The Mental Illness Dilemna

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
The Mental Illness Dilemna
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Wed, 08-01-2012 - 10:51am

Advocates for the mentally ill are faced with a deep dilemma each time extreme and deadly crimes are perpetrated by those with a mental illness. Obviously, such acts are not sane or normal; it beggars common sense to suggest that a person who is thinking straight would choose to kill or wound dozens of strangers. And yet most mentally ill people — even those with conditions that have been linked to violence, such as addictions and schizophrenia — are no threat to anyone other than themselves.

[continued]

For the mentally ill, who might be seen as canaries in this coal mine, stigma serves to wall them off from the social support and medical care that are necessary to spur recovery and prevent illness from leading to tragedy. As a society, we need to understand that risk does not equal destiny — and that believing it does is a self-fulfilling prophecy. It’s not wrong to see schizophrenia as a disease or even to appreciate its association with violence, but to view people with schizophrenia as hopeless can in some cases worsen their course unnecessarily.

Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2012/07/31/mass-murder-and-mental-illness-the-interplay-of-stigma-culture-and-disease/?iid=hl-article-mostpop1#ixzz22J3U2hHn

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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Thu, 08-09-2012 - 9:18am

No, I think we are coming at this from different angles and misunderstanding each other.

I believe that resilience can be addressed very pro-actively, so that one could manage more stress than one would have been able to by increasing resiliency ahead of time.

Sure, it can be, but again, we were discussing innate qualities vs a learned behaviors. lol .. and no, I do not believe resiliency is strictly influenced by what we learn. I believe it's a combination of factors that make up how resilient one is.

I believe all people have different levels of resiliency. I believe that given enough stress anyone's resilience can be insufficient.

I suppose, technically one could argue this, but life isn't that mapped out to say for sure. And no one can say how much is enough stress for any one individual.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Thu, 08-09-2012 - 9:22am

Can you look at two children and tell apart which one is resilient and which one is not?

In some cases, sure you can. In some cases, no you can't.

Personally, I think it can pretty obvious to note the child that can't seem to get over the ordinary stresses occurring during the day.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Thu, 08-09-2012 - 9:31am

I agree, usually avoidance, is not a healthy coping style, it does not build resilience.

I am wondering if overweight is a good analogy to lack of resilience. Lack or resilience and too much weight put people at risk of problems and disease. Some people could stand to lose 10 pounds; some people are medically obese.. Just like resilience, there are varying degrees. There is no standard amount of overweight that will lead to disease: clogged arteries, diabetes there is too much individual difference. Same holds for resilience.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Thu, 08-09-2012 - 9:33am

this position that our traits have nothing to do with resilience

I think what I said was I do not view resilience as a trait.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Thu, 08-09-2012 - 10:15am

This random website speaks about resilience as a personality trait. It doesn't appear to be "wrong" but it rubs me all the wrong way.

http://www.task.fm/Top-11-Resilient-Personality-Traits-List

All through it, there have been some people who have risen above it all – who moved on, didn’t wallow in self-pity, but become better, and not bitter. How do some people turn their crises into fuel for positive change, while others become angry, resentful, victimised, and hopeless – beaten by their challenges? There are 11 traits I’ve observed in those who find a way to be better, not bitter, after tribulation and crisis. Here are the top personality traits list I have compiled found in the most resilient people:

They remain accountable. They realise their part in what’s happened to them, and don’t play the victim game. They are optimistic. Despite what’s happened, they hold tight to a hope for a brighter future. They have boundaries. They know where they begin, and others end. They keep compassion alive in their hearts, despite what’s happening around them, and they tune out the negativity, gossip and cruel judgments others throw at them. They ask for help. They reach out for support when they need it, and they get it. They find lessons in their challenges. They seek to learn and grow from all their experiences, and refuse to be broken by them. They avoid self-hatred and self-reproach. They know they’ve made some big mistakes – and admit them full out — but find a way to be self-accepting and forgiving through it all. They revise their negative behaviours. They understand that repeating the same negative behaviours and expecting a different outcome is the definition of insanity. They change their ways. They let go of the need to control. They have an ability to bend and be flexible, and go with the flow of what life gives them. They don’t break themselves against what comes their way. They see a bigger picture than what is before them. Despite how bleak the moment may appear, they have a deep sense of connection to the world and to life, and they sense that there’s a bigger picture unfolding than what meets the eye. They have the courage to embrace change. As scary as change can be, they embrace it and accept that it is within change that expansion — and a richer, more satisfying life — lies. They have faith. Whether it is in God, Allah, Jehovah or other Supreme Being or just faith in the human spirit or themselves, they understand that there is a Master plan and they open their hearts and minds to it.

If you’ve faced tremendous challenges these past several years but want to be better, not bitter, take a look at these traits, and examine the degree to which these match your behaviours. The closer you come to embracing the traits on this top 11 resilient personality traits list, the freer you’ll be from the sadness, regret, and limitations of your past. You’ll let go of what isn’t working, and you’ll co-create a new future that is more joyful and rewarding than you ever imagined. Look at these traits and see how you can improve yourself – strive for an improvement of just 1 percent in each of these areas every day and soon enough you’ll be on top of your game again. So, are you stuck in bitter, or flowing towards “better?”

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Thu, 08-09-2012 - 10:20am

Oh, I think most schools already to do this.

That's good to hear.

Can I ask if you have children or any experience dealing with children?

My first answer was going to be no, I do not work in a professional capacity with children, but then I realized that I have had enough volunteer training and experience working with young kids, school kids and adolescents to say that, yes, I have experience even though it is neither my career nor a daily experience.

 think your responses are very educated and text book,

Hopefully that doesn't mean lacking in practicality. :smileyhappy:


iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Thu, 08-09-2012 - 10:33am

we'll use your words, a child has to experience negative thinking before it be challenged.  

Yes, but I child can learn before they experience negative thinking that if they ever do, it can be challeged instead of believed. They can learn what experiences others have had with negative thinking and learn from others' experience.

having a teacher or psychologist ask the child to think up something like ... "how would you feel if your parents were to divorce?" 

Yes, that is a silly thing to ask and I'm not sure it would generally be helpful. Someone earlier in the thread said did share a bunch of questions to challenge negative thinking in the face of being lied about. That is generally helpful. There are many low level negative experiences that can be used as teaching moments to buffer the big challenges when they come up. In scholastic terms, it is the series of quizzes that prepare students for the test.

when bad things do happen

Bad things happen all the time, day in, day out. Really bad things are fairly common. Horrendous things, thank god, are fewer and farther between.




iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Thu, 08-09-2012 - 10:54am

Snip-it from an article related to our discussion?

While many of these topics may seem to be more the stuff of criminal justice, many of the underlying questions relate to public health - specifically, what we know about how catastrophic violence affects the health of everyone.

Research on survivors of man-made disasters has taught us a great deal about who is most likely to suffer the most severe psychological consequences of exposure to violence, specifically post-traumatic stress disorder.


Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/public_health/Trauma-touches-all-of-us.html#ixzz233qDMiZM 
Watch sports videos you won't find anywhere else

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Thu, 08-09-2012 - 10:57am

this position that our traits have nothing to do with resilience

I think what I said was I do not view resilience as a trait.

No one said resiliency was a trait.

And I am not a discussion revolves around what one person thinks ... but no, no one said resilience is a trait. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Thu, 08-09-2012 - 10:59am

Hopefully that doesn't mean lacking in practicality

I find your posts interesting, but often times, text book and application can be variant.

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