Okay to miss school for fun stuff?

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Registered: 07-05-2005
Okay to miss school for fun stuff?
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Thu, 01-31-2013 - 2:52pm

Moms cited visiting family members, vacations, special sibling events, concerts, and even “mental health days” as good reasons to take kids out of school. 

Alyssa Chirco, a mother of one who lives outside St. Louis, agrees that parents, not school administrators, know best. “I reserve the right to check my child out of school at any time, for any reason.” 

What is the harm in missing a day here or there? Teachers and administrators talk about lost learning time, but the financial reasons are just as relevant. Most schools are funded using a formula that incorporates the average daily attendance. Absences mean fewer dollars allocated.

http://www.today.com/moms/parents-split-over-whether-its-ok-let-kids-miss-school-1B8186531

What do you think?  Is it okay for students to miss class for fun things? Have you let your children do it before?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sun, 02-10-2013 - 9:19am
I am not sure what the "that" in your first sentence refers to, but to me, it sound as if you value school attendance more than you value education.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 02-10-2013 - 11:36am

Lol, Thank you for those kind words. Perhaps you'd like to explain the excuse mentality that cross all socio-economic lines.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sun, 02-10-2013 - 12:36pm
I'm participating in this thread to debate the wisdom of occasionally removing one's children from school so they can have other experiences. I don't know why you're assuming I'd rather talk about something else.
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2003
Mon, 02-11-2013 - 7:19am

I certainly believe that the unmotived kid that doesn't apply himself at school has less less interested parents too.

Why would you reach such a conclusion? Certainly you understand there's countless learning disabilities and disorders which would make a child appear to be unmotivated?

It's actually the schools responsibility to recognize this possiblity.

If there's something school CAN do they will

Although some parents are not interested and lack motivation, there's many teachers who are unmotivated and lack interest. I really don't understand your belief that all schools do what they can do. I've been fortunate enough to know a few exceptional teachers, but, in general, I pretty much had to fight for my children's rights.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Mon, 02-11-2013 - 11:50am

<<Problems in schools today are b/c of the breakdowns at home more than anything else.>>

I agree.  More than ever before in my lifetime, private and public schools must answer to the parents.  If they do not, it's because the parents are not speaking up.  Some parents want it that way.  I don't.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Mon, 02-11-2013 - 12:01pm

That's what I said.  If a parent has a hands-off policy toward schoolwork starting at age 10, then he can't be expected to have the school intervene.  Such a parent would be unaware of a problem.  He certainly can't expect the school to be aware of a problem.  Or even to correct the problem.

I wouldn't expect a school to see 3 consecutive years of bad grades and say, There might be something wrong with Johnny as we know he's not living up to his potential.  Because that's the parents' job.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Mon, 02-11-2013 - 12:21pm

Ommy94 ~ You mention: <<but, in general, I pretty much had to fight for my children's rights.>>

Isn't that pretty much what Jamblessed was talking about?  If parents are involved ~ even taking it to the classroom, the principal, the PTO, etc. ~ and the school responds, then the system is working.

<<

Why would you reach such a conclusion? Certainly you understand there's countless learning disabilities and disorders which would make a child appear to be unmotivated?

It's actually the schools responsibility to recognize this possiblity.>>

That last bit made my skin crawl.  If any of my children had a learning disability, I am supposed to be the first to recognize it.  Unlike school teachers, I'm an expert on my child.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 02-11-2013 - 2:25pm

What could possibly make you think that just because a parent begins gradually turning over responsibility for completing schoolwork to the student beginning about age 10, that that parent would be "unaware" of problems the student is facing?  Honestly, you don't have to helicopter over the child until the day he or she is 18, or 21, or whenever you are willing to trust that your parenting is having some effect, in order to understand what's going on with the child.  If your child is 16 or 17 and you are still checking daily to make sure that he/she completes his or her homework, and editing said homework, and whatever, are you planning on going to college with the kid?  Showing up at his or her first job to make sure everything is completed to the boss' specifications?  The point of parenting is to turn out a competent next generation.  At some point, you're going to have to trust that that work is done.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 02-11-2013 - 2:30pm

You may be an expert on your child, and I hope you are, but not all parents are experts on learning disabilities/differences.  Some parents actively resist getting help for their kids for fear of labeling the kids.  There is often a complex dynamic that involves home, school, and student, and it doesn't always go smoothly.  I have one with a fairly severe learning disability who is also intellectually gifted.  Because of his native intelligence, he never really fell below grade level in elementary school even though he was clearly not living up to his potential.  The administrators of the local school district was quite happy to tell me that because he was at or near grade level every time he was tested, that they "didn't have to" do anything to help him achieve his potential.  Luckily he had parents and some great teachers who were willing to advocate for him.   I eventually pulled him out of public school when it became clear that was not where he was going to learn best.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 02-11-2013 - 4:46pm

Poor performing schools aren't b/c they are full of kids with LDs. How do you motivate the kid that doesn't want to be there? The kid that has the potential but doesn't apply himself? There are only so many hours in a school day and teachers plates are full dealing with the excuses and behaviors more than you realize, And all that takes away from their jobs to teach.

I don't know what you're saying in your second paragraph ommy, Of course a parent fights for her kid. Its the parents that don't that wreck it for everybody else! Schools can't perform to their fullest potential when kids there aren't and all I'm saying is that starts at home! I find it interesting that you point the finger at "unmotivated" teachers, What does that look like anyway? If a teacher isn't doing her/his job then s/he's fired or re-assigned. If it's just an observation my kid makes (and she has, Lol!) then it teaches her a life lesson that there are good and bad teachers in this world and there will be a future of good and bad employees, bosses etc. she'll have to deal with too. 

 


 


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