The impact of breastmilk......

Avatar for cl_sunny_side_up
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
The impact of breastmilk......
7
Fri, 09-19-2003 - 12:37pm
I have been wondering and kicking around this idea and question in my head. I don't really have an answer myself.


I look at my youngest son and begin to wonder why his feeding problem had such an enormous impact on him. I mean, we're talking about only 9 months or so of his "problem." He had GERD, was in constant pain..and so wouldn't eat. He eventually had surgery to correct the problem. And it has. However, for the past 11months we have been dealing with his food and oral aversions sparked by his original "problem." He sees a therapist on a weekly basis to combat his unwillingness and seeming un happy eating experience. It amazes me that in his short life he has had such a turbulent existence. I mean, how could something that was only a part of him for such a short time....have such an impact on him?? It seems we are attempting to undo "damage" caused by his "problem." A problem that was around for less time than we have been working(and continue to work on)on getting him back on track.


So....now on to my question. Can breastmilk have such an impact?? What impact does it actually have or CAN have??


christine


~christine~

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-31-2003
Fri, 09-19-2003 - 6:37pm
I am not sure I would call it an "impact" feeding your child lays down the foundation, if you will, for all of lifes' normalcy.

Formula feeding (in my opinion, and that of MANY others including professionals) has more of an impact on a baby. Impact meaning it brings them down to a level that they will be working up from. The fact that food and love are combined (as baby is usually fed by everyone and not just Mom- where as a bf'd baby gets love from people totally NOT associated w/ food) is just the beginning of the impact of formula. It's a fact that formula fed babies are like 75% more likely to be obese adults.... hmmmmm

anyway. That's where I stand. Breastfeeding doesn't have an "impact" like something a child will be affected by forever. It just lays the wonderful groundwork for the best possible life.

Kim berley & Baylor

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-10-2001
Sat, 09-20-2003 - 11:19am
I think this situation is more of a "feeding issue" in general then a "breast milk vs. formula issue". For young babies eating is a huge part of thier young lives. Surely, we've all heard someone say all newborns do is "eat, sleep, and poop". For most babies eating is soothing and relives pain (hunger pains). For a baby with reflux or GERD, they have hunger pains from not eating and pain when they do eat (poor babies). I can see where even a wee little one would notice early on that if they don't eat then they only have to suffer from the pain of not eating and perhaps that is more tolorable then pain caused by eating. I think a baby who is nursed could very possible have the same reaction as your ds, because I think this is a feeding issue. IMO, the impact of breast milk is all the things babies can't get from formula. The mother's immunites that help guard aginst allergies and illness and since breast milk is the most easily digested food it goes easy on thier developing digestive system. Will breast milk help for an entire lifetime? I don't know, for my dd's sake, I sure hope so. But as my dd becomes an adult her own eating habits and amount of stress in her life will play a big part of her health. But I know that the breast milk she gets now gives her a great start in the right direction.

Crystal SAHM to Alec(6) and Elise(5 mos next week)

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Alexa

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Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 09-20-2003 - 12:34pm
I believe that infants with GERD who are bf have less pain than if they aren't bf, which is perhaps one reason why they show fewer eating problems?

Fio.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-10-2001
Sat, 09-20-2003 - 11:49pm
True, True. That's because breast milk is so much easier digested. After I had my dd the hospital handed me all kinds of information and one thing they gave me was talking about all the benefits of breast milk. One of the advantages that really made an impression on me was that breast milk in the early days provides the digestive track with some special coating that helps protect it. I can't remember exactly what it said and now I can't find the paper. But, as for GERD, babies just like everyone are different in the amount of pain they can tolerate.

Crystal

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Alexa

Avatar for kfira71
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sun, 09-21-2003 - 8:23pm
<<"It's a fact that formula fed babies are like 75% more likely to be obese adults">>

It's a "fact"? Really? Not according to what I've read. Do you have any studies to back up your claim?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11236725&dopt=Abstract




Edited 9/21/2003 8:31:11 PM ET by kfira71

~Kim

"Becoming a parent means agreeing to allow your heart to go walking around outside of your body."

Avatar for kfira71
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sun, 09-21-2003 - 8:29pm
Christine, you ask, <<"how could something that was only a part of him for such a short time....have such an impact on him?">>

But maybe if you look at it in terms of his life span, it's really not such a "short" time to him, percentage-wise, KWIM? Maybe if you think of it in terms of your own age, and take the same percentage of time where you might have had to face such difficulties, it might make more sense? I don't know if I'm being clear, but basically, nine months is a pretty long time if it makes up a large part of the time he's been alive (i.e. 9 months out of 2 years, or however old he currently is).

~Kim

"Becoming a parent means agreeing to allow your heart to go walking around outside of your body."

Avatar for cl_sunny_side_up
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Sun, 09-21-2003 - 8:53pm
Yes.

Yours and "vegiemom"'s post made the most sense to me.


christine


~christine~