The Mental Illness Dilemna

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
The Mental Illness Dilemna
221
Wed, 08-01-2012 - 10:51am

Advocates for the mentally ill are faced with a deep dilemma each time extreme and deadly crimes are perpetrated by those with a mental illness. Obviously, such acts are not sane or normal; it beggars common sense to suggest that a person who is thinking straight would choose to kill or wound dozens of strangers. And yet most mentally ill people — even those with conditions that have been linked to violence, such as addictions and schizophrenia — are no threat to anyone other than themselves.

[continued]

For the mentally ill, who might be seen as canaries in this coal mine, stigma serves to wall them off from the social support and medical care that are necessary to spur recovery and prevent illness from leading to tragedy. As a society, we need to understand that risk does not equal destiny — and that believing it does is a self-fulfilling prophecy. It’s not wrong to see schizophrenia as a disease or even to appreciate its association with violence, but to view people with schizophrenia as hopeless can in some cases worsen their course unnecessarily.

Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2012/07/31/mass-murder-and-mental-illness-the-interplay-of-stigma-culture-and-disease/?iid=hl-article-mostpop1#ixzz22J3U2hHn

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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Tue, 08-14-2012 - 8:12am

lol ... does it matter? Some of your posts go back to the beginning of the discussion and I see no reason to repeat myself over and over again. Especially, when you are just making the same comments over and over again. I simply do not have the time to thread back and figure out what you are talking about and what context you are in ... if you have that sort of time, that's great. I think it would be so much simpler if you actually addressed the post rather then dragging out issues that have already been resolved.

Seems weird to me people debate this way, but I guess it's because they can't, for whatever really comment on the what's being ask of them.

Maybe you missed my last post:

Not really, but if you say so. You said mental health would improve if schools taught resiliency. That hasn't been the case so, I am wondering how you would form a curriculum and test the students ... lol ... again, it's easy to know the answers, but how one reacts under extreme stress is quite different from a test.

So, how would you "test" a student. You can't possibly ask them to imagine event they would have a hard time getting over and you can't assume the stressors would be the same for all students.

Oh, and again, how would you handle parental support? How do you think lack of parental support effects these programs or even building a child's self esteem.

So again, you look through the list of what you posted as being important and show me some curriculum framework that would teach a child to be say ... more self confident. Show me how you would test this? How would you ensure the support system at home the child would need to be successful? And that is just one characteristic that effects how resilient a person can be. Oh, and don't forget the limitations any school counselor has and finally, please explain, down the line, how this teaching will be effective when you've been chiming in that mental illness is genetic? And apparently, that mental illness has a great deal to do or is effected by with how resilient one is.

I mean really, if mental health is greatly determined by genetics (according to you), then some pep talks from a school counselor isn't going to be the cure all.

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Mon, 08-13-2012 - 5:58pm

You are aware that you can hit the "Re:" symbol to see what post I am referring to, yes?

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Mon, 08-13-2012 - 5:02pm

Yes, I did. You did too. I was just starting to believe that we had resolved that.

Not really, but if you say so. You said mental health would improve if schools taught resiliency. That hasn't been the case so, I am wondering how you would form a curriculum and test the students ... lol ... again, it's easy to know the answers, but how one reacts under extreme stress is quite different from a test.

So, how would you "test" a student. You can't possibly ask them to imagine event they would have a hard time getting over and you can't assume the stressors would be the same for all students.

Oh, and again, how would you handle parental support? How do you think lack of parental support effects these programs or even building a child's self esteem.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Mon, 08-13-2012 - 4:57pm

nis .... thanks for discussion. I just can't sit here debating one liners, taken from the original context. Maybe if I had more time, I would search through and try to figure out what you are referring, but I simply don't have that kind of time.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Mon, 08-13-2012 - 4:55pm

If I were to get a divorce, I probably would not assume "children are resilient".

And, of course, no one said or suggested such a thing.

Actually, another member used those exact words.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 4:11pm

I don't think you take into account individual differences.

Huh?

So, maybe we are discussing different things

I guess that explains it.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 4:07pm

you really can't explain how one would form or teach a class on resiliency.

Yes, I did. You did too. I was just starting to believe that we had resolved that.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 4:05pm

. If I were to get a divorce, I probably would not assume "children are resilient".

And, of course, no one said or suggested such a thing.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 4:01pm

yet, assert it can all be taught away

Oh, goodness, NO!  I have stated that mental illness can not be taught.

Oh, wait. "Taught away" what does that mean?

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 2:27pm

Sorry, I am editing this post out.

I think the main problem I have here is you are saying mental illness is genetic, yet, assert it can all be taught away. I think from there, you can add twists and turns and analyze things taken out of context, but you really can't explain how one would form or teach a class on resiliency. What would the curriculum be? How would you test it? My main point was even if you could teach and test on the fundamentals of mental health, you have no way of assessing how the student will apply that in a real life situation when one is under stress. There is also no way to predict how a person will react under stress, until they are experiencing that stress.

I just don't think a student will react the same way to a hypothetical situation for testing purposes, as they will when experiencing the stress themselves. I think it's easier to say what you should do as opposed to what you would do.

I don't think you take into account individual differences.

I have to clarify, I did use the word teach, but counselors do not teach the general school population the same way a teacher can teach a class. They are limited in what they can do without parental consent and they cannot enter into therapy without it. It's a fine line they cannot cross. So, here, they do go around and lecture children on certain skills and feeling good about themselves, but the personal involvement is not allowed. They do form groups, as I said, but children are chosen according to need and parental consent has to be given. If a child is going through a life crisis, like divorce or death, then certainly the school counselor can step in, with parental consent.

So, maybe we are discussing different things ... schools can teach within their limitations, the fundamentals. How useful that will be is questionable since therapy is generally something very individualized. Finally, I think parental cooperation would be very important in considering the effectiveness of a mental health class.

Oh, one more element to resiliency is a good support system. So again, even if we came up with the perfect hypothetical curriculum, without support from home, it's doubtful a student will benefit from such a class. And again, you talk about bad things happening, but most people do handle bad things, occurring daily, just fine. But again, I am not opposed to what the elementary school here does, but again, I think it's a stretch to say teaching resiliency in school will lead to less mental health problems in our society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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