Parents have 2 babies die while co-sleeping

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-25-2004
Parents have 2 babies die while co-sleeping
32
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 1:04am

There are warnings about not having your infant in your bed (co-sleeping). Too many babies have died this way. The parents in this story had a baby die, got pregnant and put their 2nd child in their bed, only to have him die as well. Should they be charged with a crime? Should any parents that have a child die in this manner be charged?

http://www.insideedition.com/news/8242/inside-edition-speaks-to-parents-about-dangers-of-co-sleeping.aspx

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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 6:55am

"The dangers of sleeping with a baby are well established."

That's not...um....accurate. Sharing a prepared bed with an infant is LESS risky than having an infant sleep in a crib in a different room.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 7:03am

http://www.evolutionaryparenting.com/co-sleeping-on-trial-the-vanessa-clark-case/

It is absolutely essential that I mention that at the time of her son’s death in 2010, a blood test revealed that Ms. Clark had heightened levels of both Xanax and Hydrocodone, both of which had been prescribed by a doctor.

That's not a death due to safe co-sleeping. That's a substance problem. Silly lame stream media.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-27-2001
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 10:24am
Yes. That is typically the problem. Sober cosleeping is still safer than crib sleeping.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 11:35am

 What is dangerous about crib sleeping?

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-25-2004
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 1:02pm

I tried to find a better source on this situation as I'd seen it on TV and sadly the ET source online was the best I could come up with, unfortunately.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-25-2004
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 1:06pm

"Sharing a prepared bed with an infant is LESS risky than having an infant sleep in a crib in a different room."

As if those are the only 2 choices? We had our son's cradle in our room when he was first born. We also had an extra bed in our son's room and since I'm a worrier I slept in his room when he first started sleeping in his crib.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 3:40pm

 We had our son's cradle in our room when he was first born. We also had an extra bed in our son's room and since I'm a worrier I slept in his room when he first started sleeping in his crib.

Both of those choices are ideal. There are lots of less ideal ways to sleep with infants in the home. :smileyhappy: Sharing a prepared bed is more risky than either of your choices.

Falling asleep with an infant in a chair or couch, is obviously more risky than a crib in a separate room.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 3:43pm

Crib sleeping isn't risky per se, it is being apart from the parent that makes it risky.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009

  How does the parent sleeping in the same room make it less risky?

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 3:54pm

http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/dca-dea/stages-etapes/childhood-enfance_0-2/sids/ssb_brochure-eng.php#index_eng_03

Research has shown that room sharing is associated with a reduced risk of SIDS, and is recommended until your baby is at least six months old. Room sharing means placing your baby to sleep in a crib within arm’s reach of where you sleep. This may mean putting your baby’s crib next to your bed in your room, or putting a mattress next to his or her crib in your baby’s room.


An American Academy of Pediatrics
policy statement recommends infant room sharing. It advises parents that infants should sleep in the parents’ bedroom and close to their bed.

The term cosleeping refers to any situation in which an a committed adult caregiver, usually the mother, sleeps within close enough proximity to her infant so that each, the mother and infant, can respond to each other's sensory signals and cues. Room sharing is a form of cosleeping, always considered safe and always considered protective. But it is not the room itself that it is protective. It is what goes on between the mother (or father) and the infant that is.

Merely having an infant sleeping in a room with a committed adult caregiver (cosleeping) reduces the chances of an infant dying from SIDS or from an accident by one half!

http://www.naturalchild.org/james_mckenna/biological.html

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