Exclusively Pumping vs. Formula

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-22-2008
Exclusively Pumping vs. Formula
78
Thu, 11-04-2010 - 9:23pm

Hi Ladies,

I'm not a regular on this board but I saw mention of it in the Explore iVillage folder of my EC.

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Community Leader
Registered: 06-10-2008
Thu, 11-04-2010 - 9:27pm

Have you ever considered doing some of each? If pumping while you're out on a particular day is too much, feed formula for that feeding and pump while you're home. Just a thought....

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-17-2007
Thu, 11-04-2010 - 10:19pm

You may find pumping isn't as awful as you think it will be. But as the pp brought up, I'd keep a few things in mind:

1. You can do both: it's not just one or the other.

2. Newborns eat every 2-3 hours, but some do more often than that. A three-month-old infant may eat less often, will probably eat a little less often. An older infant may eat significantly less often.

3. You may not need to pump for every feed. EBF babies consume between 20-30 ounces daily from one month until 8-10 months, when they usually consume less. Many women don't respond well to a pump, but many women do. Your baby will not really need to consume more than 2 ounces in the beginning, although you may be able to pump much more than that. For example, I nursed my daughter ten times a day and pumped three times a day until I went back to school with her (then she went into daycare). I could nurse her all she wanted and still pump 12 oz a day, only pumping one side, three times. I knew women who ep'd and by three or four months, they only needed to pump three times a day to get the whole amount for the day.

Only you have the ability to decide what's going to be right for you, how much time dedicated is too much, whether your pumping output justifies the time you put in, etc. But if it were me facing the necessity of exclusive pumping, I'd commit to trying it for at least two months. After all, you can always decide that pumping isn't working out for you and be done with it. It is not so easy to decide you'd rather pump and give breastmilk when you've been giving all formula for months.




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Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Fri, 11-05-2010 - 12:08am

welcome

Welcome to the debate board. It's wonderful to see you posting here and I hope that you will stick around and post more often.

I have known a few moms over the years who have had children with cleft palate and I think it's wonderful that you are considering BFing! Whenever I felt like giving up BFing with my 2nd child, I would think of the mom I met who had exclusively pumped for her little one till he was 11 months old and had the surgery and he was finally able to nurse at the breast. I admired her so much - it was a huge feat to accomplish back when my boys were babies and most people didn't BF at all! I figured if she could work that hard for her baby, I could BF mine!

Since then I have met several moms who were able to BF despite the cleft palate - I didn't even know that was possible way back when. But they have learned so much, and have ways to make it easier to attain the suction. If it was me, I would be researching the topic to death and talking to some moms who were able to successfully BF or exclusively pumped.

The first place I would start would be Kellymom - http://www.kellymom.com/babyconcerns/bfhelp-cleft.html

From the sounds of it, no matter what you chose, you will be spending a lot of quality time with your new baby and he or she will need you so much more than some babies might. Revel in it, think of this as a wonderful time to enjoy your baby and how special he or she is. You might be surprised at how protective you may feel after birth and all those things that you thought were so important, just fall by the wayside as you gaze at your beautiful baby! Or not... :)

I hope that you will keep us updated with how it goes!

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-22-2009
Fri, 11-05-2010 - 10:49am

Congrats on your pregnancy.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2010
Fri, 11-05-2010 - 1:19pm

I feel for you, starting your babymoon with a problem right off the bat. But keep a couple things in mind:

1--baby won't be a newborn long, and this phase goes by so, so, so fast (said as I'm coming out of the sugar coma induced by my 7 year old's birthday cake yesterday...). The time spent pumping and feeding will grow shorter and shorter.

2--as a pp said, it may not be as hard as it seems. The links that jimomma provided are great ones.

Kevali


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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2006
Fri, 11-05-2010 - 2:29pm

You've gotten a lot of good advice so far.

2010 Siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2010
Fri, 11-05-2010 - 3:28pm
<<3. I know I'll have to deal with a lot of flack for choosing formula out of convenience instead of being willing to be a slave to a breast pump for the sake of my baby.

Who exactly do you envision receiving this flack from? Do you have unsupportive friends, family, co-workers, etc that you believe will give you a hard time? Because the #1 important thing for you to have, no matter what decision you make, is supportive people close to you. Hopefully at least your DH is supportive no matter what decision you make because that is going to be important to help you feel good about your decision.>>

Further to that, Jess, my advice would also be --in the event you decide you're done pumping and it's time to use formula-- to let your friends know you've made up your mind and you would appreciate any support they can give but that you'd rather not hear any negativity about it. That might put the kibosh on any flack you might get. And ITA with Traci that your DH is the one whose support you need most, whether he's physically there or not! :-)

Kevali


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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Fri, 11-05-2010 - 3:31pm

Just so you know where I'm coming from, I have worked and pumped (twice a day) for 9 months when my oldest was born, and EP'd when my twins were in the NICU (pumped for 10 weeks total), and I've bf'd and ff'd.

EP'ing can be hard and time consuming, but breastmilk has countless benefits to the immune system and it has health benefits for your body as well (lower rates of breast and ovarian cancers).

"The key to good decision making is not knowledge. It is understanding."
Malcolm Gladwell Blink

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2010
Fri, 11-05-2010 - 4:18pm

By the way...

bradsarmybride wrote:

Hi Ladies,

I'm not a regular on this board ...

Kevali


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