New Standard for Tipping?

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Registered: 07-05-2005
New Standard for Tipping?
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Thu, 09-20-2012 - 8:46am

It’s a question we all face – what’s a reasonable tip for your waiter? After all, the last thing you want is to get on the bad side of the person who handles your food.

According to the New York Post, tips may be adding a bigger chunk to your bill.  Waiters in Manhattan now want a 25 percent tip, and some New York City restaurants that print “suggested gratuities” even present 30 percent as an option, the paper reports.

It’s not just wishful thinking – waiters are starting to get it. A study by Cornell University consumer behavior professor Michael Lynn, who examined 9,000 credit card receipts from a Poughkeepsie, N.Y. restaurant, found that more than a third of diners left tips greater than 20 percent.

Is 25% the new standard for tipping? Depends where you eat- http://bites.today.com/_news/2012/09/19/13967515-is-25-the-new-standard-for-tipping-depends-where-you-eat#comments

 

Wow!  25% seems a bit high!  How much do you generally tip your waiter/waitress?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Mon, 09-24-2012 - 7:36am

who else do you tip? I'm thinking hair dressers, etc. I get a cut and color about every 6 weeks and she was charging me $50.00. I'd add $5.00. Now she is charging me $55.00 and I still give an extra $5.00. But when you are tipping a waiter, you are paying the restaurant for the food and the tip is for the service. In a hair salon, you are paying for the service and maybe a small amount for the product. But you are paying the "owner" if it is a chair-rental type shop, for all of it anyway. So why do we tip them?

This is a good point. My hairdresser and the woman who does my nails, I tip a flat rate. I am not sure why, but partly, it is due the the fact, they charge enough for their service. A waitress makes far less, but now I am wondering, does anyone tip their mechanic or others doing a service for them? Why do we tip some people and not others?

As far as waiters go, they make very little per hour. Part of their pay is passed on the consumer and based on the service they provide. So, to some degree, I tip according to the type of service they gave. It may be less then 20% for poor service or it may be more then 20% for awesome service.

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2009
Sun, 09-23-2012 - 3:26pm
mappers wrote:

Hijack - who else do you tip? I'm thinking hair dressers, etc. I get a cut and color about every 6 weeks and she was charging me $50.00. I'd add $5.00. Now she is charging me $55.00 and I still give an extra $5.00. But when you are tipping a waiter, you are paying the restaurant for the food and the tip is for the service. In a hair salon, you are paying for the service and maybe a small amount for the product. But you are paying the "owner" if it is a chair-rental type shop, for all of it anyway. So why do we tip them?

What about at a buffet type restaurant where all they do is bring you a drink and clear your plates? Do you tip more or less there?

Do you tip anyone else? Why? and how much?


Good question.  My hair stylist is an independent contractor therefore I do not tip her.  She receives 100% of the fee I pay her to do with as she sees fit and if she wants a tip then she needs to adjust her rates accordingly.  My "tip" to her is my repeat business, the referrals I send her, and my support of her events.  Now if she were an employee in someone elses salon making minimum wage or commission I would happily tip 20%.  I use this same method for massage therapists, estheticians, and nail techs.

I do not tip at buffets because there is no server.  I have to fetch my own plates, food, refills, etc.  Most of the buffets I go to have signs posted saying that they do not accept tips.

I also do not put tips in those tip jars at coffee shops, ice cream parlors, or deli's.  I find those tip jars annoying and they're not walking my order to my table or doing anything else that is exceptional. 

I do not have pizza delivered to my home because the cost of gas is so high here my measly little tip wouldn't cover it.  I pick it up to save them the trouble.  I do the same for other types of things that could be delivered like flowers, other foods, etc.

Bartenders I tip $1-$2 per drink depending on what was ordered and the quality of service.

Hotel maids I still tip even though I don't leave them much to do.  I've never known what the appropriate amount to tip is, but I've usually left $5 per night.  I tip per night because sometimes there are staff changes, so if you leave your tip for a weeks stay on your last night then the maid that worked that night would get all of it, not anyone who cleaned your room earlier in the week.  Some hotels include gratuities in your bill, but be sure to ask them who that actually goes to.  Often the maid is not included in that gratuity.

Taxi drivers, valets, airport shuttle drivers, movers, bellhops, & concierges I've never tipped.  I rarely use these services and have never viewed them as people you should tip.

Mail carriers....it actually drives me crazy to hear of people tipping mail carriers.  I don't see anything wrong with giving them a holiday card or baked good (not sure they'll eat it though lol), but to tip them?!  They're government workers and don't our tax dollars go toward their salary and benefits?  Sure their jobs are challenging, but so are the jobs of sanitation workers and they don't get tipped either.

 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2009
Sun, 09-23-2012 - 2:41pm
If the service met my minimum standards then I tip 15% of the bill excluding the tax. They don't get tipped on a fee enforced by the government lol.

If the service was outstanding I tend to tip 20% of the bill excluding the tax. Now there have been times I have tipped well above 20% for simplicity sake. For example the other night I went to Denny's and ordered their $4 value slam. My food was perfect and the waitress was outstanding, but a 20% tip would have been 80cents. I couldn't leave that lovely young lady 80cents it was just absurd. I ended up tipping $2, which technically was a 50% tip, but I felt it was appropriate for the situation.

I personally think a 25% tip being the new standard is outrageous especially if the service simply meets minimum standards. If you aren't going above and beyond the call of duty to get your job done why on earth do I have to dig deeper into my wallet?

When service is not good I have left no tip and have often informed the manager of my frustrations. My disliking what I chose to order or the food being over/under cooked is not a service problem and I do not punish the server for that. But if my food is cold, my order is completely wrong, I'm never given refills, don't have adequate silverware, am treated rudely, etc those are service problems and I see no reason to reward bad behavior.

As for "suggested gratuities" being listed on the receipt for large groups I understand it. Often restaurants assign one server to a large party and they also have other smaller tables to work. I think this is stupid considering the extra work that goes into assisting a group and the manager should have enough staff available to meet restaurant needs. I've only seen these suggested gratuities list 30% and only for parties of 6 or more. If the service is good I don't have a problem with this. If it isn't then I'm happy to inform the manager and/or offer a lesser tip.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-16-2008
Sat, 09-22-2012 - 9:42pm
Depends on the restaurant...I've only worked in one where my credit card tips came on my check. The rest came out of the cash I owed back to the restaurant for people who paid cash. So if my cash due was $400 but I had $50 in credit card tips I would owe $350 cash back to the restaurant.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sat, 09-22-2012 - 4:56pm
I am with your husband, Jam. We lived about two miles from the pizza joint. I go get the pizza, or make the older kid go get it, if he is home.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Sat, 09-22-2012 - 8:57am

  I forgot about pizza delivery, the tip is usually about 10% -12%.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Sat, 09-22-2012 - 6:48am

 We do clean the bottles.  We thought that cleaning them and leaving them out in case the maid (or someone else) wanted them was better than putting them in the trash where if someone wanted them they would have to dig through the trash to get them.  If   no one wants to bother with them  then they can quickly put them into the trash,   just because they are there it does not mean they have to take them.    Since the bottles are not counted as part of the tip, not leaving them would not mean leaving a bigger tip.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-25-2004
Sat, 09-22-2012 - 12:48am

I worked as a maid at a hotel one summer during college. It gave me a new respect for maids. I always leave money for the maid. The amount depends on how long we've been there and how much we needed. As for leaving the cans in states that have a deposit on them, I find that a bit insulting to be quite honest. I know you don't mean it to be, but unless they'd been all cleaned and bagged and I could just take them to the break room, it would just be more work for me as a maid (when I was a maid). I worked in a can-deposit state, but honestly it was just one more task to do if I had to rinse out all the cans and bag them and take them somewhere until I left at the end of the day, and then find time to go recycle them. Please, take your cans, throw them away and leave a little bit bigger tip. That's my thoughts as a former maid.

I have a niece who is a waitress at a popular restuarant. She told us that cash tips she does indeed get to take home that day. The ones left as part of a credit card will come eventually in her paycheck. She does not get anywhere close to minimum wage. However, she's a smart girl and a sweetheart and she's learned the system. She takes excellent care of her customers, checks on them often, is friendly and kind, talks to them briefly, smiles a lot and goes the extra mile. She lives off those tips to pay for college. She actually likes large groups--not because they're "required' to tip more, but because she takes great care of them and they leave above and beyond the required tip. Recently a group of about 12 guys left her a $56 cash tip for about $150 of food and drinks. She was thrilled. It helped pay for one more book.

I generally leave 15-20% for good service at a restaurant. I've left less when service was poor, and probably more at times since the restaurants we go to are never extravagant. And I think about my niece who needs the money for college and try to be kind to young students who do a great job.

I tip the man or woman (they are married and run the shop together--whoever is free cuts my hair) cutting my hair some--I don't pay as much to a percentage as just eyeballing it. Bigger service and I leave a bigger tip, but I never stop to figure it out. It's also awkward as this couple are friends of ours, so I feel awkward tipping, yet would feel more awkward not tipping. So I just always tip what seems fair to them.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Fri, 09-21-2012 - 7:55pm

  I forgot about hotel maids we do tip buy since DH takes care of it I do not know how much.   In Michigan where my family lives there is a $.05 deposit on bottles,   we leave our empties in addition to the cash tip. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 09-21-2012 - 7:46pm
I tip between fifteen and twenty percent at restaurants. At buffets i usually drop a dollar per person at the table. I tip shuttle drivers at the airport a dollar, more if they actually do something nice like wait for me while I am running to the curb, whatever. I tip hotel maids two dollars for the first night and then a dollar for each night after that. I don't get my hair professionally cut very often but if I do, I usually tip two to three dollars for a cut, more if I get a comb out.