NEWS: Illiterate moms mistake Nestle coffee creamer for formula

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
NEWS: Illiterate moms mistake Nestle coffee creamer for formula
9
Wed, 03-28-2012 - 9:14am

images-20.jpegNestle manufactures a coffee creamer that is sold throughout Laos under the name “Bear Brand.”

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-22-2007

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Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
true.blue.strine wrote:

Does anyone know how maternal malnutrition effects breastmilk production?

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010

I haven't found the debate we had about how much a mom needs to eat to make milk, but it was very small. I will keep looking...

But in the meantime, I did find the following:

Myths that put babies at risk

http://forums.ivillage.com/t5/No-Debate-Cafe/Do-not-donate-infant-formula-to-Haiti/m-p/87757602/highlight/true#M1540

From:

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-22-2007

>>A mother's milk supply adjusts to demand; only extremely malnourished mothers have a reduced capacity to breastfeed.<<

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-13-2008

For a very long time, Nestle has been a company that has quite deliberately engaged in misleading practices worldwide to get mothers to wean and switch to their products. They have been aware for a very long time that death of a huge number of babies in third world countries have resulted and still result from their actions, but although what they do is against WHO guidelines, it often is not illegal in the nations where they are carrying out these practices. Many developing nations do not really have much in the way of laws dealing with consumer products and advertising, or protection of their citizens from misleading or dangerous situations. You only have to look at an issue such as smoking, where we are used to seeing tighter and tighter restrictions on advertising and sale of tobacco products. Here in Australia, we have been a world leader in this legislation. Has this stopped tobacco companies. On the contrary, they have taken the opportunity to advertise even more strongly in countries without such restrictions.

It is the same with formula. In our countries, there may be say a restriction on advertising formula for under six month old babies. They may be required to print certain information about breastfeeding on the container.

But if there is no requirement, then it is a free for all.

Also then there is the tendency of people to want what they may believe is the best for their children. If formula is promoted as modern and easy and healthy, and no-one gives information to the contrary, then mothers may use it to follow the ways of the western world. Often at great expense and sacrifice. For some families in developing nations with very low incomes, the cost of formula uses all of their income.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006

>>Though I'm not sure why the article is focusing on Nestle instead of the bigger picture of aid and education.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-13-2008

Thanks for posting all those links, Nisu. It is a huge issue, and human rights are being ignored in the interests of profit.

Teresa

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008


true.blue.strine wrote:
If children are malnourished to the point of needing medical attention, it stands to reason that the mother is probably extremely malnourished.

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