Merry Christmas vs. Happy Holidays

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-29-1999
Merry Christmas vs. Happy Holidays
21
Wed, 12-05-2012 - 8:53pm

So far in my real life, the whole Merry Christmas vs. Happy Holidays debate has been a Facebook thing only. But today I witnessed something at work that blew my mind.

I was helping patient number 1.  She waved at patient #2 whom she apparently had met yesterday.  They exchanged pleasantries.  Patient #1 said "Happy Holidays!" to pt #2, who replied, rather angrily, "No, it's Merry Christmas! We say Merry Christmas!" all the while pointing her finger somewhat aggressively at patient #1. Patient #1 stood there gobsmacked, as did I.  When Pt #2 left, I turned to patient #1 and said, "Unless you're Jewish."  She replied.  "And I am!"  She also said she was raised in another country and just doesn't get this American obsession with the holidays.  I wished her a happy Hanukah as she left.

I mean really!! Political correctness aside, Pt #2 was just plain rude!  I mean,  she claims to be such a good "christian."

I mean, say Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, or whatever floats your boat, but don't assault me for trying to wish you well.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-29-1999
Tue, 12-11-2012 - 9:31pm
Who attacks Christmas?
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-29-1999
Tue, 12-11-2012 - 9:36pm

ashmama wrote:
<p>I agree with both points. Happy Holidays is fine when you're just giving or receiving good wishes around the time of Christmas, Hannukah, Kwanza, Divali, New Year, etc. It's a good generic catch-all phrase.</p><p>What I can't stand is when people clearly mean Christmas and only Christmas, but are afraid to say Christmas for fear of offending someone. A case in point: a grocery store near us sells "holiday" cookies, which are shaped like Santa and presents (what other holiday could they possibly mean besides Christmas?) but doesn't hesitate to label the Star of David cookies as "Hannukah" cookies. Why not just call things by their proper names and start a dialogue if someone is offended rather than shutting down true discourse by coming up with "inoffensive" names for things.</p><p>I would rather us all be ticked off, wrong and offensive than politically correct!</p>
I guess you have to quote on this new board, because when I replied to a specific post, it looked like I replied to myself.  Anyway...I agree calling cookies of Santa and and stockings "holiday cookies" when there are seperate Hannukah cookies, seems silly.Of course there really isn't anything Christmas-y about snowmen and sleighrides.  I always wonder why Winter Wonderland, Jingle Bells, and Sleigh Ride are considered "Christmas" carols.  Thre is nothing Christmas about them.  And if you live in Australia, it's not even cold at Christmas!

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Registered: 12-12-2012
Wed, 12-12-2012 - 12:16pm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Wed, 12-12-2012 - 1:05pm

According to the middle school band teacher (I was at a band concert last night) the song Jingle Bells started out as a Thanksgiving song.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-16-2004
Thu, 12-13-2012 - 4:01am

 Well we are not that sensative here in Sweden.  I say  Merry Christmas to my friends and they answer back either Merry Christmas or Happy Hannuka and we  fine by that.

One thing is that    Swedish for Christmas is  Jule which is the same at Norse God belivers  Yule so  if I Say God Jul, I have at least covered two relgions.

I do find saying Happy Holidays a bit bland, it is like I am not proud about my own relgion if I had one.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Thu, 12-13-2012 - 10:13am

Of course Santa is a secular symbol, but he's a symbol of Christmas. Why not just label things by their proper names? I also like your idea of having a sign that just says "Holiday Treats" or something and putting everything under it. Not because it's "PC" but because it is logical and descriptive, without the appearance of avoiding the dreaded C word.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Thu, 12-13-2012 - 10:17am

My point wasn't to argue that a tree with lights and ornaments is a Christian symbol, merely that it is a Christmas symbol. In this country (USA), if you show people a picture of a lighted tree, they're going to call it a Christmas tree. The origins of the custom aren't really relevant.

Avatar for turtleemom
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-25-2007
Thu, 12-13-2012 - 10:55am

I live in diverse  suburb of Chicago.  DS has non Chirstian friends who Santa visits and they do not celebtrate Christmas.    He may come on the 24th/25th but he is more of a cultural thing rather than a Christian one. 

Avatar for turtleemom
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-25-2007
Thu, 12-13-2012 - 11:05am
Our tree with lights is not a Christmas tree. It is decorated in December but it is solstice related.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-16-2004
Thu, 12-13-2012 - 11:29am

A Yuletree? Way back they use to have them on the  dungheap to ward off  evil spirits and trolls at Soltice and 150 years ago, the person who came with gifts here in Sweden was a goat and that comes from Thors goats.

Swedish Jul, has more to  do with Yule then  Christmas, we eat  mostely pig meat and  much of the symbolism comes from  Viking times.  And today  we celebrate the Light queen, which today has been linked with a Italian saint instead of a  offering to the sun.