How much sugar is in formula?

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
How much sugar is in formula?
29
Thu, 02-16-2012 - 2:20pm

Enfamil Premium and Parent's Choice premium infant formulas had the highest sugar content, at 13.5 and 12.4 grams per serving. The amounts are high but experts say the type of sugar revealed is the best: lactose, the same type found in breast milk.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2010
Thu, 02-16-2012 - 2:45pm

This seems pretty meaningless too me without a comparison to the amount of sugar in breast milk.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Mon, 02-20-2012 - 11:01pm

It is difficult to compare the sugar in formula with the sugar in breastmilk, because it is so different. Breastmilk is very sweet, but it is comprised of lactose and other complex sugars. Formula is not required to contain lactose or more complex sugars (oligosaccarides). Sucrose (table sugar) and fructose, if I remember correctly, are "sweeter" than lactose, so formula manufacturers can add "less" sugar than breastmilk has. Superficially, that might seem "healthier". But, as they say, it's not nice to fool Mother Nature.

How does one surmise how much sucrose or fructose or any other sugar is equivalent to the amount of lactose and oligosaccarides that breastmilk contains?

Are high levels of sucrose, maltose,

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2010
Tue, 02-21-2012 - 12:51pm
nisupulla wrote:

It is difficult to compare the sugar in formula with the sugar in breastmilk, because it is so different. Breastmilk is very sweet, but it is comprised of lactose and other complex sugars. Formula is not required to contain lactose or more complex sugars (oligosaccarides). Sucrose (table sugar) and fructose, if I remember correctly, are "sweeter" than lactose, so formula manufacturers can add "less" sugar than breastmilk has. Superficially, that might seem "healthier". But, as they say, it's not nice to fool Mother Nature.

I don't get what's so difficult about it.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Tue, 02-21-2012 - 1:31pm

>>Formula is more like breast milk than cow's milk is. <<

Right. Similarly, in terms of degree, formula is more like evaporated milk + Karo + vitamins than it is to breastmilk. IOW, it is not much like breastmilk at all.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Tue, 02-21-2012 - 1:38pm

>>The fact that you can't add anywhere near all of them is no reason not to attempt to add as many as you can,>>

I don't think anyone disagrees that formula manufacturers should continue to try to make a better breastmilk substitute.

The issue, as I see it, is formula close enough to breastmilk that the decision not to breastfeed can be taken lightly. The IFC would say, yes, do not sweat it, formula is close enough, it is fine. I think that is deceitful, profit-minded rhetoric.

The decision whether or not to breastfeed -- matters,

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Tue, 02-21-2012 - 1:41pm

http://journeytocrunchville.wordpress.com/2008/05/21/breastmilk-can-not-be-imitated-the-dhaara-fallout-and-oligosaccharides/

>>Despite how hard the Formula Companies would try and have you believe that formula is equivalent to breastmilk it is most definitely not. Their often touted slogan “closest to breastmilk” is a ridiculous statement. Not only because formula is nothing close to breastmilk but because that statement can only be made because there is little alternative out there not because it is actually close to breastmilk, it is only closest. I tried to think of a similar and clever “closest to” statement but I couldn’t come up with anything. Maybe you can think of something clever.

Now before I go further with this I need to state that there is a time and place for formula. It is a necessary product that has saved many infants lives and no mother that finds the need to use formula should be made to feel guilty about that. My intent with this post and the research that I put forward is not to belittle those mothers that currently or have in the past fed their children formula. My problem with formula is not its existence but the companies that produce it and the way they market it and cleverly undermine many would-be breastfeeding mothers from taking their natural course in nature’s intended food for baby. I also don’t appreciate how that in the end it is the bottom line and not for the well being of the child that things do or don’t get added to formula. I don’t doubt that there are women and children out there that *need* to formula feed. They exist and formula should be there for them. However, in-arguably, formula is not close to breastmilk and hard as they may try it probably never will be. We can sugar coat it all we want (and the formula companies spend a majority of their money doing this) but breastmilk can not be imitated.<<

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Tue, 02-21-2012 - 1:46pm

>>I don't get what's so difficult about it.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-13-2008
Wed, 02-22-2012 - 4:32am
nisupulla wrote:

>>I don't get what's so difficult about it.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008
Thu, 02-23-2012 - 12:42am
jessica765 wrote:

It is impossible for formula to ever be "identical to breastmilk."

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2010
Thu, 02-23-2012 - 11:21am
teresagem wrote:

Oligosaccharides could be described as moderately complex sugars with an important and irreplaceable role to play.

Even with the simpler sugars, the behaviour in our body can still be different, in terms of insulun response, and possibly even the laying down of fat cells. The evidence shows that diabetes type 1 is more common in children who were FF as babies. This is a serious life-long disease, with many possible serious consequences, that could even lead to blindness, amputation and so on if not well controlled. Even when well-controlled, sometimes people can still have short term events like hypoglycemia that can lead to collapse. For a young child or even a teen to have to deal with this illness is complex. That is not to say that some BF children do not get this disease, but FF children develop it more often.

So I would not dismiss simple sugars as not being that important in the differences between each one.

Teresa

The article posted was about the simple sugars (lactose, sucrose, fructose) that are present in breastmilk or formula as the main carbohydrate source, so that's what I was referring

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