Who exactly needs formula?

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-16-2008
Who exactly needs formula?
32
Mon, 06-27-2011 - 11:45am

It's apparently not just for babies anymore...

http://similac.ca/en/products/similac_mom/

Do moms really need some special formula? Haven't we been birthing and breastfeeding babies for centuries without this? Is it all because they aren't selling as much baby formula now? Are the formula companies just crazy?

by sara photo sigbysara.jpg

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-04-2004
Mon, 06-27-2011 - 1:09pm

Ew.

I can see people drinking Ensure, for example, when they have problems that prevent them from taking in more solid forms of food. I can even see people bulking up their milk or juice with a protein supplement. But formula as a replacement for regular meals, in a typical healthy adult woman? That's pretty weird to me.

I wonder how much this product costs. I wonder how much the price of this product compares to a day's worth of healthy protein and fruits and vegetables, which would be a much healthier way for a busy new mom to nourish herself.

Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008
Mon, 06-27-2011 - 3:51pm
<>

I did a quick search and found out it sells for $12.99 Canadian in Canada which is about $13.16 U.S.. So far as I can feel it's not being sold in the U.S. yet though.

Photobucket

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-04-2004
Mon, 06-27-2011 - 4:52pm
charleen2008 wrote:
<>

I did a quick search and found out it sells for $12.99 Canadian in Canada which is about $13.16 U.S.. So far as I can feel it's not being sold in the U.S. yet though.

For what, six bottles? The picture shows three in a row, but I'll assume there's another row behind that, to make six. Even so, that seems a lot of money.

Photobucket
Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Mon, 06-27-2011 - 5:13pm
cavenyee wrote:

It's apparently not just for babies anymore...


Cradle to grave - that is their marketing plan.

"Pepsi has licensed its logo to appear on baby formula packaging. It really is cradle-to-grave marketing. "

"The ad business is constantly re-inventing itself. People tire of the repetition of TV advertising, even if it is funny and engaging. Schor’s talk was a fascinating tour of latest trends. Take viral marketing, for example. Individuals are recruited by a marketing company to use a particular product with friends and family in such a way as to encourage discussion about the product. Typically, they don’t reveal what their purpose is. There is no formal pitch. The situation is meant to appear as normal as possible. You may wonder how a few people using a product can affect sales. What most people don’t realize is that the company has several hundred people similarly engaged. The marketing agencies that engage in viral marketing are very careful about whom they recruit. Recruits are typically young and outgoing."

http://bctf.ca/publications/NewsmagArticle.aspx?id=8036

Sound familar? No? Think about formula gift packs...

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-04-2004
Mon, 06-27-2011 - 5:35pm

Look at Disney's plan to start marketing to parents while they're still in the hospital after giving birth. There were articles about that in the news this past winter. It's scary how insidious advertising and corporate greed can be.

Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-29-2010
Mon, 06-27-2011 - 8:15pm
Boy, I totally agree... This became abundantly clear to me recently when I took my 4 YO with me to the grocery store. I've never noticed it before because I'm usually alone, but taking him with me made it abundantly and painfully clear how much advertising is targeted to children. All they have to do is put a recognizable character on a product, and BAM, kid wants it, no matter what it is. I spent the whole time telling him 'no' to all these crap products (sugary cereal, yogurt, etc) that I'd never buy, just because it has a Disney character on it. It wasn't just kids' products either. We saw shampoo, sunscreen, and various other things. Thanks a lot marketing execs, for making me the bad guy. UGH Marketing to children is pure evil.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008
Mon, 06-27-2011 - 10:06pm
Yep, six bottles per pack. Now that price is the suggested retail price and apparently some Canadian moms have been able to get it for $10 Canadian at some places which amounts to about $1.60 Canadian per bottle at it's cheapest. At full MFSRP it would be amount $2 U.S. if it were sold here.

Photobucket

Community Leader
Registered: 06-10-2008
Mon, 06-27-2011 - 10:13pm
I'll admit I know nothing about meal replacement drinks but wouldn't it be cheaper just to get Ensure or Carnation Instant Breakfast or something like that if you needed this kind of thing? I mean, there's nothing special about the SImilac branded one, is there?
Photobucket
Community Leader
Registered: 06-10-2008
Mon, 06-27-2011 - 10:13pm
You're usually alone in the grocery store?? Lucky lucky girl!!
Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-04-2004
Tue, 06-28-2011 - 12:11am
frosted.cupcakes wrote:
Boy, I totally agree... This became abundantly clear to me recently when I took my 4 YO with me to the grocery store. I've never noticed it before because I'm usually alone, but taking him with me made it abundantly and painfully clear how much advertising is targeted to children. All they have to do is put a recognizable character on a product, and BAM, kid wants it, no matter what it is. I spent the whole time telling him 'no' to all these crap products (sugary cereal, yogurt, etc) that I'd never buy, just because it has a Disney character on it. It wasn't just kids' products either. We saw shampoo, sunscreen, and various other things. Thanks a lot marketing execs, for making me the bad guy. UGH Marketing to children is pure evil.

I know. The scariest one right now, to me, is Disney Princesses. I recently read Peggy Orenstein's "Cinderella Ate My Daughter", so I'll admit to being more fired up about the topic than I might otherwise be, but she discusses the sheer number of products being marketed under the DP advertising and branding scheme, and it was pretty mindblowing. So I went around my house looking for DP items; mind you, I only have one daughter, and she's only two years old. We have a nightlight (which we don't even use; it was a party favor and is still in its packaging), Band-Aids, a book, a growth chart sticker (meant for a baby/memory book) from the pediatrician, a purse, a shirt and a pair of socks. I don't remember buying ANY of this, but I probably did buy the Band-Aids; I have been known to give in to fun Band-Aids when I have coupons. But I'm positive everything else was a gift. I need to start specifically asking people NOT to give us any more DP stuff. :/

Photobucket

Pages