Two questions

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Two questions
12
Tue, 07-31-2012 - 8:17pm

Based on the comments that I've seen online the prevailing attitude about breastfeeding is that it is a personal decision that should be made solely between the mom and the formula industry without interference from others- obviously, I disagree.

In terms of the new NYC hospital initiative, I have to two questions.

1) What information about breastfeeding is shared with a declared breastfeeding mom who asked for formula?

2) What information about breastfeeding, if any, is shared with a declared formula feeding mom?

 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2010
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 10:34am
nisupulla wrote:

Based on the comments that I've seen online the prevailing attitude about breastfeeding is that it is a personal decision that should be made solely between the mom and the formula industry without interference from others- obviously, I disagree.

In terms of the new NYC hospital initiative, I have to two questions.

1) What information about breastfeeding is shared with a declared breastfeeding mom who asked for formula?

2) What information about breastfeeding, if any, is shared with a declared formula feeding mom?

 

I don't have any answers, but I'd like to add a third question:

3) If the answers to #1 and #2 are different, can a mom change from being a "declared breastfeeding mom" to a "declared formula feeding mom" after birth?  How?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2010
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 11:03am
nisupulla wrote:

Based on the comments that I've seen online the prevailing attitude about breastfeeding is that it is a personal decision that should be made solely between the mom and the formula industry without interference from others- obviously, I disagree.

I just want to talk a little bit about what "interference" is.  Take these hypotheticals:

1.  I'm planning to make a salad for dinner, but there's a coupon for a free 12-inch Subway turkey sub on my kitchen counter that came in the mail, unsolicited.

2.  I'm planning to have a turkey sandwich for dinner, but there's a government PSA on the radio about the importance of eating more vegetables and/or the risks of eating too many processed carbohydrates and meats.

3.  I'm planning to make a salad for dinner, but I change my mind and decide that I'd like to have a turkey sandwich instead.  However, before I can buy the sandwich ingredients, I have to sit through a government-mandated talk about why I should make the salad instead.

4.  I'm planning to make a salad for dinner.  However, before I can buy the salad ingredients, my grocery store (which is the only one in the area and has a contract with Subway) requires me to sit through a Subway commercial.

Is the Subway coupon in #1 interference with my choice about what to have for dinner?  Is the PSA in #2 interference with my choice about what to have for dinner?  Is the government-mandated talk in #3 inteference with my choice about what to have for dinner?  Is the mandated commercial in #4 interference with my choice about what to have for dinner?  If they're all interference, are they comparable levels of interference?

I, and I think most people on "my" side of this debate, consider #1 and #2 not to be interference, or at least not to be the same level of interference as #3 and #4.  I don't think influence (even influence proven to be effective) = interference.   However, hoops you have to jump through before exercising your choice, particularly where they're government-mandated, do = interference.  People think that influence is one thing, but interference is quite another.  

(Note that people might object to the influence in #1 or #2 for other reasons, particularly depending on the content of the coupon or PSA.  What's particularly objectionable about #3 and #4 is that they interfere in a way that  #1 and #2 do not.  ) 

 

 

 

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 11:07am

From the NYC BMIHR - http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/ms/ms-pcc.shtml

Breastfeeding and Safe Sleep Information:

 

From: http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/pregnancy/html/after/breast-feeding.shtml

Learn about Latch On NYC: a citywide initiative to support mothers who choose to breastfeed.

Why Breastfeed?

NYC Mother's Guide to Breastfeeding

It's best for your baby:

  • Breast milk is filled with the vitamins and nutrients that your baby needs. It builds your baby's immune system and helps her brain develop.
  • Breast milk is easier to digest than formula, resulting in less spit-up and diarrhea.
  • Breastfed babies are less likely to become obese later in life.
  • Breastfed babies are less likes to get infections and to develop SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome), asthma, diabetes and other chronic conditions.

Check out these videos of real mothers talking about their experiences breastfeeding

It's best for you:

  • Breastfeeding helps your body recover from pregnancy and labor - shrinking your uterus back to size and reducing bleeding after birth.
  • Breastfeeding lowers your risk of getting diabetes, ovarian cancer and some forms of breast cancer.
  • Breastfeeding helps you bond with your baby.
  • Breastfeeding saves time and money. No bottles need to be washed and sterilized, and no formula needs to be bought.

 

From: http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/pregnancy/html/after/breast-feeding-latchon.shtml

Latch On NYC is a citywide initiative to support mothers who choose to breastfeed and limit practices that interfere with that choice. It involves both a hospital commitment to limit infant formula promotion and a public awareness campaign on the benefits of breast milk.

Hospitals joining Latch On NYC have agreed to:

  • Enforce the New York State hospital regulation to not supplement breastfeeding infants with formula unless medically indicated and documented on the infant’s
    medical chart
  • Limit access to infant formula by hospital staff
  • Discontinue the distribution of promotional or free
    infant formula
  • Prohibit the display and distribution of infant formula advertising or promotional materials in any hospital location

Additionally, the Health Department is launching a subway and hospital poster campaign highlighting the benefits of breast milk, such as reducing the risk of ear infections, diarrhea and pneumonia.

For more information on Latch On NYC:
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 11:26am

I don't have any answers,

Previously you said mothers will be given a lecture? Now, you don't know what information will be shared? You're not even certain if a declared formula feeding will have anything said at all?

I'm not following....

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 11:26am
In the "Best for You" category is the fact that breast feeding is relaxing due to release of natural hormones, and can aid with mom getting back to sleep after night time feedings!
Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 11:29am

Reading the Latch On NYC FAQ, I found:

What do we tell our staff to do when mothers (families) request infant formula?


While breastfeeding is healthier for both mothers and babies, staff must respect a mother’s infant feeding choice. Educating mothers and families about breastfeeding and providing encouragement and support, both prenatally and after birth, is the best way to ensure breastfeeding success in your hospital.


While in the hospital your staff can:
• Assess if breastfeeding is going well and encourage the mother to keep trying.
• Provide education and support to mothers who are experiencing difficulties.
• If the mother still insists on receiving formula, document it in the chart along with the reason and distribute only the amount of formula needed for the feeding.
• Train staff in breastfeeding support (CLC, IBCLC) who can be available to assist new mothers at all times regardless of day, night or weekends.

What do we tell our staff to do when mothers/families state that they want to both breastfeed and bottle feed their infants?


Although you want to encourage exclusive breastfeeding, your staff also needs to respect individual mother’s infant feeding choice. Here are some suggestions that your staff can use when mothers want to breastfeed and bottle feed in the hospital:


• Put all infants skin-to-skin immediately after delivery to increase bonding and start the first feeding.
• Educate mothers about the importance of establishing good milk supply even if they don’t plan to breastfeed exclusively.
• Encourage mothers to call hospital staff to help with breastfeeding first before introducing the bottles.

• If mothers choose to supplement encourage the use of other feeding methods, such as cup, dropper, syringe or spoon feeding.
• Encourage partners and family members to support mothers by doing chores, cooking, helping with other children and leaving feeding of the infant to the mother in the first few weeks to get the milk supply established.
• Encourage partners and family members to find other ways of bonding with the infant, such as skin-to-skin, bathing, changing diapers rather than encouraging formula feeding.
• Avoid leaving infant formula at the bedside and give it only when requested.

http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/downloads/pdf/ms/ms-latchonnyc-faq.pdf

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2010
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 11:38am
nisupulla wrote:

I don't have any answers,

Previously you said mothers will be given a lecture? Now, you don't know what information will be shared? You're not even certain if a declared formula feeding will have anything said at all?

I'm not following....

 

 

Maybe you should go back and read my posts. I said women who ask for formula will be given a lecture, because the article that started the other thread said, "The New York Post reports new mothers will not be denied formula, but if requested, they'll receive a mandated talk from staffers and nurses on why they should opt out."  A mandated talk on why you should do something  = a lecture, in my book.

What I I do not know, and have never claimed to know, is (1) the specific content of the lecture (what exactly is said), or (2) whether the specific content of the lecture is identical for breastfeeding and formula feeding moms.   Because the links did not state what it was.  But, regardless of the specific content, giving women a mandated talk on why they should opt out of giving formula  is objectionable in my book.

Following now?   

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 11:45am

Nurses are busy people. I can't see that they will have the time to be giving a full lecture with every bottle, 6 times a day with dozens of patients. If nothing else, with so many patients, it would become rote and they would put no emotion and effort into it after a while.

It would just would become, "Breastfeeding is important. Formula is risky. Blah, blah, blah. Here's your bottle"

I can't help thinking it will be like when you get a new prescription. It is mandated here that you have to talk to the pharmacist, who is supposed to discuss with you any risks, concerns or contra-indications of this particular medication.

But, all I have to say is yes, I have taken it before, and they hand me my medication.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 4:04pm

A "brief consult" from someone triggers very different emotions than a "lecture" from someone, wouldn't you say?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2010
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 7:59pm
It depends on what the "brief consult" involves. Are you quoting that language from somewhere?

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