterns such as drinking early in the day, or drinking alone, but these do not always occur.

For a breastfeeding mother, providing she knows that alcohol is not a good idea for her baby, then if she continues to drink, it is quite possible that she has the lessened personal control that would be typical of addiction. Or maybe she just does not believe evidence, and does not think it is that bad.

But then, when I had my children in the 80s, it was not considered as bad as it is now. A lot more research on effects has been done I guess, is the difference.

Teresa

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