New Standard for Tipping?

Avatar for cmkristy
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-05-2005
New Standard for Tipping?
43
Thu, 09-20-2012 - 8:46am

It’s a question we all face – what’s a reasonable tip for your waiter? After all, the last thing you want is to get on the bad side of the person who handles your food.

According to the New York Post, tips may be adding a bigger chunk to your bill.  Waiters in Manhattan now want a 25 percent tip, and some New York City restaurants that print “suggested gratuities” even present 30 percent as an option, the paper reports.

It’s not just wishful thinking – waiters are starting to get it. A study by Cornell University consumer behavior professor Michael Lynn, who examined 9,000 credit card receipts from a Poughkeepsie, N.Y. restaurant, found that more than a third of diners left tips greater than 20 percent.

Is 25% the new standard for tipping? Depends where you eat- http://bites.today.com/_news/2012/09/19/13967515-is-25-the-new-standard-for-tipping-depends-where-you-eat#comments

 

Wow!  25% seems a bit high!  How much do you generally tip your waiter/waitress?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-24-2006
Sat, 10-13-2012 - 6:35am
I have done nails for almost ten years. I work in a fairly upscale, high priced environment. I recently did the math and my tips average a little over 21%. They account for a little over 1/3 of my total income. Including tips my average gross pay is between $16-$28 an hour depending on the time of year. I think this is more than reasonable considering that I had to go to school and get licensed for this, I have to pay to renew my license, and it is extremely.physically demanding work. I don't think minimum wage is anywhere near adaquate for the work I do. I live in a large city with a high cost of living.

I get the vast majority of my tips on credit card, and get them in my paycheck and I prefer this. When I moved into my apartment with my H we had to show that we each made 3x the rent in gross income (we were not married yet, and the building manager treats that as a roommate situation). I could not have done that if I were getting 1/3 of my income in cash. If I want to get a mortgage or any other loan in the future, having most of my income on paper is the far preferable scenario. The only reason it might be preferable to get tips in cash is in order to avoid paying taxes on it. It honestly insults me a little that occasionally people will tip in cash for this express reason. I am not a tax cheat, and I don't get why people would assume everyone in the service industry is.
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Tue, 09-25-2012 - 5:01pm

Same here. I guess I was just wondering ... how to word this, what criteria one considers before tipping someone. A waitress generally makes less then minimum, a hairdresser generally doesn't make a lot, but my hairdresser owns her own place, rents out chairs so has little overhead and she makes $60-100 an hour, but I still tip her lol .... so my mind started thinking maybe it was because they provide a service, but mechanics provide a service .....

guess I was just pondering all that.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-18-2004
Tue, 09-25-2012 - 4:42pm
Yeah, kinda the same!

Mechanics in a small town have folks that will follow them wherever, out of loyalty and trust.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-18-2004
Tue, 09-25-2012 - 4:38pm
A small fraction of people offer a tip to the mechanics. And I'd never heard of it before, so it can't be standard practice, I wouldn't think. (or else I'm so out of the loop because my ex-husband was a mechanic and I never needed to go to a garage!)

It's a small place, only 3 of us, and both mechanics have contact with all customers.






iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 09-25-2012 - 10:39am
When I used to take my car to the car wash it was standard to til the guy who brought yr car back to you. I think the whole detailing crew shared the tips.
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Tue, 09-25-2012 - 7:35am

We've been in business for nearly 15 years and my husband worked in other facilities for, hmmm, over 15 years and it was never standard practice. In larger shops, the customer doesn't even have contact with the mechanic. I was just wondering if it was a generally accepted practice elsewhere because it's not here.

Does everyone tip you?

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-18-2004
Tue, 09-25-2012 - 6:53am
I'd never heard of tipping a mechanic until we opened the garage last year.
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Tue, 09-25-2012 - 6:34am

Yes, we do too and on occasion we also receive tips or small gifts, but I don't think, in general, it's an accepted practice or the norm. Is it where you live?

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-18-2004
Tue, 09-25-2012 - 4:57am
I own a garage, and a few people do tip the mechanics.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-03-2001
Mon, 09-24-2012 - 10:49am

 

mappers wrote:


Do you tip anyone else? Why? and how much?

 

I tip my haircutter --- between $3 and $5 for a $23 cut and dry. She's part-owner but a good cutter.

I tip taxi drivers too...

And at Christmas, I leve a tip for the paper delivery, and as much as allowed ($20 and under) for the postman. Why those people? Well, we are rural, they have to pay for their own cars and gas, they tend to go above and beyond (the postman - woman now -  actually carries things ot the door even though he could just leave them at the box on the street if it is raining, if it is live plant, etc.).

When we lived overseas (Beijing), some apartment complexes handed out lists of approved New Years' tips for various building employees, from concierges to maids! I never quite made all of their suggestions, although we did tip the people we saw and used daily (in Beijing, the desk guards for the building, the maids who did the common areas, and the odd repairman who worked on our flat).

I always leave my spare change and a few bills for hotel maids... and always tip bellboys, room service, etc. Ditto baggage handlers at aiports...

And on cruise ships, they add a "tip" which is supposedly divided among all staff on the final bill but some also allow you to opt out and others provide envelopes which you address to the staff you liked. Oh, and tour bus drivers/guides --- they get a tip slipped to them too, as we depart the bus!

For the longest time, we lived in places where tipping was  frowned upon (I seem to remember that Londoners thought tipping was an insult --- so the Ireland thing rings true to me) or directly forbidden (China - although it was becoming a little more common by the time we left) so maybe we are overcompensating!



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