Cruel jab at moms who don't breastfeed??

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Cruel jab at moms who don't breastfeed??
17
Tue, 02-05-2013 - 3:18pm


Do you think removing pictures of babies from formula ads is a "cruel jab at moms who don't breastfeed"?

From the article:

- feel like social outcasts

- No more adorable blue-eyed babies on formula cans

- It's almost like they think feeding a baby formula is some sort of crime.

- this just seems so outrageous and unnecessary

- moms who don't breastfeed are "frowned upon," if not flat-out scolded

- the lactation consultant pacing back and forth outside my hospital room after I had my son like some sort of Nazi

- a mother should never be made to feel like she's doing something wrong because of how she chooses to nourish her child

- Making moms feel like bad parents if they don't feed their babies the way the government wants them

- isn't going to accomplish a damn thing.

Banning Babies From Formula Ads Is a Cruel Jab at Moms Who Don't Breastfeed

Moms in Sweden who choose to formula feed their babies instead of breastfeeding them may feel like social outcasts pretty soon, because the country is considering banning babies' images from all baby formula ads.

Read more: http://thestir.cafemom.com/baby/146246/banning_babies_from_formula_ads

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Community Leader
Registered: 04-18-2003
Mon, 02-11-2013 - 11:13pm

For many working moms, Canada’s year-long parental-leave policy feels like a trap. It lures parents into believing that the country supports them and their babies, but it ultimately leaves ambitious moms scrambling for the careers they want.

That's very misleading. It's 35 weeks that can be split between BOTH parents. I know someone who had a baby and her husband took the 35 weeks because she hadn't worked in a year. I know someone else who had a big project every summer. They planned their baby, who obliging arrived in the spring. The dad worked from the home, so he took the spring and summer, she took the remaining weeks. She did a combination of breastfeeding, breastpumping and formula feeding. As she put it "I'm an equal opportunist. I equally pissed off feminists, traditionalists, breastfeeders and formula feeders".

Gail

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008
Fri, 02-08-2013 - 6:19pm
While I do see some bugs still, the board is working well enough for me to post again which is mainly why I was not posting before (that and the lack of people posting).

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Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Wed, 02-06-2013 - 6:25pm

Unfortunately the board bugs are mostly still there - and I don't blame anyone for getting frustrated!

But I kept checking in, just in case - I felt like giving up so many times. But maybe... just maybe... we can get the board going again now that we have some new people!

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008
Wed, 02-06-2013 - 6:23pm

Charleen - it's been a while! It's good to sse you here, debating again!

 I was waiting for the major bugs in the new message board software to be worked out and the fact that the board was largely dead for some while. Now that it has picked up a bit, I decided to join back in the conversation.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008
Wed, 02-06-2013 - 6:12pm

- feel like social outcasts

Oh please! Requiring formula can labels to remove cute babies and other cutesy pictures is not going to make FF mom's feel like social outcasts.

- No more adorable blue-eyed babies on formula cans

So what. It's doesn't prevent anyone from using formula so who cares.

- It's almost like they think feeding a baby formula is some sort of crime.

She is reading way to much into this. I'm know for a fact that they recognize that there are good reasons why some moms need to use formula so I can assure your they are not even close to trying to make FF'ing feel like a crime.

- this just seems so outrageous and unnecessary

Research has shown that in third world countries the cute babies on the cans of formula does indeed lead some moms to FF who would not have otherwise. While I can't say if the same is true for a country like Sweden or 1st world countries in general, I don't see any real downsides to this (for moms that is) so I say go ahead a ban the cure babies on the cans of formula.

- moms who don't breastfeed are "frowned upon," if not flat-out scolded

Not having cute babies on the cans of formula is not looking down on FF moms or scolding them. While there are indeed people who take that attitude, this will not result more of such people.

- the lactation consultant pacing back and forth outside my hospital room after I had my son like some sort of Nazi

Really?! Was her lactation consultant really doing the goose step back and forth becuase she was not BF'ing? I doubt her story is that accurate. Even if the LC was pacing back and forth, that hardly makes here Nazi and how does she know it was becuase she was not BF'ing and not over some other women who was struggling to BF and whom she was having trouble helping to do so. Given how stretched thing most hospital LC's are these days, I highly doubt she had the time to do much pacing outside her hospital room.

- a mother should never be made to feel like she's doing something wrong because of how she chooses to nourish her child

Again, like I said before, this is not going to result in FF moms feeling like they are doing something wrong, not unless people like this this author drum that feeling into the moms unnecessarily by causing people to read into the motives of this plan something that simply does not exist. But I do have to take issue with the above statement if you take it to it's logical conclusion. What she had just said is basically that even if a mom feeds her baby something less the nutritionally adequate then she should still not be made to feel guilty which I strongly disagree with. 

- Making moms feel like bad parents if they don't feed their babies the way the government wants them

There is good reason for the government to promote breastfeeding and promoting breastfeeding does not mean that moms who FF are bad mothers. If you have to use formula or choose yo use formula then it's up to you to come to terms with that. In that case of using it purely by choice, you should make sure your making a fully informed decision to do so and that your 100% comfortable with that. If you are then you won't feel like a bad mom becuase of BF promotion campaigns. If your not 100% comfortable with your choice  to FF then maybe you should reevaluate whether that is the right choice after all.

- isn't going to accomplish a damn thing.

I can't say what it will accomplish in a first world country like Sweden but I can say that she has no proof it will accomplish nothing. We will have to wait and see what the results are.

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Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Wed, 02-06-2013 - 12:18pm

I just can't imagine it. Working for myself, at home, I had to "go back to work" at 9 weeks with my youngest - and I found that so hard. I truly found it painful, to have to take my focus off him and put it into work. Even though he was right there.

I can't imagine what it must be like for moms that have to go back to working outside the home so quickly.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-04-2002
Wed, 02-06-2013 - 12:13pm
Very interesting perspective - thanks for posting that article. As an American I've long been jealous of the generous maternity leave policies of Canada and other countries. I only was able to get 12 weeks leave - unpaid.
Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Wed, 02-06-2013 - 11:00am

How Maternity Leave Is Failing Canadian Women

Increasing the birthrate. Letting mothers take care of their young children without damaging their careers. Extended maternity leave was enacted for all the right reasons. So what went wrong?

For many working moms, Canada’s year-long parental-leave policy feels like a trap. It lures parents into believing that the country supports them and their babies, but it ultimately leaves ambitious moms scrambling for the careers they want.

Read more: http://www.readersdigest.ca/health/family/pregnant-pause-how-maternity-leave-is-setting-canadian-mothers-back?page=0,4

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Wed, 02-06-2013 - 10:54am

thardy2001 wrote:
<p>Interesting articles, WP.  I'm more surprised by the "generous" (more than 6 months) of maternity leave it seems all moms in Sweden get. Taking up to a year off from work after each baby makes it near impossible for moms as a whole to stay relevant in the workforce. </p><p> More surprising is the expectation that moms stay home for up to a year.  *THAT'S* pressure to breastfeed in and of itself..</p>

That's interesting! Here in Canada we have a 1 year maternity leave for many years now, and I never thought of it as pressure to breastfeed. And most moms here don't after the first few months.

I thought it was a privilage to get to stay home and bond with your baby - breastfeed or formula. But I can see how some might think that it is pressure. I wonder how many use their year off here in Canada?

As a work-at-home mom, I never really thought about how staying home for a year for each child would affect their job? We do have legislation to hold the mother's job till she comes back, but I don't know how well that works in actual practice.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Wed, 02-06-2013 - 10:46am

Interesting articles, WP.  I'm more surprised by the "generous" (more than 6 months) of maternity leave it seems all moms in Sweden get. Surprised  Taking up to a year off from work after each baby makes it near impossible for moms as a whole to stay relevant in the workforce. 

That said, I don't think removing baby images from formula ads is a cruel jab at Swedish moms who use formula.  More surprising is the expectation that moms stay home for up to a year.  *THAT'S* pressure to breastfeed in and of itself.  The experts in Sweden seem certain that BF is the better way to go ~ and, years after BF'ing my own children ~ I'm still not 100% convinced.

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