questioning parents during times of tragedy

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-18-2006
questioning parents during times of tragedy
64
Mon, 07-23-2012 - 6:44pm

Sorry, I have to just go on a little bit of a rant here.

I'm sure by now everyone has heard about the tragedy that befell Aurora, Colorado at the movie theatre. Sad, sickening, revolting. Yet you know what I keep reading online? People questioning the judgement of the parents for taking little kids and babies to a late showing movie. Really?

I was incensed that people would look at this tragedy and begin pointing fingers at anyone but the shooter. What good does it do to question the parenting practices of those in the theater – the victims? It is akin to wondering why a rape victim was dressed scantily at a bar. It is disgusting.

There are people out there who abuse, neglect, and torture children. We're really taking THIS time of tragedy to pass judgement on something so benign? Really?? Like this couldn't have happened just as easily during the day?

How about the millions of other questions we should be asking? About gun control, security in public places, mental health evaluations, etc?

This just makes me very angry. I feel HEARTBROKEN for anyone who lost someone there, regardless of age. It's tragedies like this that makes me wish I hadn't brought kids into this messed up world to begin with!

Awhile back, I posted an article about a local, teenaged girl who was killed by her ex boyfriend. Her father is someone I've known for a long time. Basically, they had sex under a local bridge and that's when he killed her. His reasoning was because "she was doing drugs and I didn't like the changes in her". There have been comments in the local paper along the lines of "where were this girl's parents? She was doing drugs and having sex under bridges?" And let me tell you....she had wonderful, loving, parents who simply adored her. She was a bit wild, perhaps, but it's nothing that her parents did wrong.

Man, things like this just make me so damn angry!

Angie

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
We probably should start another thread to discuss the propriety of taking kids in public and where and when...this has nothing to do with shooters, because who is expecting a massacre when you take your kids out in public? I would maybe choose to keep my kids up for some kind of once-in-lifetime event, like maybe live coverage for a manned landing on Mars or something. But a movie that will be playing the next day, and the day after, and the day after? No. I took them to Harry Potter Release Parties when they were about ten though, so who am I to talk?
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Tue, 07-31-2012 - 10:39am

The movie is rated PG13 or Parental Guidance for those under 13. That is not a movie for kids. Parents are advised to use their discretion because of the amount of violence in the movie etc..

People are commenting that not only were children under 13 at this movie but that the movie was shown late at night. However, commenting on what other people may judge as poor parental choices does not mean that people are not sadden for those parents, do not grieve for those parents and have not make similar choices themselves.

The comments have nothing to do with criticism of children in public. Many of those commenting are parents too. People are just trying to find some way to protect their children and themselves from these unforeseen tragedies, to make them feel less powerless. It is human nature.

They went to a movie and tragedy struck. Enough said.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-18-2006

<<<The comments have nothing to do with criticism of children in public. Many of those commenting are parents too. People are just trying to find some way to protect their children and themselves from these unforeseen tragedies, to make them feel less powerless. It is human nature>>>

I agree, I'm beginning to see that. It's like when the news says the people who died in the car crash weren't wearing seatbelts. It's just a way to distance yourself from the chance it could happen to you.

The sad, scary truth is that this world is a horrible place, no matter who you are. Where you live. Or what you do.

Angie

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