Death Penalty for Penn State?

Avatar for cmkristy
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-05-2005
Death Penalty for Penn State?
69
Thu, 07-12-2012 - 5:11pm

There was this big, respected university with an iconic legend as its football coach.

It also had a pedophile operating in its program.

School officials knew this back in 1998 and covered it up.

They chose this “humane” route of covering up, turning their backs and protecting themselves rather than kids for more than a decade as boys went on being raped in the campus showers and on football trips. They did this because it benefited them, was easier for them and protected what they valued most — the football program.

Penn State should get death penalty- http://msn.foxsports.com/collegefootball/story/penn-state-should-lose-football-privileges-dealth-penalty-in-wake-of-freeh-report-child-sex-abuse-071212

 

The author goes on to say that she believes the football program needs to come to an end at this time, partly because it will send a strong message to other schools and institutions.  She also says "A big reason this was allowed to happen was because the whole economy of Penn State was football. If you take that away, they might learn."

Do you agree?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Thu, 08-02-2012 - 11:20am
ommy94 wrote:

I guess I was looking for something more specific and maybe you already answered more specifically along the way, idk.

How do you feel people today are being punished? I don't know how that can be completely avoided considering this all took some time to get through the court system. Todays students and athletes are bound to feel some of the effects.

The people today are being punished in numerous ways.  The football team is being dismantaled by the NCAA allowing current players to transfer to other schools - they've already lost 1 of their best players.  This hurts the remaining players by making the team less competitive and potentially bringing in less fans & NFL scouts.  Future football players/students are hurt by the reduction of scholarships since less players can play on scholarship at Penn State....again, bringing in a less competitive football team for the next 4 years.  State College becomes the 3rd largest city in PA on game days....if you take away the competitiveness of the team it is a likely result that the game attendance will drop and this will have a negative impact on the entire community (restaurants, shops, hotels, etc.).  Not to mention that the football program is self-funding and also provides a majority of the funding for the other sports at Penn State....if revenues drop (as they likely will) this could be detrimental to the other sport programs at the school.

And how can you not hold the entire school somewhat responsible? Like I've said, the reporting years ago should have put everyone on high alert. The fact it continued shows otherwise.

I don't disagree that the ADMINISTRATION should have been on high alert after the 1998 incident, but to say that the entire school is responsible (even somewhat) is a huge stretch.  You mean to say that the students at the school should have been made aware of the 1998 allegations and been on alert for a (suspected) pedophile among them?  What ever happened to innocent until proven guilty? Sure, the faculty could have been alerted to the situation, but if the school had made a general/public announcement to all students & residents about these DROPPED charges I think they could have been hit with defamation of character charges?!?! 

What parts of the punishment are you opposed to and again, what do you think a proper punishment would be?

I'm opposed to the retraction of wins from 1998-2011, the loss of bowl eligibility for 4 years and the reduction of scholarships for 4 years

I'm OK with the fine, especially since the money is being directed to charities that support child abuse and helping victims of child abuse.  Though i don't think this fine should have come from the NCAA.

I think proper punishment is found in the criminal justice system -

1) Jerry Sandusky is behind bars

2) Gary Shultz & Tim Curley are facing perjury charges for lying during the grand jury testimony

3) if reporting of child molestation is mandated for people in these positions and they are found to have violated that mandate then jail time or removal from position is fit (which ever the approved course of action is for dealing with failure to report)

4) the victims are going to sue the school for "pain & suffering" and will likely win big

These are ways that the "guilty parties" can be punished without punishing and entire student population and town.  Punishing the individuals for their acts makes sense.....and punishing the university through fines & negative press will hopefully force it to change its policies in the future.  But the NCAA overstepped when it crushed the football program.....

 

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Thu, 08-02-2012 - 9:21am

I guess I was looking for something more specific and maybe you already answered more specifically along the way, idk.

How do you feel people today are being punished? I don't know how that can be completely avoided considering this all took some time to get through the court system. Todays students and athletes are bound to feel some of the effects.

And how can you not hold the entire school somewhat responsible? Like I've said, the reporting years ago should have put everyone on high alert. The fact it continued shows otherwise.

What parts of the punishment are you opposed to and again, what do you think a proper punishment would be?

Avatar for xxxs
Community Leader
Registered: 01-25-2010
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 5:21pm

First punish the guilty.  Let the criminal justce run it's course.  The NCAA has no business in this arena.  The current team members,coaches were not around so they should not be punished. 

dragowoman

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 5:06pm

I know, you've made your position perfectly clear. :smileyhappy: Sorry, I don't buy it. Once this was reported, there was a red flag that was continued to be ignored for years. Just because they were not part of the physical act, does not mean the school did not have a duty to look out for the welfare of all the students.

What punishment do you see as being fit?

Avatar for xxxs
Community Leader
Registered: 01-25-2010
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 2:50pm

kudos to ommy94 for the link to the WP op ed!  It was not as good a piece of writing as I expected.   It will be years before all of this is out before the public.  However, the present people had nothing to do with the happinings.  Punishing the innocent is not the way to go.  The NCAA needs to put the punishments of those guilty.  In this case they are exceeding their mandate to boot! 

dragowoman

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 2:18pm

What are you talking about Jams? Everything offered here, is someone's "opinion" ... lol The article is someone's opinion based on the facts. You may as well say everyone's report is someone's opinion. You are actually stating a top newspapers has no credibility ... that doesn't even make sense. We may as well chuck everyone's opinion then and close up the board. :smileywink:

As far as how I took anything, I posted my thoughts. Feel free to comment if you like. But, hey, if you want to continue to question the credibility of the Washington Post, I will go back to questioning your credibility concerning your opinions. *shrug*

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 1:17pm

Washington Post's story is not a credible one

Says who? lol ... it's one of the countries leading newspapers, but somehow, because you don't agree with it, you can't come up with anything better then to attack it's credibility?

I find the opinion it's not credible ... not credible.

And really, how do you know what administrators felt? Were you there? Do you know them? Are you a reporter? Did you perform a thorough investigation into the fact? Did you meet with the board? How do you know how they responded? Are you part of the community? Did you go to Penn State? Do you know anyone involved at all?   Are you a credible source?

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 1:04pm

newlywed, I was actually responding to specific statements about the situation being reporting in 1998, as if this was enough. There were also statements made to the effect that proper procedure was followed. If proper procedure was followed, it s clear, it wasn't enough, furthering my thoughts that more people failed these children then those directly involved.

Since this was reported, I would think everyone would be on high alert. IMO, this shifts my ideas on who should be involved in the punishments and who was responsible for the situation.

I wasn't commenting on whether or not people found it horrific or not.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 11:19am
ommy94 wrote:

When I read this, nothing else seems to matter and the defense is making excuses for what happened to these boys. Even this was even reported once, in 1998, this should have put everyone on high alert. Yet, the abuse went on for years afterward. And who cares if they followed procedure. Obviously, this procedure did nothing to keep these boys safe.

"Unfortunately, that is far from the investigation’s worst discovery. As if allowing an adult to continue sexually abusing children for more than a decade wasn’t bad enough, these officials somehow managed to put Mr. Sandusky’s victims at even greater risk. In 2001, for instance, after an assistant reported seeing Mr. Sandusky in the shower sexually assaulting a boy, the only person these men alerted was Mr. Sandusky himself, the only one who knew the boy’s identity. That Penn State’s administrators and coaches would actively engage in a cover-up is unconscionable, but their “striking lackof empathy” for the victims is horrifying.http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/penn-state-scandal-more-shocking-relevations/2012/07/12/gJQAbZEOgW_story.html"






I don't think anyone here is arguing that what happened to these boys wasn't horrific, or even that the lack of reporting wasn't morally deplorable.....I think what people here are saying is that the penalties handed down by the NCAA are punishing the innocent (current students, athletes, teachers, coaches, etc.) and not helping the true victims in this situation.

With the exception of the $60M fine which will be put towards Child Abuse charities can you tell us how the imposed sanctions on PSU help the victims or even punish the "monsters" (either Sandusky or those who failed to report)?

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 10:52am

When I read this, nothing else seems to matter and the defense is making excuses for what happened to these boys. Even this was even reported once, in 1998, this should have put everyone on high alert. Yet, the abuse went on for years afterward. And who cares if they followed procedure. Obviously, this procedure did nothing to keep these boys safe.

"Unfortunately, that is far from the investigation’s worst discovery. As if allowing an adult to continue sexually abusing children for more than a decade wasn’t bad enough, these officials somehow managed to put Mr. Sandusky’s victims at even greater risk. In 2001, for instance, after an assistant reported seeing Mr. Sandusky in the shower sexually assaulting a boy, the only person these men alerted was Mr. Sandusky himself, the only one who knew the boy’s identity. That Penn State’s administrators and coaches would actively engage in a cover-up is unconscionable, but their “striking lackof empathy” for the victims is horrifying.http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/penn-state-scandal-more-shocking-relevations/2012/07/12/gJQAbZEOgW_story.html"





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