Just believing something strongly is good enough?

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Just believing something strongly is good enough?
4
Mon, 05-23-2011 - 11:21am

I came across this comment in reference to something else:

"It's also easier now to filter all the news and knowledge you get so that you simply never encounter views different from your own. I see in my freshman comp classes that the idea of having to support claims beyond just believing something strongly is very foreign to our younger citizens. That could have some strong real world consequences, too."

and I wondered - if this was true, how much harder our debate would become. If the formula companies convince new moms that they can't make enough milk and that formula is just as good - perhaps nothing breastfeeding advocatesd say or do will make any difference?

Children who grow up watching tv commercials may become indoctrinated into the world of marketing, ready to accept anything the formula companies tell them.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-13-2008

Given the people who believed the world was going to end several days ago, or perhaps at the end of next year, then sure, some people do lack discernemnt.

In the information age, one of the greatest literacy issues is teaching young people to be discerning about what they read.

Teresa

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-04-2004
teresagem wrote:

In the information age, one of the greatest literacy issues is teaching young people to be discerning about what they read.

I completely agree. I've been out of the field for 6 years now, but I was an English teacher at the secondary school level before I had my children. It was actually shocking to me to see how many students who, even in their final year of high school, could not use reference guides like dictionaries or maps without extensive help, and who didn't know how to fact-check, or who just lacked any kind of skepticism about what they read. They didn't question or attempt to challenge themselves or anyone else on the information they were given, they just took it as writ. It was truly scary, and I doubt it can have gotten better in the few years since I last worked with adolescents.

Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008

To oversimplify it for arguments sake, let's say we can lump people into two categories: blind followers and skeptics.

"The key to good decision making is not knowledge. It is understanding."
Malcolm Gladwell Blink

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006

Children who grow up watching tv commercials may become indoctrinated into the world of marketing, ready to accept anything the formula companies tell them.

and I wondered - if this was true, how much harder our debate would become. If the formula companies convince new moms that they can't make enough milk and that formula is just as good - perhaps nothing breastfeeding advocatesd say or do will make any difference?

I think this is probably true and already happening. Since there have not always been good ways to verify what anyone else said about a product, it did come down to trust.

I personally believe that the tendency not to see the truth amid the myths strengthens the necessity for government and laws. For example, until they decided that second hand smoke was risky to non-smokers, the individual's right to smoke trumped the discomfort of the non-smokers in tight places such as airplanes.

At risk of prompting a nasty debate a la Gisele, I think there may very well be a time when the superiority of breastfeeding is acknowledged and laws are put in place to prohibit businesses and others from interfering with a mother's right to breastfeed her child. Those future laws would very much resemble the WHO Code.