Does C-Secion rate have a corellation with successful breastfeeding?

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2010
Does C-Secion rate have a corellation with successful breastfeeding?
9
Tue, 02-22-2011 - 2:48pm

Here is why I ask, So 4 months ago I delivered an amazing little girl via c-section. I had a horrible labor, followed by an emergancy c-section where I had an alergic reaction to some of the drugs they used. For 3 days I was incoherant, extremely dehydrated and had horrible eclampsia with risk of seizures. Because of all of these issues and medications I had to be on I was told it was not in my or my baby's best interest to breast feed.

If I had not been pushed into a c-section or had issues I would have wanted to at least try. I am wondering if surgery combined with issues not only makes mom's more hesitant to breastfeed but also makes medical professionals push twords formula as an easy solution rather than breastfeeding during a dificult situation.

Does the increase in c-sections also correlate with moms using formula versus breastfeeding?

Kristy

Lilypie Second Birthday tickers
Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010

Community Leader
Registered: 06-10-2008
Kristy, yes, having a c-section can absolutely make breastfeeding more of a challenge, without a doubt. I'm so sorry you had such a rough birth and postpartum experience. Just a question, did you work at all in the hospital with a lactation consultant to get her take on whether those specifics meds were contraindicated for breastfeeding and whether nursing would be an option for you? Also, were you on those meds for days or for a prolonged period of time? If it was a shorter period of time, did you ever consider starting nursing after your time on the meds was done? I'm just throwing out a few questions because I wonder if perhaps your dr's weren't terribly supportive of breastfeeding to begin with.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-20-2011

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010

welcome

Welcome to the debate board. It's wonderful to see you posting here and I hope that you will stick around and post more often.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2010

The meds that prevented me from breastfeeding were not from surgery, sorry should have clarified that. I am on Zoloft (which in a small enough dose is safe for breastfeeding) . I took the smallest possible dose during pregnancy but after I delivered I got horrible post pardon depression in which my dosage had be increased substancially. My Dr felt that my mental health was more important in my ability to care for my daughter than breastfeeding and after experiencing extreme ppd I agreed.

If I had not had that issue though I still think I would have been behind the 8 ball so to speak because they really didn't encourage breastfeeding they just said I needed rest and for my healty and the babies they were going to give her a bottle. Me being pretty much incoherant at the time let them do it.

I think this happens a lot with c-sections. I have a friend who desperately wanted to breastfeed but got no assistance at the hospital and I lthink that was one of the main reasons she didn't. She has never really forgiven herself. Now she is pregnant again and I think will be more forceful about it. It seems to me that a lot of hospitals are more for their convenience than what is best for mom and baby.

Kristy

Lilypie Second Birthday tickers
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-17-2007

I too had a c-section with my daughter and I too dealt with pre-e. It was a very rough go, I'll totally agree with you. I didn't get a lot of great support for bf in the hospital. I even had a couple nurses look at me funny and say, "You're bf? After all you've been through?" But at that point it was the thing I latched onto as the one thing I could do for my daughter, since I was pretty well confined to the bed most of the time and too exhausted from the mag to do much less. My mature milk came in later than average because of the surgery, on day five. Until then I was pushed more or less relentlessly to supplement with formula. I think the reason I succeeded was that I became incredibly hard-headed about it, and didn't have long-term issues (medical contraindications) to stop me. To what would have been my tremendous surprise at the time, she's 33 months old now and is still nursing. I'm 33w pg with #2, and facing the possibility of pre-e again. And I'll be bf, come h3ll or high water.




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Thanks

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2006

Absolutely I think that the increase in c-section rates has a hand in the low Bf'ing success rates.

2010 Siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-04-2005

I don't think the lack of support for bf in hospitals is limited to those who have had c-sections.

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Community Leader
Registered: 06-10-2008
Wow, they told you to not breastfeed for ZOLOFT?? This definitely sounds like a case of a doctor not being supportive of breastfeeding at all. Zoloft is the safest possible antidepressant for breastfeeding. Even at higher doses, research shows that passage of Zoloft into mom's milk is undetectable to minimal. I would agree that your mental health was of primary importance here but since Zoloft is fine while nursing, I really think you got some bad information.

This really doesn't sound like a c-section issue, this sounds like an unsupportive hospital issue. My prior question stands: where on earth was the hospital LC in all of this? Did anyone ask her about the Zoloft because I'm guessing she would have given the correct info. I understand you were really really sick after delivery. However, after you were better and able to function, did anyone ever suggest trying to get the baby back to the breast? I'm guessing no. I'm sorry the health professionals you counted on to give you complete information didn't do that.
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