Okay to miss school for fun stuff?

Avatar for cmkristy
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Registered: 07-05-2005
Okay to miss school for fun stuff?
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Thu, 01-31-2013 - 2:52pm

Moms cited visiting family members, vacations, special sibling events, concerts, and even “mental health days” as good reasons to take kids out of school. 

Alyssa Chirco, a mother of one who lives outside St. Louis, agrees that parents, not school administrators, know best. “I reserve the right to check my child out of school at any time, for any reason.” 

What is the harm in missing a day here or there? Teachers and administrators talk about lost learning time, but the financial reasons are just as relevant. Most schools are funded using a formula that incorporates the average daily attendance. Absences mean fewer dollars allocated.

http://www.today.com/moms/parents-split-over-whether-its-ok-let-kids-miss-school-1B8186531

What do you think?  Is it okay for students to miss class for fun things? Have you let your children do it before?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 02-07-2013 - 12:22pm
I think if a child is struggling in school to the extent that he or she might not pass the standardized tests, that there is a problem. The problem isn't that the kid gets a day off once or twice a year. Obviously if your kid misses a lot because of illness, the fun day off becomes less of an option. But if I had a kid who was there 99% of the time and struggling still, I'd question whether the child were receiving the right services or perhaps even whether the child were in the right school.
Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 02-07-2013 - 1:04pm
You'd have a point if poor performing schools were just because of slow kids.

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 02-07-2013 - 3:13pm

Aren't "poor performing schools" those who do not have the right percentage of kids passing the standardized tests (never mind the stupidity of all the testing in the first place?).  As I said, if I had a kid who was in danger of not passing the standardized test, and therefore having scores that count against the school, I'd be quite worried.  The child isn't learning what the state says the child should be learning.  Assuming the test is a good instrument to measure learning (big assumption there) eiither something is going wrong with the child, or something is going wrong with the school, or a combination of both.  If something is going wrong with the child, the child needs services to find out why he/she isn't learning, and then to bring him or her up to grade level, if at all possible.   If nothing is wrong with the child, then the school isn't doing its bit to provide the lessons that will allow the child to pass the standardized test.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Sat, 02-09-2013 - 2:26pm

Well, I'm familiar with your stand on state tests, Lol, I don't like them either but for now, that's all there is, And they are tied to funding! So what do you do, educator.. For fun breaks, fancy trips now and then are ok as long as kid is passing? 

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Sun, 02-10-2013 - 7:51am

<<If something is going wrong with the child, the child needs services to find out why he/she isn't learning, and then to bring him or her up to grade level, if at all possible.   If nothing is wrong with the child, then the school isn't doing its bit to provide the lessons that will allow the child to pass the standardized test.>>

The parent should intervene and have a role in there somewhere.  Set study hours, delay or deny fun activities until homework is done, know and remind the child when her tests are scheduled ~ then ask the child how the test went, instill the importance of education in your child.   I don't doubt children who come home after school to an empty house, are often unsupervised or have parents who don't even show an interest are the ones who don't perform well in school.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 02-10-2013 - 8:39am
I certainly believe that the unmotived kid that doesn't apply himself at school has less less interested parents too. If there's something school CAN do they will but how do you reach out to a kid that doesn't care and parents that don't care too.. Others suffer b/c of their attitudes.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Sun, 02-10-2013 - 8:46am

>>For fun breaks, fancy trips now and then are ok as long as kid is passing? <<

I would think the point is ... if a child is doing well, a missed day here and there won't change that.

If a child isn't doing well, a missed day here and there isn't going to change that and the school should investigate why the child isn't doing well.

When my child attended a private school, the principal would allow some children to miss school for family vacations. She based her decision on how well the child was doing in school. Her assumption was, if they are doing well, they know the importance of education and can afford to miss a week of school. Doesn't make much sense if you ask me.

This same principal blamed my sons academic struggles on his absences due to illness. My son was recently diagnosed with adhd, inattentive type.

Both her assumptions were wrong. So, really, a fun day or not, a missed day here or there will not have a profound impact on a child's education.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sun, 02-10-2013 - 8:47am
If my child is doing well in school, and hadnt missed a lot of school for other readons, I see no problem with pulling him out of school from time to time for something we deem more valuable than the day at school. My son has missed three days of school this year - one for illness, one for a trip to Washington DC, and two half days for medical procedures.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sun, 02-10-2013 - 8:55am
My child is sixteen, almost seventeen. He is long past the time when I need to monitor his homework or progress in school. These things are now his responsibility - we went through a gradual process with each of our kids over the years between about ten and fourteen when they became the masters of their own schedules. So far it's worked. We always believed our job as parents involved giving them the space, time, and tools to succeed, placing them in an appropriately challenging learning environment, and stepping back to let them do their job. My kid is good about coming to me when he needs help; he changed schools this year and they teach math somewhat differently than they did at his previous school, so he requested math tutoring. He's doing quite well at the local high school, and has almost finished the required high school curriculum so he's taking a course at the local adult career center and also two college courses. And? We let him take a day off to go to Washington, DC last week. And, if another such opportunity were to arise, we'd do it again.
Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 02-10-2013 - 9:11am

I value education too much to believe that, Or perhaps I just take campaigns about keeping your kids in school too seriously! I do have one kid that struggles academically, She's on an IEP for that too. I work with the teachers that help her and work my darndest to help her myself too, But it is frustrating when programs like that get cut (and other programs, btw too) b/c of others negligence and carelessness that contribute to low test scores! Problems in schools today are b/c of the breakdowns at home more than anything else.

 

 

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