Breastfeeding could prevent ADHD

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Breastfeeding could prevent ADHD
9
Fri, 08-09-2013 - 5:07pm

The researchers found a clear link between rates of breastfeeding and the likelihood of developing ADHD, even when typical risk factors were taken into consideration. Children who were bottle-fed at three months of age were found to be three times more likely to have ADHD than those who were breastfed during the same period. These results have been published inBreastfeeding Medicine.

While researchers do not yet know why breastfeeding has an impact on the future development of ADHD -- it could be due to the breast milk itself, or the special bond formed between mother and baby during breastfeeding, for example – they believe this research shows that breastfeeding can have a protective effect against the development of the disorder, and can be counted as an additional biological advantage for breastfeeding.

Read more: http://www.sciencecodex.com/breastfeeding_could_prevent_adhd-116171

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Fri, 08-09-2013 - 6:13pm

Ready for a shock? I think, entirely based on the headline, this idea that breastfeeding can reduce ADHD is bogus.

OK, I will now read the article. Let's see if I have to eat my hat.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Fri, 08-09-2013 - 6:19pm

http://commonhealth.wbur.org/2013/07/breastfeeding-may-lower-risk-of-adhd-study-finds

I think this more technical review is a more tentative. The sibling control is very interesting, either way.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Fri, 08-09-2013 - 6:23pm
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Fri, 08-09-2013 - 6:32pm

"ADHD is a highly heritable disorder. However, it can also be acquired, and some individuals have a combination of genetic and acquired ADHD.....

The behaviors associated with ADHD can also arise from environmental factors that disrupt normal brain growth, before, during, and after birth. Such insults give rise to behaviors that are indistinguishable from the behaviors seen in ADHD of genetic origin. It is not unusual to see individuals who have both a genetic and an acquired form."

Ok, then. Hat chomping - begin - now...



iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Sat, 08-10-2013 - 7:21am

At some point, this whole ennobling breastmilk has got to stop.  Breastmilk does not cure everything and probably anything.  I regard with all due suspicion any "study" published in Breastfeeding Medicine.  When I breastfed years ago, the best breastmilk was supposed to do was increase IQ points.  Of course, I never believed that one.  Now, it's like...cancer.  I mean really.

Very few moms breastfeed for any meaningful time.  So of course it's easy to say that not breastfeeding for any meaningful time is more likely to end up in ADHD.  They're missing that whole causation link I was told was kinda important in school.

These ridiculous pronouncements and the women this week especially who whipped it out (and filmed it) in public just weaken the "cause."   They make those of us who did breastfeed look more and more like fools, like saps suckered into the Wizard's plotting!

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-10-2013 - 7:56am

"They make those of us who did breastfeed look more and more like fools, like saps suckered into the Wizard's plotting!"

Interesting comment. I think that is exactly what the media does. Mulling it over.


Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Mon, 08-12-2013 - 11:34am
While I would love to say that this was our case, since ADHD runs in both sides of our family, as well as autism in DH's side of the family, it was not the case. My middle child is very much ADHD in spite of BFing for 26 months. Now if it reduced it some, that is great, but I can't imagine her being much worse than she is...
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Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Mon, 08-12-2013 - 1:25pm

My oldest son was extremely ADHD - to the point that some professionals wanted him institutionalized. I wouldn't and my family did suffer. But what we tried was diet related - back then it was all about food rotation and elimination - and for him it really did help. It didn't make him perfect, but helped him to be liveable.

Lately I have been reading about low carb and ADHD - and since I have been eating low carb, I have found it helped with my own symptoms. So I can't help wondering if it would have helped him?

I imagine the answer is different for each family - and I know how hard it can be to completely change a family's diet. I would spend hours in the kitchen, often crying while I baked and cooked everything from scratch. But not havign to deal with his hourly outburts and damaging behavour kept me going...

Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Wed, 08-14-2013 - 9:43am

We put Emma on a natural ADD supplement, upped her Omega-3 intake and have moved towards a gluten free diet and eliminating most processed sugars and foods and it has definitely made a difference.  But like you, I have spent nights crying after the kids went to bed after working all day, coming home to make a dinner that just about no one in the house would eat, or 2 out of 5 members, and not even the one that it was intended for.  Its been a hard journey, but like you, the improvement in behavior has kept me going.

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