Brand Name Formula & Marketing

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Brand Name Formula & Marketing
13
Fri, 08-10-2012 - 11:37am

From a new website - StoreBrand Formula.com:

It's worth repeating: All infant formula manufactured in the United States offers the same levels of required nutrients in order to take the best care of your baby.

Q. How can Store Brand formulas cost so much less, but still offer the same level of nutrition?

National brand manufacturers know that purchasing infant formula is a complex, emotional decision. So they spend literally hundreds of millions of dollars in marketing every year trying to attract new moms. They use expensive tactics like television advertising and direct mail to get “high value” coupons and samples into mom's hands, before she even gives birth. National brand manufacturers know that if I mom initiates formula feeding with their brand, moms get mentally “hooked” on these expensive products. All of these marketing costs are ultimately reflected in their retail prices.

So why the price difference between store brand and national brand formulas?

The main reason for the price differential is that national brands spend exorbitant amounts on marketing. National brand marketers understand that moms and all parents sometimes act out of guilt and that perpetuating the myth that one formula is better for their baby than another is all some moms need to hear to spend more.

Infant Feeding Choices: No Guilt Necessary

According to a study of 1,900 expectant first-time moms and those with kids one year old and younger, more than 40% of them feel guilty about using formula instead of breastfeeding, which may be why so many of them say that they're willing to overspend on formula. Sixty-eight percent (68%) believe a heftier price tag for formula means that it's a better quality product than store brands, such as those sold by Target and Walgreens.

That's not true.

According to the Food and Drug Administration, all formula marketed in the U.S. must meet the same nutrient specifications, which are set at levels to fulfill the needs of infants. You're not paying more for better quality; you're paying more – up to $600.00 a year - for national brand packaging and advertising.


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Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Fri, 08-10-2012 - 12:21pm

Found this on Facebook today:

breastmilk.jpg

Public Health, doctors, Lactation Consultants, moms, etc. have nothing to prove...the burden of proof is on the formula companies.

When something is authentic, natural and superior--an imitation must prove it can accomplish what the original does...formula cannot...even if they continue to use phrases like, "closer to breastmilk" it does not make it true.

We must demand truth and transparency in advertising in order to encourage society to support moms who cannot breastfeed with better options...milk depots, milk banks and ingredient requirements for formula companies should all be addressed.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Fri, 08-10-2012 - 2:47pm

Did I just read that the women who buy expensive, brand name formula are more likely to "feel guilty" about not breastfeeding?

Is there a likelihood that the marketing that led them to use brand name formula instead of store brands also led them to feel "guilty about not breastfeeding"? Marketing of brand named formula is based on "complex, emotions" . Any chance the marketing encourages those mothers to identify those "complex emotions" as guilt? Any chance the marketing suggests that the "Guilt" should be attribute to Lactivism? Hmmm.

I wonder why no one has thought of this before. **wink**

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Fri, 08-10-2012 - 2:48pm

Speaking of Facebook, where's the "Like" button?!:smileyhappy:

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Fri, 08-10-2012 - 3:14pm

Here you go!

Like Button.jpg

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Fri, 08-10-2012 - 3:58pm

Um, like?!

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2010
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 8:13am
nisupulla wrote:

Did I just read that the women who buy expensive, brand name formula are more likely to "feel guilty" about not breastfeeding?


No.

You read that in a study 40% of moms felt guilty about using formula, and 68% of moms believe more expensive formula is better.  The study (as described in this article) did not address whether there was any correlation between those things.  It could be that the moms in the 40% who felt guilty were more likely to be in the 68% who believed more expensive formula was better, or it could be that the moms in the 40% were more likely to be in the other 32% who didn't.  The study (as described in the article) simply did not address that.

Is there a likelihood that the marketing that led them to use brand name formula instead of store brands also led them to feel "guilty about not breastfeeding"? Marketing of brand named formula is based on "complex, emotions" . Any chance the marketing encourages those mothers to identify those "complex emotions" as guilt? Any chance the marketing suggests that the "Guilt" should be attribute to Lactivism? Hmmm.

It's possible, though I think even if there were a correlation, a more likely explanation is that the moms who are most likely to feel guilt are those in the higher socioeconomic/education levels where breastfeeding is more expected, and those people are more likely to be able to afford name-brand formula. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 8:36am

Welcome back!

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 8:42am

More snip-its from a different website:

The reason they're less expensive is that the manufacturers of generic formula don't spend millions of dollars on research or on marketing, AND they don't give away free samples the way some other formula companies do.

and

I'm a vet of the formula industry, and work for one of the 2 big formula manufacturers here in the US. Having gone through extensive product training, talking with our company docs, sitting in long sales conferences I have learned one huge, important detail about infant formula. It's literally coke and pepsi,.... In the past, some Pede's frowned on store brand because of lack of samples

Kinda like they used to frown upon breastfeeding, eh?

and this one just for humor

I have larger ariolas than I do nipple, so therefore my son had a VERY difficult time latching on..

What the ?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2010
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 8:49am
witch_power wrote:

From a new website - StoreBrand Formula.com:

It's worth repeating: All infant formula manufactured in the United States offers the same levels of required nutrients in order to take the best care of your baby.

. . .

According to the Food and Drug Administration, all formula marketed in the U.S. must meet the same nutrient specifications, which are set at levels to fulfill the needs of infants. You're not paying more for better quality; you're paying more – up to $600.00 a year - for national brand packaging and advertising.

These statements are true, but somewhat misleading. (Don't forget that these people are also trying to sell formula.)

All formula marketed in the U.S. must meet certain general nutrient specifications (a minimum and maximum amount of certain nutrients), but that does not mean that there are not nutritionally significant differences between formulas.

For example, as we've discussed here before, formulas do not have to have the same type of sugar, and some use lactose, while others use glucose or other sugars.  It is not irrational to choose a formula that has lactose over one that has other sugars because lactose is the sugar in breast mlik, even if it has not been conclusively proven that either has a significant effect.  If there's a price tag associated with choosing lactose over another sugar, the mom has to decide whether that's worth it given her financial situation.

Of course, if there's a generic formula that's equivalent to the one you want, ingredient-wise, then buying the brand name is just paying for marketing.

 

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 9:18am
nisupulla wrote:
In the past, some Pede's frowned on store brand because of lack of samples

Kinda like they used to frown upon breastfeeding, eh?


They frowned on breastfeeding because they didn't get any free samples to hand out? LOL


and this one just for humor

I have larger ariolas than I do nipple, so therefore my son had a VERY difficult time latching on..

What the ?

When  I was working as a volunteer on the maternity floor, helping new moms to nurse, I was surprised to find that some women did have very large areolas - made mine look tiny!

I remember being told that you had to get all of the areola in the baby's mouth, so if moms like that had tried to do that, it would be difficult!

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