Breastfeeding "too long" may increase iron deficiency?

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2010
Breastfeeding "too long" may increase iron deficiency?
2
Mon, 04-22-2013 - 11:13am

http://guardianlv.com/2013/04/breastfeeding-too-long-may-increase-iron-deficiency/

Breastfeeding too long may Increase Iron Deficiency

Breastfeeding, one of the healthiest choices to choose when you are a new mom, but now research shows breastfeeding for too long may reduce your child’s iron levels. Breastfeeding a child gives the new mom and child a special way of bonding like no other. During those moments you are able to connect with your child, cuddle, and nurture your child in a very special way compared to bottle-feeding. As a fact, breastfeeding can help reduce some breast and ovarian cancers, and even in the first few days of life, your child receives more nutrition from breast milk than from a formula.

Once you are a new mom, breast milk is known as liquid gold for your baby, it is very rich with nutrients and antibodies that your child will not receive from a formula. The first produced breast milk is known as colostrum, as your baby grows the colostrum changes to what is known as mature milk. Mature milk after about the third to fifth day preceding birth is has exactly the right amounts of fat, sugar, water, and protein your baby needs to grow healthy and strong. Not only are you giving your child a ton of great nutrients and antibodies but you have just saved yourself a ton of money from all that formula your baby would have already went through. Typically, a new mom is advised to breastfeed for only the first three months of the new babies’ life.

By now, you may be asking yourself, what is so bad about breastfeeding if I give my baby everything he or she needs? A study conducted with 1647 children ranging in age from one to 6 years shows that each month the child is breast-fed iron deficiency increases by 4.8%. Lead Author Jonathon L. Maguire, MD and his colleagues reported in an online-published article in Pediatrics on April 15. Although, these findings are not meant for mothers to interrupt them, as breast-feeding is bad, it merely suggests that breast-feeding should be kept to a shorter period for the child, roughly three to six months of the child’s life.

Health Care professionals always suggest if the mother to be is comfortable with breast-feeding that it is crucial for the child to receive approximately six months of breast-feeding. As you well know, breast-feeding will give your child many more nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and antibodies that formula will not. Formula is not bad for a child either, but with breast milk your child receives just the right nutrition on a very balanced level and if that is not a plus side enough, breast milk is gentler on the child’s stomach and you have a less chance of colic.

What it bowels right down to with Breast-feeding is, the shorter length you breastfeed the less likely your child has an iron deficiency down the road. Although, many mothers will agree that breastfeeding is a joyous time for both the mom and baby as the connection between the two grow much stronger. The news that breast feeding for too long can cause iron deficiencies may have mothers thinking twice before they breast feed their child for a long set of months.

Mom’s will this change your decision to breast-feed your child?

Kevali


 Photobucket

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008
All this study really says is not that moms BF too long but that they simply need to make sure their toddler gets more iron rich foods in their diet and that they don't assume the child is getting all the iron they need from BF'ing alone. Unfortunately, the article above completely misreads that takeaway to be that you shouldn't BF for longer then 3-6 months. That is not what the study suggest and it completely ignores the fact you can get more then enough iron from solid foods and iron supplements without having to stop BF'ing.

Photobucket

Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999

I read that article yesterday and no, it wouldn't have changed my mind one bit about BFing, or extended BFing my DDs.  IMO it wasn't a big enough percentage to worry me, and after they hit 1, they are beginning to eat some solid foods and if you are proactive enough, its easy to get a bit of extra iron into their diet if you are cognicent of the fact that your iron stores as a BFing mother may be lower.

Photobucket