Does the lower cancer risk matter to you?

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Does the lower cancer risk matter to you?
1
Mon, 01-14-2013 - 12:24pm

Does the lower risk of cancer affect your choice to breastfeed - or not? Or for how long to breastfeed?

1. Reduces the risk of breast cancer. Women who breastfeed reduce their risk of developing breast cancer by as much as 25 percent. The reduction in cancer risk comes in proportion to the cumulative lifetime duration of breastfeeding. That is, the more months or years a mother breastfeeds, the lower her risk of breast cancer.

2. Reduces the risk of uterine and ovarian cancer. One of the reasons for the cancer-fighting effects of breastfeeding is that estrogen levels are lower during lactation. It is thought that the less estrogen available to stimulate the lining of the uterus and perhaps breast tissue also, the less the risk of these tissues becoming cancerous.

Read more: http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/breastfeeding/why-breast-best/7-ways-breastfeeding-benefits-mothers

Breastfeeding Reduces Risk Of Breast Cancer For Women Who Delay Childbirth

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070416193310.htm

Ovarian cancer risk is reduced by prolonged lactation: a case-control study in southern China:
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2013/01/02/ajcn.112.044719.short?rss=1

Breastfeeding Helps Prevent Breast Cancer, Lowers Your Risk:
http://breastcancer.about.com/od/riskfactorsindetail/a/breastfd_prevnt.htm

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Thu, 01-17-2013 - 12:08pm

Science You Can Use: Breastfeeding may reduce ovarian cancer risk by up to 91%, finds new study.

Specifically, they found:

Women who breastfed for more than 13 months were 63 percent less likely to develop an ovarian tumor than women who breastfed for less than seven months. The benefits jumped the longer that women breastfed. The researchers found that mothers who had three children and who breastfed for over 31 months were up to 91 percent less likely to suffer from ovarian cancer than women who breastfed for under 10 months.

Note that the comparisons here were between mothers who breastfed for different durations, not between women who did and did not breastfeed.  This is also impressive because the median age for diagnosis of ovarian cancer in the U.S. is 63 – many years after the childbearing period in women’s lives.  The average age of participants in this study was 59.

Why would this be?  One theory about the development of ovarian cancer is that the more ovulations a woman has, the higher the risk of cancer.  Of course, pregnancy and breastfeeding suppress ovulation (not necessarily for the full duration of breastfeeding).

Read more: http://www.bestforbabes.org/science-you-can-use-breastfeeding-reduces-ovarian-cancer-risk-by-up-to-91-says-new-study