Does what you eat affect your breastfeeding baby?

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Does what you eat affect your breastfeeding baby?
13
Sun, 03-31-2013 - 8:41am

Food and Beverages Not Likely to Make Breast-Fed Babies Fussy

Feb. 13, 2013 — Many new moms fear that eating the wrong foods while breast-feeding will make their baby fussy. However, no sound scientific evidence exists to support claims that certain foods or beverages lead to fussiness in infants, according to Gina Neill, a Loyola University Health System registered dietitian.

Read more: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130213114511.htm

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Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010

OK, I am finally seeing where you are going with this - sorry, it's been a difficult few days for me, and I am not feeling too bright... LOL

Yes, I was more sensitive to my children's needs. Which does not change the fact that they were sensitive themselves, just that I was paying attention and trying to do something about it.

So back to the original question - Does what you eat affect your breastfeeding baby?

Obviously I do think that what -I- ate affected -MY- babies. I wouldn't say that translates to all babies - I do think it's possible, but I don't think it's absolute.

But I am still not clear where you stand on this question?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002

witch_power wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">thardy2001</em> wrote:</div>A difference in how a child responds.  If a child gets both bm and formula, it means fewer feedings with the good in bm and the bad; and the less sensitive the child will be to bad things like caffeine, alcohol, etc in the mother's bm.</blockquote></p><p>OK, but my 2nd and third only got breastmilk - the 2nd exclusively (no solids) for 9.5 months and the 3rd exclusively (no solids) for 18 months. So there is my confusion? There was no caffeine or alcohol in my milk. There were no meds in my milk. And I did my level best to make sure there were little allergens in my milk.</p><p>Because my boys were sensitive - all of them, to some extent - right from birth (probably before that).</p>

So you were very sensitive to the needs of your children.  And not having caffeine or alcohol, you also were sensitive to their needs and you wouldn't see your babies reacting to caffeine or alcohol in your bm.

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010

thardy2001 wrote:
A difference in how a child responds.  If a child gets both bm and formula, it means fewer feedings with the good in bm and the bad; and the less sensitive the child will be to bad things like caffeine, alcohol, etc in the mother's bm.

OK, but my 2nd and third only got breastmilk - the 2nd exclusively (no solids) for 9.5 months and the 3rd exclusively (no solids) for 18 months. So there is my confusion? There was no caffeine or alcohol in my milk. There were no meds in my milk. And I did my level best to make sure there were little allergens in my milk.

Because my boys were sensitive - all of them, to some extent - right from birth (probably before that).

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002

witch_power wrote:
<p>OK, I was confused because it appeared to me that you were responding to my experience of a sensitive child, since you included my quote in your post - not that you were replying to the original post.</p><p>I asked the original question to start a debate - and I didn't think I was saying you were wrong with your answer. How could we debate if you onlyagreed with me?? LOL</p><p>I thought I was asking for clarification because I wasn't clear where you were going with your comment, in regards to my own experience?</p><p>Sorry, I can get lost easy some days! LOL</p><p><em><strong>&lt;&lt;I thought you didn't exclusively bf for all of your children?  That may have made the difference.&gt;&gt;</strong></em></p><p>I made a stupid choice with my first, and have always regretted it, because he suffered greatly as a result. With my next two children, they were exclusively breastfed and for me, for my children, there was no such thing as a formula choice. I feel fortunate that I was able to stick with that choice, without compromise - because I know that it isn't always possible.</p><p>But I am not sure what you mean by that "may have made the difference"?</p><p>A difference in my opinion... or in my children's reactions?</p>

A difference in how a child responds.  If a child gets both bm and formula, it means fewer feedings with the good in bm and the bad; and the less sensitive the child will be to bad things like caffeine, alcohol, etc in the mother's bm.

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010

OK, I was confused because it appeared to me that you were responding to my experience of a sensitive child, since you included my quote in your post - not that you were replying to the original post.

I asked the original question to start a debate - and I didn't think I was saying you were wrong with your answer. How could we debate if you onlyagreed with me?? LOL

I thought I was asking for clarification because I wasn't clear where you were going with your comment, in regards to my own experience?

Sorry, I can get lost easy some days! LOL

<<I thought you didn't exclusively bf for all of your children?  That may have made the difference.>>

I made a stupid choice with my first, and have always regretted it, because he suffered greatly as a result. With my next two children, they were exclusively breastfed and for me, for my children, there was no such thing as a formula choice. I feel fortunate that I was able to stick with that choice, without compromise - because I know that it isn't always possible.

But I am not sure what you mean by that "may have made the difference"?

A difference in my opinion... or in my children's reactions?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002

witch_power wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">thardy2001</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;I think sensitivity belongs to the mother. We either buy the whole story that bm is best because it is &lt;em&gt;mother's&lt;/em&gt; milk.  Or we don't.  &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>I am not quite sure what you are saying here? But it sounds pretty black and white, and I live in a grey world...</p><p>For myself, I do believe that mother's milk is best, and especially so because my son was sensitive. I nearly lost my first sensitive child because I chose formula for him.</p>

Then why ask your original question?  You wanted a black and white answer.  Or did you want me just to agree with you?  Either we accept that breast is best because what we consume makes up bm.  Or we make excuses for drinking alcohol during breastfeeding and pregnancy.  Or McDonalds, coffee, or worse.  I was intune and sensitive to my children when they breastfed and could tell I should not even drink caffeine ~ as infants, they responded.  Therefore, they would be affected - negatively and positively - by what I drank/ate.  I signed up and was all in.

I thought you didn't exclusively bf for all of your children?  That may have made the difference.

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010

Greeneyes2013 wrote:
<p>in moderation I think most foods are OK, generally speaking</p>

I agree!

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010

thardy2001 wrote:
<p>I think sensitivity belongs to the mother. We either buy the whole story that bm is best because it is <em>mother's</em> milk.  Or we don't.  </p>

I am not quite sure what you are saying here? But it sounds pretty black and white, and I live in a grey world...

For myself, I do believe that mother's milk is best, and especially so because my son was sensitive. I nearly lost my first sensitive child because I chose formula for him.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002

witch_power wrote:
<p>Welcome to the board Greeneyes!!</p><p><em><strong>&lt;&lt; I think sensitivity depends on the baby (genetic), and the amount consumed.&gt;&gt;</strong></em></p><p>I agree. My youngest was a sensitive child - he seemed to react to everything I ate. I had to eat a very strict diet to keep him feeling well. But I think that it's fairly rare. The child before him was not as sensitive, and there were only a few foods I avoided while breastfeeding him.</p>

I think sensitivity belongs to the mother.  Smile  We either buy the whole story that bm is best because it is mother's milk.  Or we don't. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013

Thanks! I used to post here, a long long long time ago.

I imagine if I drank a pot of coffee a day, it would affect the quality of my milk, but in moderation I think most foods are OK, generally speaking

Shaking my head at the things grown women get their panties in a wad about.

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