Do breastfeeding moms really need to be told this?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Do breastfeeding moms really need to be told this?
19
Fri, 05-17-2013 - 9:47am

Another blog.  This time by a woman who failed at breastfeeding and places "blame" on the "medical people," not herself.  She tried to breastfeed, but fell into post-partum depression because (?) she wasn't doing well breastfeeding.  Anyway, she would have been a power breastfeeder had a "medical" person simply told her 2 things: 1.) it's okay to use a little formula during the early days when the breastmilk has not come in, and 2.) a pacifier is okay and soothes a baby.

My question:  Do breastfeeding moms really need to be told either of these 2 things?  Do breastfeeding moms really need a Study to be told these 2 things? Aren't they pretty much common sense?

The blogger references a "study" ~ The study took 40 newborns who had lost 5 percent of their birth weight and whose moms' milk hadn't come in yet and split them into two groups. One got ELF (early limited formula). The other group was breastfed exclusively. When they checked back at 3 months, almost 80 percent of the babies who were given formula early on were breastfeeding exclusively. Forty-two percent of the moms who'd breastfed exclusively from the get-go were still doing so. 

http://thestir.cafemom.com/baby/155461/breastfeeding_moms_could_need_formula

Really?  A study to know this..."Medical" people?...Really?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2010

"She tried to breastfeed, but fell into post-partum depression because (?) she wasn't doing well breastfeeding."

I fell into post-partum depression because I wasn't doing well breastfeeding.  What's your question about that?

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006

>>My question:  Do breastfeeding moms really need to be told either of these 2 things?  Do breastfeeding moms really need a Study to be told these 2 things? Aren't they pretty much common sense?<<

Well, that's a refreshing change! Calling the breastfeeders stupid.

>>a woman who failed at breastfeeding and places "blame" on the "medical people," not herself. <<

Yeah, cuz we all know that it is always the mother's fault.

Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
If you have never breastfed before, and you are not surrounded by like minded people or anyone who has breastfed before, then no, I don't believe they are common sense at all. I tried to BF with my first one, my nurse at the hospital was horribly gruff with me, and I no idea what i was doing any my mother had not nursed any of us kids "because she didn't produce enough milk", I had no support and I didn't have any idea back then that either of these two things may help me. Now with my second 2, the middle one I did a ton of research and attended a BFing class before I had her to prepare and it was very helpful, and the second one I had enough experience. But no, I don't believe it is common sense necessarily. I suppose it would be common sense that if you are planning on BFing, to do the research ahead of time and try and get all the support you can, but that's a different thread...
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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002

arryl wrote:
If you have never breastfed before, and you are not surrounded by like minded people or anyone who has breastfed before, then no, I don't believe they are common sense at all. I tried to BF with my first one, my nurse at the hospital was horribly gruff with me, and I no idea what i was doing any my mother had not nursed any of us kids "because she didn't produce enough milk", I had no support and I didn't have any idea back then that either of these two things may help me. Now with my second 2, the middle one I did a ton of research and attended a BFing class before I had her to prepare and it was very helpful, and the second one I had enough experience. But no, I don't believe it is common sense necessarily. I suppose it would be common sense that if you are planning on BFing, to do the research ahead of time and try and get all the support you can, but that's a different thread...

So you never heard the expression "until your milk comes in"? 

Before my first, there wasn't this much on the internet about breastfeeding.  I had no breastfeeding support and I only read parts of "What to Expect..."  And I still knew of this expression.  Heck, even I can't go days without eating ~ I knew my baby could not suddenly go days without eating when she'd been "eating" for months.  I couldn't take that away.  So nurses or not, I knew I had to give the baby formula and stop when breastfeeding began.

If nothing else, when mom breastfeeds, the feeling that no breastmilk is coming out is there.  Great if you didn't have this issue ~ you wouldn't even need formula.  I had the feeling for days. 

Frankly, I could care less that the blogger claims she needed "medical" people and a study to tell her these things.  I think she's disingenuous and shouldn't actually blame anyone or anything.  Formula is not the devil's nourishment.  The idea of placing blame where none is due is pointless.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002

jessica765 wrote:
<p>"She tried to breastfeed, but fell into post-partum depression <em>because</em> (?) she wasn't doing well breastfeeding."</p><p>I fell into post-partum depression because I wasn't doing well breastfeeding.  What's your question about that?</p>

I question the blogger because post partum depression is so serious, they actually recommend you don't have another child.  That's serious.  It's not caused by feelings of sadness over not doing well breastfeeding but has many involved causes ~ many biological and/or hereditary. 

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010

thardy2001 wrote:
1.) it's okay to use a little formula during the early days when the breastmilk has not come in, and 2.) a pacifier is okay and soothes a baby.

My question:  Do breastfeeding moms really need to be told either of these 2 things?  Do breastfeeding moms really need a Study to be told these 2 things? Aren't they pretty much common sense?

To be honest... I don't think they are common sense at all. In fact, I think they are both wrong.

If the milk has not come in yet, baby should be nursed more often, not less. Not have their bellies filled with heavy formula. Not giving mom's breasts less stimulation because baby is feeding from a bottle and/or pacifier and sleeping more.

I am not suggesting that baby be starved if mom is truly not producing any milk - but I would imagine that would be incredibly rare. Most moms produce some milk after birth, and the more baby nurses, the more stimulation the mom's breasts get, the more milk they will produce.

How big is baby's stomach?

Day's 1 & 2, baby's stomach is the size of a thimble or marble (5 - 7 milliliters) - so the few drops of colustrum that mom's breasts make is more than enough.

5-7 mL = 0.16907 - 0.23670 us fl oz - so not even 1/4 of an ounce per feeding!

Day 3, baby's stomach is the size of a ping-pong ball or baby's fist (22 - 27 milliliters) - and baby needing to feed 8 - 12 times each day is perfectly normal.

22-27 mL = 0.74391 - 0.91298 us fl oz - so not even a full ounce per feeding!

By day 10, about the time your milk is fully in and supply established, baby's stomach is about the size of a large chicken egg (60 - 81 milliliters).

60-81 mL = 2.0288 - 2.7389 us fl oz - so not even 3 full ounces per feeding!

Source: http://typeaparent.com/infant-stomach-size-and-growth.html

As for pacifiers - they should not be used before 6 weeks old, beforebreastfeedingis fully established - if at all. Whenever a newborn needs to suck, that suck should be used to stimulate mom's breasts to produce milk. That's what suckling is for - milk production -  not to create an industry of pacifier sales.

And note that this comes from a single mom, whose milk did not come in for 13 days, and had breasts so sore she cried at every feeding and whose 2nd child was 5 months old before breastfeeding didn't hurt. So it's not that I haven't been there, and don't understand how hard it can be!

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2010

"I question the blogger because post partum depression is so serious, they actually recommend you don't have another child.  That's serious.  It's not caused by feelings of sadness over not doing well breastfeeding but has many involved causes ~ many biological and/or hereditary."

I have never heard or read of any health care professional who recommends that mothers with post-partum depression not have children subsequently.  I guess if it were a particularly serious case, that might be recommended for a particular mom.  Certainly individual moms may be scared of having other children--as I was.

Post-partum depression is serious and has many causes and contributing factors.  But if you think that breastfeeding failure cannot be a major cause of post-partum depression, you are mistaken.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006

>>post partum depression is so serious, they actually recommend you don't have another child. <<

OMG! Seriously?! There are "experts" who say that people who experience depression shouldn't reproduce? That's appalling!

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006

>>I only read parts of "What to Expect..." And I still knew of this expression. Heck, even I can't go days without eating ~ I knew my baby could not suddenly go days without eating when she'd been "eating" for months. I couldn't take that away. So nurses or not, I knew I had to give the baby formula and stop when breastfeeding began.<<

Well, that's what you get when you take books like "What To Expect" seriously. Bad breastfeeding advice. There is no need for an average mom to give formula while waiting days for the milk to come in.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006

>>But no, I don't believe it is common sense necessarily.<<

ITA, but it is a rare bird who is willing to admit it online. Kudos!

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