Help! having a baby in a week!

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2003
Help! having a baby in a week!
12
Sat, 09-06-2003 - 11:11pm
Hello-

I am having a c-section next monday (the 15th!) and am experiencing the first time mom jitters. Everyday I get calls from people that tell me how terrible life with a newborn is for the first few months, and how my life will never be the same, etcetcetc. Basically I think these are the types of people that love to complain about things because after they go on and on about how dreadful life with a fussy newborn is I'll ask them if they would rather trade their babies in to have their old lives back and they all say no!

trust me- I'm not an idiot- I have worked with babies all of my life, I know they are very needy and how demanding it is to have a new baby in the house.

Anyway, lately I have been hearing the horror stories about BF. I have been looking forward to BF since the minute I got pg. I read books and have been trying to prepare myself for the changes BF will have on my body and my life, but I am also trying to keep an open mind to things.

So everybook I have says that if BF is done right, you shouldn't have sore nipples. my friends laugh at that. The books say no pacifier for at least 6 weeks, my friends laugh at that too. "there is no such thing as nipple confusion" they say. Of course my plan isn't to supplement with formula, but then my friends tell me that they have all done that when their baby was starving, or when their milk hasn't come in yet, or when they were just too drained or sore to BF. Also the diet- its SO strict! So again, my friends are telling me that they ate chocolate ice cream and had an occasional soda with no adverse effects on BF. Here is another thing- I am having a c-section and the books say not to take narcotics for pain relief because they pass into breastmilk. Two of my friends had C-sections and took percocet without any adverse effect on BF.

I am just so frustrated because the things I have read are all 100% BF all the way.. no formula, no pacifiers, no caffiene, chocolate, etcetc. But I would really love some advice that is a little more laid back. My goal is to have BM be my baby's primary form of nutrition, and to be able to do it successfully. If reading that pacifiers will hurt my success with BF then I don't want to give my baby one. On the same note if supplementing with formula or eating certain foods are bad for BF success I won't want to do that either. But will my baby REALLY suffer if I stick a pacifier in his mouth when he's inconsolable?

I am getting so much contradictory information that I am starting to get annoyed that I wasted all of my time believing what I read about breastfeeding, because the info seems to be almost too strict and a little judgemental.

Can some of you help me out here???? One of my friends told me that books like that are very strict but are done that way on purpose hoping that you'll take MOST, not all, but most of the information in the book and be still be successful at BF.

What do you all think? Can you offer me your advice? What worked for you? What didn't?

I am open to any info you all may have here....

But hurry- I only have a week left! (haha)

Thanks!!!

~Stacie

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Avatar for yogamom4
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-01-2003
Sun, 09-07-2003 - 1:11am
i have had 2 csecs and 2 vbacs

i also had dilauded around the clock the first 24 hs and then 2 percocets every 3-4 hrs after the csec, i do believe if it was harm ful to the baby the hospitals would not give the medication

with my first child i bf for over two yrs and i gave up coffee,, wouldn't take any medication for my migraines, made sure the food i ate didn't affect the baby

and now 4 children and a total of 7 breastfeeding yrs later i eat what ever i want and don't stress about things like that anymore

as for nipple confusion,,its true don't give them a binky for awhile ~~ why would you want to start that anyways??? my girlfriend is constantly looking for lost binkys and probly has spent hundreds of dollars on those dumb things,, none of my kids used them,, and you won't want to supplement w/ formula unless you don't want to breastfeed for long,,

the pain is worse the first few days after your milk comes in but then it goes away and you shouldn't have any problems unless baby doesn't latch on correctly

you might want to pick up a little tube of lansinoh just incase your nipples do get bothered soem hospitals provide samples or even ask a nurse for some vitamin a&d cream i think thats the name of it

another thing is try to not be stressed out baby can sense that i don't unde4rstand how some people have such problems breastfeeding its babys natural instict to turn to the breast and suck, ever wonder why your nipples get darker??so baby can see them!! :-)

yoga

Vicky ~32~

SAHM  To

Kelsey The Brainiac

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-2003
Sun, 09-07-2003 - 4:14am
Hi! I've been MIA for a while, but I'm here tonight and came across your message. I hope that I can help you out a bit.

I have 4 children, all of which I attempted to BF and have done so successfully with 3 of them for a minimum of 3 months. My 2nd child I BF for about 2 years. I am still nursing my 5 month old son.

I'm gonna get a lot of harassment from the people here for saying this, but I don't change my diet at ALL! Caffiene is supposed to keep baby up, but even my dr.s agree that since I had it through pregnancy, it won't affect baby much through BFing. I'm a Diet Coke fiend and I won't give it up. I know it's not hurting my baby because he sleeps like any normal child would. I eat at least 3 bowls of ice cream a week, I snack on whatever strikes my fancy. I had medication concerns which were addressed on this board, but determined through the help of these wonderful women that I would be okay to take them. You do, however, have to take things into account... do you drink a lot of caffiene now? If so, the same amount, IMO, won't hurt baby while BFing. Do you eat what you want now? Same thing. However, if something makes you gassy, it's going to make baby gassy. Broccoli is a big one for my son, I've noticed. Gas is the biggest problem with making a baby fussy, IMO.

Pacifiers... I've used them, but my kids aren't really interested in them very much. I keep one in the car because we travel through a lot of desert and my son is a bit "spoiled" so he gets angry that I can't hold him in the car. I toss a binky in his mouth and he's fine, but at home, he won't have it. They're not a necessity, however, so if you don't want to use them, don't. There is such a thing as nipple confusion... but I have not experienced it with 3 of my 4 kids. The main reason we did with my 4th is because she was premature and couldn't latch on me correctly. I pumped and bottle fed her and eventually gave up... that's a whole different story, but we did try with the LC and LLL members it just didn't work. She was tiny!!

My son, who is the one still BFing, was born by C-section. Already having 3 kids ahead of him, I will have nothing but horror stories for you on the pain. My 3 yr old actually JUMPED on my tummy while I was asleep and I have never, and hope I will never feel such a pain in my life!!!!!!!!!! I did not take Percocet... it makes me vomit and I can't imagine having to throw up while having that cut. I opted for Tylenol 3 with codene instead. It worked just as well and is harmless to your newborn. I believe that Percs are fine too, otherwise I'm sure they wouldn't offer it in the hospital. At any rate, my best friend also had a c-section with her baby (she only has the one), and said that yes, there was pain, but nothing like what I was describing. She also had the luxury of being able to stay in bed most of the time. Being a mom of 3 with a hubby in the military, I could not do that. I guess I'm a little bitter about the whole situation... you'd think he could stay home with me at least PART of every day to help out until I healed, but that didn't happen. I will make one suggestion for pain management. Sleep in a recliner chair if you have one. It's the easiest thing to get out of if you can put the foot rest down with your arm. Most of my pain happened while getting out of bed or off the couch while healing... it was easier to sleep on the couch than the bed but MUCH easier to get out of the chair than either. Hope that helps... if you have any other questions, please feel free to e-mail me at tiredofevry1@msn.com. I can't promise how often I will be around the board because we are in the process of moving away.

Krissy

P.S. Once you heal from your surgery, you are VERY numb all around the incision. I still am after all this time. My best friend still is after a year and my SIL is still after 10 months. It's highly annoying!!! I would have done anything to avoid that surgery, but my son was breech and they assured me, along with friends and family members that my son would be better off with the section. He is healthy and happy today, so I don't regret it for a minute!!!

Avatar for kfira71
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sun, 09-07-2003 - 1:04pm
Actually, it sounds as though you have a great attitude about what to expect with a new baby. It's amazing how many mothers love to give all kinds of "advice" to an expectant first-time mom, without realizing how awful they make some things sound, isn't it? Like you, I did a ton of reading while I was pg (though unlike you, I had zero firsthand experience with babies), so I had lots of information, good and bad, from all kinds of sources by the time my DS arrived.

Since I'm not a success story when it comes to BFing, I don't really feel qualified to give you guidance on a lot of the issues you bring up (so, basically, take what follows FWIW, which is just my experience and my opinions about it). The only thing I can tell you for certain is that every baby is different, and every mother is different, so don't take what any one person tells you as absolute truth in terms of what you'll experience. I had major problems getting DS to latch on (turns out I have flat nipples, something I didn't realize, since they do stick out a little, and definitely aren't "inverted," as I had read about), so I wound up pumping for three weeks. I actually loved doing that (I had a Medela Pump in Style, which was great), but did wind up with a horrible case of mastitis that had me in the hospital on IV for 4 days. After that, I switched completely to formula.

I'm sure I made many mistakes, and I definitely didn't do what "the books" say to. First, my DS got supplementing bottles from the get go. I, too, had a C-section, and definitely felt too tired to have DS brought to me for nighttime feedings every two hours during those first couple of nights. When the nurses asked if I wanted them to handle the nighttime feedings, I gratefully took them up on it. As I said, DS wasn't latching at all, despite the help of every nurse/LC on the floor. He gulped his bottles down like nobody's business, though, and seemed extremely content with that. I also gave him a paci from the beginning. He had a very strong need to suck, and the paci was a huge help in that regard (we weaned him from it at about 4.5 months).

I had read, like you, that pacis and bottles are an absolute no-no, at least for the first few months, until BFing is well established. But, I had also spoken to a mom (my cousin) who successfully BF two of her kids, and she told me that they used a paci from the beginning and had no problems at all. The thing of it is, I knew myself, and I knew what my attitude was going into it: I was going to try to BF, but I was fine with it if it didn't work out. I was not going to make myself crazy or hysterical over it, because I had seen so many relatives and friends who went through hell for weeks, only to give up after 6, 7, or 8 weeks along and switch to formula. To me, it seemed as though they had lost those first precious weeks to misery, as both the mothers and the babies were wrecks the whole time. I didn't want that for myself or my baby, and I believe formula is a perfectly acceptable alternative.

That, in all likelihood, was the biggest factor in my switching to formula. If I had had the "I'm going to make BFing work no matter what" stance that some women have, I would imagine things would have turned out differently. But I didn't (and still don't) feel that way, so there you have it. To be honest, I think the biggest problem was the flat nipples. Basically, DS just screamed and screamed whenever we tried putting him to the breast (and we tried *a lot*, and DS was actually a very laid back kid overall. He was just hungry!). I've learned from this board that it might help to use a manual or electric pump for a minute or two to draw the nipple out first, then try latching. I'll give that a try with my next, should I have another. As for pacis and supplementing, I'm sure the odds are better that BFing will go more smoothly if you avoid them, at least in the beginning.

I think you just have to know yourself, stay calm, and know that you *will* be a good mother, no matter what, because you'll give your precious baby all of the love you possibly can. Everything else is secondary, as far as I'm concerned. It's possible that your baby will latch on beautifully from the beginning, will be able to switch from paci or bottle to breast without a blink, and will be totally unaffected by a diet that includes caffeine. I've seen all of that happen with that cousin of mine. And I've seen women who completely avoided all of the stuff they were "supposed to," and still had a terrible time of it and quit. I'm sure pretty much every scenario exists somewhere, and, as you've learned, everyone loves to share their opinions, LOL!

I guess my only advice would be to do as much as you feel you can toward making BFing work for you. I know that I would not have been able to do without the paci for my DS, or without the help of others being able to give him bottles so I could rest for longer than two hours at a time during those newborn months (I did not want to co-sleep, so nursing while sleeping was not an option I was willing to entertain). I know that I was a better mother to my DS because I was not lightheaded and woozy from lack of sleep, which I was feeling when I went too many days without at least 4 consecutive hours of sleep. But again, I think it's all about the individual and their attitude. You may find that you can do without pacis and supplementing just fine (or at least, enough so that you can manage, because it's important enough to you), and that the dietary "restrictions," if any, are worth it. You may also find that you manage quite nicely on a couple of hours of sleep at a time, and that it doesn't have the adverse effects that I felt it did on me. We're all different, and we all make decisions based on our own feelings about what is best *for us*.

Incidentally, just wanted to add that I actually had a great experience with my C-section overall. It was not scheduled (DS was very large -- 9 lbs. 6 oz. -- and my pelvis couldn't accomodate him), but it was completely painless, I was awake to see my little man the moment he entered the world, and my recovery was actually quite easy (I think I took one prescription Motrin the whole time). Again, I heard horror stories about C-sections, and I don't have a vaginal birth experience to compare it to, but just thought I'd share my experience with it, to add to what I'm sure is a lot of information that you already have.

Anyway, I've rambled enough. I'm sure the long-term BFers around here can use my story to illustrate all kinds of no-nos and offer helpful advice, LOL! Congratulations on your little one, and best of luck to you with everything!

~Kim

"Becoming a parent means agreeing to allow your heart to go walking around outside of your body."

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2003
Sun, 09-07-2003 - 1:20pm
thank you thank you!!!!!!!!

I was at my wits end with all of the "advice" and what not....

I am not really dreading the surgery recovery since I have had 6 abdominal surgeries inthe past two years- so at least THAT won't be a surprise! And if its painful, at least I'll know what kind of pain to expect!

And I am so relieved about the diet- I have been drinking caffiene my whole life! I tried to give it up until my OB told me that in moderation caffiene was fine for the baby. For some reason caffiene doesn't keep me up at night or affect me like it does other people i know and the baby doesn't seem to react either way to it in utero. I drink a soda, the baby still sleeps. Its strange!

Anyway I REALLY appreciate your advice!!!!

You all are so great!

I'll keep checking back for more posts!

thanks!

~Stacie

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sun, 09-07-2003 - 2:56pm
how great you are doing so much research before hand...better to be prepared. i really had no preconcecived notions about the ease or difficulty of bf. the truth is, it's hard the first few weeks, but try to take it "take one at day time." i know very few people who made it through the first month and still quit -- in my case, it just got easier and easier.

with my son (who i eventually bf'd 17 mos), i had a nightmare time (no section, but i pushed for 5.5 hours and was extremely sore). he also was 10lbs and i found it hard to hold him with my weak arms. i took several perocet and all was fine.

his latch was poor and i had cracked, bleeding nipples, awful engorgement and little help. i thankfully found a great lactaction consultant (4 states away) who talked me "off the roof" at 11pm on a friday night. that said, support is KEY. unfortunately, not all lactation consultants are perfect -- you may need to get varying opinions should you run into issues (the bf board here at 'soup in great). make sure you have savoy cabbage in the fridge once you get home -- its helpful if you have engorgemnt issues (see support board for specifics).

as far as supplementing goes, i think very few people realize that a "cluster feeding" baby is not doing so because you have no milk, but rather to help you build up supply. if you supplement, you actually do a diservice to the baby's efforts to make the supply meet his needs. the actual percentage of women who "don't make enough" milk is VERY low (as evidenced by 99% successful bf rates in countries like australia).

lastly, i eat what i want. broccoli is the only food i avoided. and, now that my dd is 6 mos old its really not an issue. i haven't had a problem with chocolate either, but in all honesty, i don't really eat it much. as far as caffeine goes, i'm a decaf fiend, but i cut out caffiene before i ever had kids.

p.s. do you have a "boppy?" would be good to have on hand since you are having a section. also, from my neighbor (who had 2), i understand that side-lying also works weel in the first few weeks.

GOOD LUCK!!!!!

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sun, 09-07-2003 - 3:18pm
"I am having a c-section next monday (the 15th!) and am experiencing the first time mom jitters. Everyday I get calls from people that tell me how terrible life with a newborn is for the first few months, and how my life will never be the same, etcetcetc."

I don't think life is terrible at ALL with a newborn. Sure, it's hard. It's a very big change that takes a lot of adapting to. That is the case no matter how you feed. But terrible? No...you're too much in love with your baby to consider it terrible. ;-)

Congrats on your upcoming baby...hope everything goes well for the section. I guess I should start out saying that the meds used in the c-section CAN and do generally get through to the baby and babies born after c-sections are often sleepier than they would have been without the meds. Some babies nurse beautifully right away, but others take a while to wake up. This can cause problems in the case of a baby with low blood sugar who is too sleepy to nurse properly. In this case, you may have to express some colostrum and cup-feed it. If you want to successfully breastfeed, it is better to try and avoid giving any artificial nipples (paci's or bottles) until bf. is well-established, usually around 4-6 weeks. That doesn't mean that someone who uses a paci from 2 weeks will automatically have problems...but the longer you wait the fewer probles you're likely to have. If your baby is not sleepy, TRY to get him to nurse as soon as possible. In the most baby-friendly establishments, the nurse will help you put your baby to the breast even while they're closing you up from your section, though if you have to wait until after that usually it's not so very long. Try and be allowed to hold your baby as soon as possible so s/he can "imprint" your smell into his/her brain to know where his food source will be. This will help too.

" Basically I think these are the types of people that love to complain about things because after they go on and on about how dreadful life with a fussy newborn is I'll ask them if they would rather trade their babies in to have their old lives back and they all say no!"

LOL...well, that's the thing: it's fun to complain to ppl who know what it's like. That doesn't mean you'd trade it. ;-) I complain to my bf buddies about bf problems, but I know they won't tell me to wean when that's not the answer I want, any more than my MIL (who didn't bf) would tell me to send the baby back if I complained about her pooping 10 times in a day. ;-)

"So everybook I have says that if BF is done right, you shouldn't have sore nipples. my friends laugh at that."

Well, the books are right that the nipples SHOULDN't hurt. That doesn't necessarily mean they WON't. If they DO that means you need help correcting a problem and try and get help as soon as possible. Lots of moms DO get sore nipples to begin with, b/c of latch problems, but if you get it corrected quickly, it should be short-lived.

"The books say no pacifier for at least 6 weeks, my friends laugh at that too. "there is no such thing as nipple confusion" they say."

Nipple confusion DOES exist. Not all babies will get it. And it is not a black or white area...some have various shades of grey, ie you don't konw they have nipple confusion until they are suckling the wrong way and diminishing your supply without even making you sore (just one example). It's not always outright refusal of the breast or the bottle. It's funny how ppl are quick to say their baby prefers only one type of bottle teat (say Playtex disposable flat-top kind) or that you "HAVE" to give a bottle before x time or else the baby will never accept one, and yet can't see that the opposite is also true: babies CAN and DO sometimes refuse the breast after just one bottle. The longer you wait for your baby to age a bit and realize that there is not just one way of doing things, the less likely this is to happen. However, it is not written on your baby's forehead when they're born if they will be easily nipple-confused or not, which is why there is the outright recommendation to avoid bottles to begin with. Obviously some switch fine from one to the next from day one.

If it's a risk you don't mind taking, by all means use bottles and/or paci's to begin with, just keep your eyes open to possible troubles and be ready to make a choice if they occur: perhaps go to straight breast nothing else while the trouble is being resolved.

" Of course my plan isn't to supplement with formula, but then my friends tell me that they have all done that when their baby was starving, or when their milk hasn't come in yet, or when they were just too drained or sore to BF."

Well, of the ppl I know who were DETERMINED to make it happen, very few have supplemented. Most have supplemented with EBM (expressed breastmilk) if necessary...i.e. baby isn't latching on properly, they pump or hand-express some milk and give it by cup. Supplementing isn't necessarily formula...and yes, growth spurts can be tedious and it's hard if your baby seems hungry and you don't feel like you've got enough, but there are other ways of finding out if you do than just listening to him/her scream while nursing. ;-) Counting wet diapers, noting weight increase, noting swallowing while nursing (or even gulping) all help. I know one lady who thought she didn't have enough milk when she was nursing her first...but she admitted to washing *18* cloth diapers per day. Her DS wasn't just peeing water, since she wasn't giving him any...so it had to be her milk that he was getting PLENTY of! ;-)

" Also the diet- its SO strict! So again, my friends are telling me that they ate chocolate ice cream and had an occasional soda with no adverse effects on BF."

The diet of a bf mom is NOT strict at all. In fact, some things one can't eat while PG one can eat fine while BF. But basically, it's best to keep to a well-balanced diet and not try and pig out on any one thing. Lots of babies will be fine with a bowl of ice cream a few times a week, and a few chocolate bars here and there and yeah, the occasional soda...but if you go and eat a 2L tub of ice cream all by yourself, plus a galon of milk plus a large extra-cheese pizza, it could cause trouble. Or if you eat a huge coleslaw, or lots of garlic at one sitting, or any other overly flavourful item (or an item known for causing allergies sometimes). It's a matter of moderation, not elimination. ;-)

If you eat a few bowls of ice cream with no trouble, and then go to pig out on 2L of ice cream and there is no problem, then you know you're fine...it's more ppl who haven't been eating *whatever* during pgcy b/c of one reason or another (GD, or pre-eclampsia or whatever) and then go pig out on it ASAP when they've given birth...and then the baby reacts. Some babies react to nothing, some react to lots of things...most are in between and won't react to anything if you eat moderat amounts of it, but MIGHT react to one or 2 things if eaten in large amts.

" Here is another thing- I am having a c-section and the books say not to take narcotics for pain relief because they pass into breastmilk. Two of my friends had C-sections and took percocet without any adverse effect on BF."

Of course you can take some pain relievers while BF. What "books" are you reading BTW??? Some may be fine for general childcare but are not great in the bf. info. There is an excellent ressource called Hale's Medications for Mother's MILK and it lists the drugs that are BF compatible and which aren't.

"I am just so frustrated because the things I have read are all 100% BF all the way.. no formula, no pacifiers, no caffiene, chocolate, etcetc. But I would really love some advice that is a little more laid back. My goal is to have BM be my baby's primary form of nutrition, and to be able to do it successfully. If reading that pacifiers will hurt my success with BF then I don't want to give my baby one. On the same note if supplementing with formula or eating certain foods are bad for BF success I won't want to do that either. But will my baby REALLY suffer if I stick a pacifier in his mouth when he's inconsolable?"

If you've tried other ideas and nothing's working, then you can always try that...it might work with some babies, might not with others. Like I say, if you can tough it out until past 6 weeks on the paci, there is less chance of nipple confusion. But paci's can be very useful tools, ie for the baby who is inconsolable in the car where you can't nurse anyhow! :-)

HTH, and GL!

Fio.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sun, 09-07-2003 - 3:21pm
"try to take it "take one at day time." i know very few people who made it through the first month and still quit "

I have a friend who has successfully nursed 4 kids. Her 4th was so hard she said had she had him first, she might not have continued. Having learned more since #1, she did persevere with #4 and he's 14 mos and still going strong.

Her recommendation to new moms tho, is to not quit while the going is really tough. She spent the first 6 mos fluctuating between wanting to quit and things being ok, in about a 2 week cycle: she'd want to quit during one week, then the next week things woudl seem ok. Her DH got her through it by saying every time she said she'd had it and couldn't continue any longer: "look dear, things are going badly now, but how about keeping it up until they're going well before making any rash decisions". She was really glad later that he supported her that way so well.

Fio.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-31-2003
Sun, 09-07-2003 - 4:25pm
HI Stacie! I had an emergency Csection in March. From the get go I knew there was no other choice but to breastfeed. In the end my situation laid everything up AGAINST US for successful breastfeeding (he was a preemie, in the NICU for 17 days, my milk took 4 days to come in , etc etc etc). My husband and I made some tough and strong decisions to enable Baylor to succeed at breastfeeding and I urge you to consider the same. It is so much easier to set one's self up for success then to set one's self up for failure- don't consider failing an option! ;) Here's a list of our RULES for ourselves and the care of our preemie in the NICU:

NO BOTTLES/NO FORMULA/NO PACI's (this is sooooo important- hold strong to your convictionas as those who SHOULD support this stance often don't ie, docs and nurses). Baylor had a feed tube w/ donor milk for his first 3 days then a feed tube w/ my ebm for 10 days + bf'ing as often as he could tolerate...). Have the nurses put a big sign on your babies crib stating this desire/rule.

DON'T OVERPUMP: For some reason people are always pushing for pumping pumping pumping in the hospital and it will cause you erratic supply and more discomfort...

HAVE FAITH: in your own body and your babies ability. Breastfeeding is how a baby should be fed- end of story! To think he/she may fail at this is stating your baby cannot thrive, live... and that's silly! Your baby will figure it out, your body will figure it out and you will figure it out. I think it took 3-4 months of breastfeeding for me to be totally comfortable and intune with doing it and believing in it. but it was SO worth it. ANother tip- nipple creams, etc. I was a nipple-lube addict but learned that NOT using it is best in the long run. YES your nipples will be sore for a bit- yes you may get engorged with milk. But it will pass. When my milk first came in I was HUGE and so pained. I took a wet towel, microwaved it to as hot as I could stand and wrapped the breasts in it... ahhhhh relief. It also feels good to let hot shower water run on them. If youre so full your baby can hardly latch on maybe pump for a minute or two to relieve the pressure.

All in All- just believe you're doing the BEST thing for your baby. Don't panic and bring formula into your home "just in case".... that's supporting the idea of failure! Have the number to your local LaLeche rep with you or call them NOW and introduce yourself.

Good Luck! There's a wonderful breastfeeding support board on ivillage too!

-Kimberley & Baylor

vegiemom@msn.com - email me anytime! ;)

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-10-2001
Wed, 09-10-2003 - 12:54pm
WOW!! Only one week to go......very exciting...Congratulations!

Ok, I haven't read anyone's response before posting. My dd is 4.5 months and I chose to pump exclusively and feed breast milk in a bottle. This worked out wonderful for us and after only 4 mos of hard work I have enough breast milk in a freezer to feed her through her first year (breast milk for 6 mos. and then supplementing with some formula). First, about supplementing with formula in the beginning. The dr. at the hospital had me do it. Why? To this day I'm not sure. I began pumping within hours of my c-sec and fed my baby the colostrum. If I had chose to nurse, would they still have had me give my baby formula? Probably not. But I did supplement until my milk came in---I had my baby on a Wed. afternoon and my milk came in on Sat. afternoon. Since I kept good pumping habits,once my milk came in I never used formula again. I still have what the hospital sent home with me in a pantry. Don't let anyone tell you that pumping doesn't work, because with good pumping habits it can work. Most folks assume it doesn't work because of lack of information or bad information(like pump for only 10 minutes---this is crappy info). If you ever do need to pump be sure to use a good quality pump. The Advent Isis is a good one for occassional pumping(like for an occassional night out without baby) and the Medela is a good choice for more frequent pumping(for daily use). The hospital will provide you with a pump if you ask and they should have some for rental if you ever need one. If you have any questions on pumping please feel free to ask--email me if you want.

Next, about the pacifier---My own opinion is that if a baby is exclusivly nursed then the baby should use mom as a pacifier. My reasoning behind this is because of nipple stimulation to help aid in milk production. Once milk production and nursing are established then go ahead and offer a paci if you want. Nipple confusion I know nothing about. But I will add this, even though my baby is bottlefed, she has taken a couple of different nipples without any problems. I've offered 3 different pacifiers--2 she took without problems, 1 paci she hated. I've also offered her several types of bottle nipples. She took ALL of them without any problems so I picked one based on what I liked best for her.

Now about the diet, I did have to limit my caffine and chocolate in-take because I noticed it made my baby VERY fussy. But once we realized she has reflux and started treating her for it I didn't have to be so strict. The thing to remember with your eating and breast feeding is that just like when you are pg., your baby will get everything he/she needs first and then your body will get what's left. If you don't eat good this could leave you completley drained. So take your vitamins and get lots of rest. I was pretty much ate wht I wanted---even had some champange at a wedding.

I did nurse my ds when he was born, that experience is one reason I decided to just pump this time around. Nursing my ds and pumping for my dd both left me with sore nipples. It was just until my nipples some time to "toughen up" and after a few weeks this passed. A really good cream is made (I can't think if the name if it right now) to help with any soreness. If your baby is a real "super sucker"(you might think if you put 'em to the wall he/she will stay by their suction power) then it will hurt regardless of how "right" you do it.

After both of my c-sec the dr. had a demerol pump connected to my epidural and then after that I could have vicoden. 2 pills every 6 hours as needed and in between I had ibprofen(sp?). My best advice regarding pain and a c-sec. is to get up and start walking as soon as possible!! It will hurt the first time(and probably the 2nd time, but use the bed rail to help you out) and you will look a hunch-back(and the blood that comes running down your leg will freak/gross you out), but you've got to start walking as soon as the cath somes out. It helps your recovery faster and helps get your bowels working again (your dr. and nurses will be very interested in your bodily functions after a c-sec). After my first c-sec I looked and felt like I'd been hit by a truck, but after my second when I got out of bed ASAP, I was on pain meds for 4 days and I was out driving and felt great on day 5.

Ok, I've rambled on. If you have any further questions regarding c-secs or pumping please ask. And again congrats on your little baby. Good for you on all your reading and for asking questions---what a great mom you'll be!! You'll be able to make informed decision with all the knwlege you've gained.

Crystal SAHM to Alec(6) and Elise(4.5 mos)

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Alexa

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-29-1999
Wed, 09-10-2003 - 2:26pm
My DS's latch was so bad, I was taking percocet before BFing b/c it hurt so badly...

I'm sure my ob/gyn wouldn't have prescribed it if it wasn't totally safe!

Christi

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