Debate: It's mom's choice...

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Debate: It's mom's choice...
45
Mon, 06-20-2011 - 4:07pm

It is a mother's choice to choose a higher risk of obesity, higher risk of diabetes, higher risk of SIDs, higher risk of allergies.

Each child is born their own personal risk level of these illnesses and health risks. It may be a very high risk - resulting in death. It may be a medium risk, resulting in allergies and illness. It may be a low risk, with a few extra sniffles and ear infections. It may not be a concern at all for that child - he or she may be very healthly, never sick at all.

But it is a mother's right to choose to add to this personal level of risk for her child, if she wishes. Because it is her body and her child, and only she will have to deal with the consequences of her choice, if that risk should turn into reality.

And her child, of course.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-28-2011
Mon, 06-20-2011 - 5:03pm

I believe a loving mother would choose what is in the best interest of her child.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-13-2008
Tue, 06-21-2011 - 6:16am
srprsboy wrote:

I believe a loving mother would choose what is in the best interest of her child.

Avatar for pterodactyl
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-18-2003
Tue, 06-21-2011 - 10:40am

I make choices all the time that are not in the best interest of my child.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008
Tue, 06-21-2011 - 1:18pm

I'd have to agree with what both you and Teresa have said so far. Generally, if the mom has all the knowledge and the resources and such she make choices in the best interest of her child provided though that she is dealing with a choice she views as very important. If she is dealing with a choice she views as less important then she may make a decision she realizes is bot the best but for which she feels it's OK in this particular instance to put aside that concern for others, such a convenience or because the child wants it. I too have made decisions like feeding my child fast food or allowing him to watch more TV then usual where I know it not really in the his best best interest but since I don't make a habit of it I figure it's OK once in while. I don;t pretend to be a perfect parent or expect that I will always do 100% of the time what is in the best interest of my child in every circumstance. I try and make sure I reserve that for areas where I think it's really important while I prioritize some other areas as allowing for some occasional decisions where I may not always decide in the best interest of my child but where the downside of a decision is not that significant in the long run so I view it as being excusable. In fact one could argue that maybe in some instances doing what appears to be in the best interest of one's child 100% of the time in certain instances may not in the larger scheme of thing really be in their best interest.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Tue, 06-21-2011 - 8:15pm

It is absolutely the mother's right to choose this added level of risk for her child, but I sincerely believe that many women do not understand the risks they are taking.





Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Tue, 06-21-2011 - 10:33pm
finally.me wrote:

As long as a mother is fully informed of the risks, I fully support whatever decision she makes.

I agree - it is totally mom's choice. But it strikes me - that if we were talking about anything else, would we fully support whatever decision she makes?

If mom was fully informed about the risks of not using a car seat - would we fully support whatever decision she makes - even if she decided not to use a car seat at all?

If mom was fully informed about the risks of giving a baby straight cow's milk (some of us were raised that way and are "just fine") - would we fully support whatever decision she makes - even if she decides to start her baby on straight cow's milk at 3 months old?

If mom was fully informed about the risks of scheduled and limited feeding - BF or FF - would we fully support whatever decision she makes - even if she decides to only feed 3 times a day for 10 minutes, so her baby "won't get fat"?

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Tue, 06-21-2011 - 11:04pm

What I'm saying is, if she understands that formula is to breast milk what Sunny D is to an orange, and still choosing to feed her baby formula for any number of reasons, I'm not about to treat her any differently than if I saw a mom giving their child a cup of Sunny D.





Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Tue, 06-21-2011 - 11:09pm

It was more of a thought that your comment struck in me - not that I was suggesting that you should treat her any differently. Just wondering aloud why this choice is treated differently than others we makes as parents?

Does fully supporting whatever decision she makes mean the same thing as respecting that it was her choice to make?

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Tue, 06-21-2011 - 11:19pm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-13-2008
Wed, 06-22-2011 - 5:11am
finally.me wrote:

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