We know better

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
We know better
64
Sat, 03-09-2013 - 10:04am

Yet another mother who tried desperately to breastfeed, had troubles and eventually quit.  Twice ~ with her first child and again with her second child.  Is anyone in a position to say yet again this is another mom who didn't try hard enough, and we know better?

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/the-purple-fig/women-struggling-to-breastfeed_b_2820088.html ("Breastfeeding Sucks")

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Tue, 03-12-2013 - 8:10am

>>I can be happy that I live in a country where I am "allowed" to decide not to use my own breasts to feed my baby without having to demonstrate to some third party why I "can't." <<

That seems silly. It implies that there are places where mothers have to justify their decision to use formula to others. Where on earth do such places exist? Who wants such places to exist? Why create the illusion that they do?

IMO, it's yet another strawman. "Lactivists think mothers should have to make all kinds of sacrifices in order to breastfeed. If they don't they should have to explain themselve and be made to feel guilty. Therefore Lactivists are bad and should be ignored."

The reality is that in a Baby Friendly Hospital a mother who asks for formula because she does not want to breastfeed gets formula. Any questioning of that is related to making sure she isn't resorting to formula because her breastfeeding efforts are not working out. In the latter case, more breastfeeding support would be provided. IOW, the questioning is a reflection on the staff and their ability to provide breastfeeding support, not a reflection on the mother and/or her efforts.

I can certainly see how the questioning could be construed differently. After all, articles like this one abound. Comments about access to formula being threatened abound. Comments about mothers being judged abound.

Nobody is suggesting that mothers should feel guilty. No one is suggesting not having access to formula. It is about having equal access to quality lactation care. It is a terrible disservice to postpartum mothers to imply otherwise.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2007
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 11:43pm

I know my situation is a little different but I DID breastfeed my 2 children. However, I was unable to produce enough milk to just breastfeed them despite doing EVERYTHING to up my milk production. With my first I exclusively breast fed for 4 months but she was soooo slow to gain weight and then eventually stopped (other wise healthy and happy baby)...my doctor HUMILIATED me to the point where I would weigh her on the scales at grocery stores...well I soon switched doctors who told me to supplement with formula which helped a lot! 

It was just amazing, the ammount of dirty looks I would get when bottle feeding my daugher, even comments from mothers who only breast fed. I DID breast feed! And didn't even need that much formula...anyway, all I'm saying is that every situation is unique!

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2007
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 11:43pm

I know my situation is a little different but I DID breastfeed my 2 children. However, I was unable to produce enough milk to just breastfeed them despite doing EVERYTHING to up my milk production. With my first I exclusively breast fed for 4 months but she was soooo slow to gain weight and then eventually stopped (other wise healthy and happy baby)...my doctor HUMILIATED me to the point where I would weigh her on the scales at grocery stores...well I soon switched doctors who told me to supplement with formula which helped a lot! 

It was just amazing, the ammount of dirty looks I would get when bottle feeding my daugher, even comments from mothers who only breast fed. I DID breast feed! And didn't even need that much formula...anyway, all I'm saying is that every situation is unique!

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-16-2010
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 9:51pm

misstrygg wrote:
<p>I am utterly happy I live in a country where we arent allowed to leave hospital until we  have one sucessful nursing or  found out why we cant.  Formula isnt a choice here, it is the last option.</p>

Despite my anger at the absolutely terrible breastfeeding support provided by my hospital, at least I can be happy that I live in a country where I am "allowed" to decide not to use my own breasts to feed my baby without having to demonstrate to some third party why I "can't." 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 5:40pm

misstrygg wrote:
<p>I am utterly happy I live in a country where we arent allowed to leave hospital until we  have one sucessful nursing or  found out why we cant. </p>

ITA

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-16-2004
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 5:14pm

I am utterly happy I live in a country where we arent allowed to leave hospital until we  have one sucessful nursing or  found out why we cant.  Formula isnt a choice here, it is the last option.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 3:46pm

[quote=thardy2001]<p>The article was clear that the new mom got plenty of support in the hospital.  So much so, that she and another new mom felt they better HIDE their bottles of formula.</p>

That does not even make sense. How can a mom get support AND feel like she can not freely feed her baby??

The article as written makes it quite clear that she did not get the information and support that she needed. She claims that no medical professional was able to tell her in clear terms why breastfeeding is better than formula.

In fact, her pediatrician told her that breastfeeding doesn't really matter, "Just so you know, there are discrepancies about the scientific evidence that breast milk will, for example, produce a smarter baby or prevent Cancer, or that a formula-fed baby will have a weaker immune system."

Besides quoting the pediatatrian's faulty opinion, the article is filled with many inaccuracies about breastfeeding that other moms may read and believe. It is unfortunate that the Huffington Post published it.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 2:42pm

nisupulla wrote:
<p>We seem to disagree about whether or not breastfeeding is a straight forward task that anyone can figure out or whether it is more like riding a bike - at the beginning it requires some knowledge and support.</p><p>Without the necessary knowledge and support many mothers will not breastfeed. Do I believe that the average postpartum nurse has been adequately trained in breastfeeding management? NO.</p><p>If a mom says that she did everything the nurse suggested, will I think that is enough?

The article was clear that the new mom got plenty of support in the hospital.  So much so, that she and another new mom felt they better HIDE their bottles of formula.  It's a sad comment that their first experience with their newborns was to hide from breastfeeding propaganda.

nisupulla wrote:
No. I don't think the average nurse knows the necessary information. It has nothing to do with the mom and/or how "hard" she tried or didn't try. It has to do with the mom not having access to breastfeeding support.

The average new mom in Africa faced with breastfeeding or with foamy water the color brown, tainted with feces and toxins, quickly picks up on breastfeeing without a college degreed man or woman who went on to what you would consider adequate, not inadequate?, "training in breastfeeding management."

Women should be given free will and not have to hide bottles of formula in the hospital.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 7:51am
I agree. It's her breasts and her baby.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 7:49am

We seem to disagree about whether or not breastfeeding is a straight forward task that anyone can figure out or whether it is more like riding a bike - at the beginning it requires some knowledge and support.

Without the necessary knowledge and support many mothers will not breastfeed. Do I believe that the average postpartum nurse has been adequately trained in breastfeeding management? NO.

If a mom says that she did everything the nurse suggested, will I think that is enough? No. I don't think the average nurse knows the necessary information. It has nothing to do with the mom and/or how "hard" she tried or didn't try. It has to do with the mom not having access to breastfeeding support.

Pages