Good idea - or just a way to sell more formula?

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Good idea - or just a way to sell more formula?
13
Tue, 06-04-2013 - 10:55am

In the article “The Utility of Breast Milk for Genetic or Genomic Studies: A Systematic Review,” the authors describe the potential value of the genetic information obtained from breast milk, which can be collected easily and noninvasively. It could lead to a better understanding of the variability in breast milk and to strategies for optimizing the neonatal diet through fortification of donor breast milk, supplementation of the mother’s diet, or maternal lifestyle changes that would affect breast milk composition.

“The great majority of mothers produces milk that matches the needs of her infant amazingly well,” says Associate Editor David S. Newburg, PhD, Professor, Department of Biology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA. “But for those few infants with exceptional needs, such as premature infants, or for mothers with uncommon mutations whose milk lacks the full complement of beneficial components, genetic and genomic analysis would both identify the mismatch and provide the information to produce a personalized complementary fortifier or supplement.

Read more: http://bfmed.wordpress.com/2013/06/04/can-genetic-analysis-of-breast-milk-help-identify-ways-to-improve-a-newborns-diet/

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2010
Thu, 06-06-2013 - 10:55am

I don't think it's ever a bad idea to study the composition of breastmilk. If only to give us more to debate, lol!

But the part you highlighted followed a "BUT," and that BUT may be what makes the difference between a woman who thinks she needs to go straight to formula and a woman who knows what the issues are and breastfeeds anyway, supplementing with something helpful (hopefully) instead of not breastfeeding at all.

Kevali


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Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Thu, 06-06-2013 - 12:10pm

I can see it being very useful info - when I think of what my milk may have been missing to cause my boys to be so allergic - I can definitely see the benefits of this.

But I can also see the formula companies getting their hands on testing like this, to show women that their milk is inadequate and without their formula, or at least their breast milk supplements - you are not doing the very best for your baby....

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Fri, 06-07-2013 - 9:42am

witch_power wrote:
<p>I can see it being very useful info - when I think of what my milk may have been missing to cause my boys to be so allergic - I can definitely see the benefits of this.</p><p>But I can also see the formula companies getting their hands on testing like this, to show women that their milk is inadequate and without their formula, or at least their breast milk supplements - you are not doing the very best for your baby....</p>

The article/the study don't say that at all.  In fact, these researchers are encouraging breastfeeding.  Not hoping to help formula companies.  The researchers admit breastmilk should be the main source of nutrition, but a small number of new moms may need to supplement with formula.  Only 2 groups are discussed ~ moms of premature babies in the NICU.  That NICU stay is limited, isn't it?  Mom can pump/breastfeed during the NICU stay, and then breastfeed exclusively when the baby comes home.  These researchers are looking into that defined NICU stay ~ should breastmilk be supplemented then.  Not after the NICU stay.

The only other time breastmilk may need to be supplemented they say, is for moms lacking something in their breastmilk.  Again, a small minority, as yet not defined. 

That doesn't pit pro-formula against breastfeeding.

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Fri, 06-07-2013 - 10:48am

Yes, I do understand that this was not the focus of the researchers.

I guess I am just seeing a future where something that was created to help a small number of babies becomes a requirement for almost all babies - and the marketers who ran with it make mothers feel inadequate about their breastmilk...

Nah... that could never happen... Wink

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2010
Fri, 06-07-2013 - 4:05pm

They wouldn't be doing their jobs if they didn't jump on every opportunity to sell more of their product. Hopefully the key will be educating the medical professionals about exactly what constitues a necessity, and not just babble off  "...but formula is just fine, in fact I just received samples of the New And Improved Simihock for Mothers Like You Who Are Deficient!"

(/TIC)

Kevali


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Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010

kevali2010 wrote:
the key will be educating the medical professionals about exactly what constitues a necessity, and not just babble off  "...but formula is just fine, in fact I just received samples of the New And Improved Simihock for Mothers Like You Who Are Deficient!"

How has that worked so far? Wink

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Sat, 06-08-2013 - 8:57am

witch_power wrote:
  How has that worked so far? <img src="/forums/sites/all/libraries/tinymce/jscripts/tiny_mce/plugins/emotions/img/smiley-wink.gif" alt="Wink" title="Wink" border="0" /></p>

I thought you said you used formula and breastfed.  Did you feel pressured by formula researchers/manufacturers to go that route?  I don't think formula mfrs could force many women to ff when they want to bf.  Do you think most women really want to breastfeed but don't? 

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010

Yes, I used both breastfeeding and formula till my first child's was 3 weeks old, and then formula (and solids) till he was 6 months old. The next two were breastfed exclusively until they started on solids.

It was a different time back then (1970's), but yes, I did feel pressured. I was given poor advice in hospital and by my doctor, that lead me to give up too early and think that my baby would not survive without formula after every breastfeeding - and at that, I was only allowed to nurse him for 10 minutes every 4 hours - before giving him a 4 ounce bottle of formula - AND a 2 ounce bottle of sugar water inbetween feedings. Sadly, I simply did what I was told with my first - I didn't know any better.

Back then, yes, most women preferred to use formula - I was the outlander when I breastfed my next two... Nowadays, I do think more women plan to breastfeed, and yet still... after all this time, are sabatoged with poor advice and inadequate support.

No, formula manufacturers cannot FORCE women to use formula when they want to breastfeed. But they can help to create the atmosphere that makes women feel inadequate about their breastmilk. It is a part of their marketing stategy.

As Gerber says... Babies are our business...

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 06-08-2013 - 10:53pm

 >>I don't think formula mfrs could force many women to ff when they want to bf.  <<

Really? REALLY?!

I firmly believe that the formula industry convinces many women to use formula, even when they think that breastfeeding is a good idea.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2010
Tue, 06-11-2013 - 9:01am

 ">>I don't think formula mfrs could force many women to ff when they want to bf.  <<

Really? REALLY?!

I firmly believe that the formula industry convinces many women to use formula, even when they think that breastfeeding is a good idea."

?  "Force" and "convince" are different things.

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