Fodder?

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Fodder?
2
Sat, 08-25-2012 - 9:19pm

There seems to be widespread misunderstanding of science experiments and what they can tell us. Everyone should be aware of the uncertainty in experiments and the lack of generalizability to every single person or situation.

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/moral-landscapes/201201/parents-should-know-the-limitations-science-experiments

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008
In reply to: nisupulla
Tue, 08-28-2012 - 12:42pm
This article does a good job of explaining why the limitations in the way BF studies are conducted does not make the results worthless. Many of the recent crop of critics of the BF science (many of whom a not even scientists or medical experts) often like to point out the limitations in the way BF studies are done and then use that to argue that that means we can't prove BF'ing is significantly better and so we should stop pushing moms to BF. The reality is though that they have never proven formula is close enough to BF'ing but want us to just assume that unless proven otherwise. This article rightly points out that the precautionary principle dictates that we are better off in general going with the notion that BF'ing is in deed significantly less risky then formula, even if we can't apply the gold standard to it due to medical ethics. What some people expect in terms of evidence before they accept that formula is indeed significantly risky, even in the developed countries, would require we throw out medical ethics to conduct BF studies using the gold standard and I'd hope no of them really believe we should go that route. As such, they need to learn to live with a lesser standard in this case. We do so all the time in other areas related to the study of human beings but with this issue so many moms want to be able to FF guilt-free that they want to set the bar higher then we expect on other human health issues. We also have formula industry that I think likely helps push this FUD about BF science behind the scenes to keep formula sales up.

Photobucket

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
In reply to: nisupulla
Tue, 08-28-2012 - 4:25pm

What some people expect in terms of evidence before they accept that formula is indeed significantly risky, even in the developed countries, would require we throw out medical ethics to conduct BF studies using the gold standard and I'd hope no of them really believe we should go that route.

I agree. I think we see that argument often, ie, since the studies cannot be black and white, they are of little value. What's the dismissive mantra, "not causal", "confounding factors", etc?