Leukocytes in human milk

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Leukocytes in human milk
14
Wed, 10-29-2003 - 7:06am
Does anyone here believe there are no leukocytes (white blood cells) in human milk?

Fio.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Wed, 10-29-2003 - 7:13am

What has that got to do with a baby aspirating on bm, which is a foriegn substance to the lungs?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 10-29-2003 - 7:50am
I'm sure one has. How many have died from aspirating anything else in their lungs?

ALL I'm saying is, foreign substance or no...it causes fewer ear infections, fewer infections elsewhere in the body, why shouldn't the same be true of the lungs?

Fio.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Wed, 10-29-2003 - 8:11am

It might help the lungs, but not by aspiration, which would have a high chance of resulting in death or other extreme illness regardless of what the substance is.


Prescribed antibotics kill lots of bad things that cause lung problems....should that be aspirated too?


Avatar for cl_sunny_side_up
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Wed, 10-29-2003 - 8:13am

~christine~

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 10-29-2003 - 9:58am
Well, I feel dumb here! I thought the cut-off times had to do with the child throwing up, not that it could make things worse if the child aspirated(sp?).

My dentists office was running an hour and a half behind, so she hadn't had anything to eat or drink for 3 and a half hours. I wonder where the 2 hour mark for bm came from. Will have to talk to my LLL leader friend!

Sherry

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Wed, 10-29-2003 - 10:02am

Here is a link to my post on the board that has another link in it re: the information with anesthia:


http://messageboards.ivillage.com/n/mb/message.asp?webtag=iv-psbfvbottle&msg=900.21

Misty

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 10-29-2003 - 10:03am
I think I get what you are saying. Any liquid that is aspirated is dangerous. And bm in the lungs can cause death. However, if liquid is aspirated and the child doesn't die, then then if it's bm, the recovery time is quicker? Or death is less likely to happen? Or does aspiration always automatically result in death.

I think it would highly unlikely that there are any studies comparing the death rate of aspirating bm compared to other substances.

Sherry

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 10-29-2003 - 10:08am
I only had time to skim it. What I understood was that clear liquids are ok up to 2 hours and that it depends on what the "institution" classifies bm.

Sherry

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Wed, 10-29-2003 - 10:47am

They said in the study that more studies actually need to be done wrt bm before surgery because they don't have enough to go on wrt how it desolves in the stomach.


I really don't "understand" all of it, but I do know that clear liqueds disolve faster, thus leaving less of a chance to asphixiated then cloudy or solid liqueds.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 10-30-2003 - 8:24am
I'm wondering if I've got it mixed up (or someone else has...)? When I say "aspirated"...I mean you're eating or swallowing liquid and inhale some. I don't mean vomiting during surgery and inhaling 4 oz of vomit with stomach acid...

Maybe this will clarify something???

Fio.

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