Parents have 2 babies die while co-sleeping

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-25-2004
Parents have 2 babies die while co-sleeping
32
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 1:04am

There are warnings about not having your infant in your bed (co-sleeping). Too many babies have died this way. The parents in this story had a baby die, got pregnant and put their 2nd child in their bed, only to have him die as well. Should they be charged with a crime? Should any parents that have a child die in this manner be charged?

http://www.insideedition.com/news/8242/inside-edition-speaks-to-parents-about-dangers-of-co-sleeping.aspx

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sun, 08-12-2012 - 7:40am

I do not believe that co-sleeping is on trial here. This mom had a substance problem and poor judgment. She is accused of placing the baby in imminent harm.

Since elevated levels of hydrocodone and Xanax were found in her blood, and several jars of (legally prescribed) pills were found on her nightstand, Vanessa Clark faces mandatory drug testing while she waits at home for sentencing.

The court is compiling a pre-sentencing report, and there is a lot of grist for that mill in Angelina County records. In addition to several theft and drug convictions, Clark was convicted of aggravated assault and sentenced to four years in prison back in 2000, though she was released through shock probation after serving less than a year. She hasn't kept her nose entirely clean since then, but the frequency and magnitude of the arrests on her rap sheet have both dwindled. Since getting out of prison, she's only piled up a couple of hot check busts and a shoplifting case.

http://blogs.houstonpress.com/hairballs/2012/04/vanessa_clark_second_sids_deat.php

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-25-2004
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 10:50pm

Good research sharing nisupulla. :catvery-happy: And yes, I understand your point. Because it happens to a small percentage it doesn't mean it will frequently or always happen. My understanding is that anytime you have a new baby sleep on a very soft surface (mattress, for example), you're increasing the odds of SIDS. And if you're a sleeper that sleeps very soundly and/or rolls around, thrashes, etc in bed, then you have a higher risk of rolling onto your baby and suffocating him/her.

The original question I wondered about was whether these parents should have known not to do this again? If you'd had one baby die sleeping in your bed, would you do it again with the next baby? And does doing it again mean the parents should be charged with a crime? I don't have the answers. I just saw the story and wondered. I can't imagine their grief from having two infants die. Is that punishment enough?

I live about 30 miles from where, a number of years back, a mom forgot her baby was in the back seat of her vehicle and left her (or him? can't remember) there all day. After work she drove to the sitter's, only to realize what she'd done. She was charged with a crime (I don't remember what) and there was a trial. She was found not guilty. She has to live every day of her life remembering what one day of forgetting cost her.

So is it enough for these parents, especially when it's not clear what killed their 2 infants, to have to live wondering if something they did caused their babies to die? Or did they commit a crime.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 5:29pm
There is a possibility that either or both of these babies died of SIDS rather than being suffocated in the parental bed. Or that the parents killed the children. I supposed an autopsy will be in order.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 5:23pm
There are crib accidents every year. I remember when my son was small a mother I barely knew lost her Baby, and I think he was about four or five months old, when the child somehow managed to pull the bottom sheet off the Matthew and he became entangled in it. Those things are uncommon, but so are co-sleeping deaths.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 4:18pm

That's why the whole "don't co-sleep" meme is so ridiculous, it does not teach people what they need to know.

Sadly. the "don't co-sleep" meme is designed to sell cribs.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009

 Wow.  I never knew that.

  My kids slept in their own bedrooms from the day they came home from the hospital. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 3:56pm

news stories talk about "another baby dying while cosleeping" ....This is akin to suggesting that because some parents drive drunk with their infants in their cars, unstrapped into car seats, and because some of these babies die in car accidents that nobody can drive with babies in their cars because obviously car transportation for infants is fatal. You see the point.

http://www.naturalchild.org/james_mckenna/biological.html

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 3:54pm

http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/dca-dea/stages-etapes/childhood-enfance_0-2/sids/ssb_brochure-eng.php#index_eng_03

Research has shown that room sharing is associated with a reduced risk of SIDS, and is recommended until your baby is at least six months old. Room sharing means placing your baby to sleep in a crib within arm’s reach of where you sleep. This may mean putting your baby’s crib next to your bed in your room, or putting a mattress next to his or her crib in your baby’s room.


An American Academy of Pediatrics
policy statement recommends infant room sharing. It advises parents that infants should sleep in the parents’ bedroom and close to their bed.

The term cosleeping refers to any situation in which an a committed adult caregiver, usually the mother, sleeps within close enough proximity to her infant so that each, the mother and infant, can respond to each other's sensory signals and cues. Room sharing is a form of cosleeping, always considered safe and always considered protective. But it is not the room itself that it is protective. It is what goes on between the mother (or father) and the infant that is.

Merely having an infant sleeping in a room with a committed adult caregiver (cosleeping) reduces the chances of an infant dying from SIDS or from an accident by one half!

http://www.naturalchild.org/james_mckenna/biological.html

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009

  How does the parent sleeping in the same room make it less risky?

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 08-11-2012 - 3:43pm

Crib sleeping isn't risky per se, it is being apart from the parent that makes it risky.